Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Best Way to Share Projects/Code


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
8 replies to this topic

#1 shaqb4   Members   -  Reputation: 469

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 17 March 2013 - 04:50 PM

I finally finished my first game, a pong clone, and would like to share it and get some feedback. I'm not sure what the best way is to do that though. Should I use github or a similar service, make my own website/portfolio or are there other alternatives I could use? I can't wait to see what people think and thanks for the answers in advance!



Sponsor:

#2 EddieV223   Members   -  Reputation: 1407

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 17 March 2013 - 05:00 PM

svn, git, or another good way is cloud service like dropbox, with dropbox you can share a folder with someone and they automatically sync.


If this post or signature was helpful and/or constructive please give rep.

 

// C++ Video tutorials

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo60USYV9Ik

 

// Easy to learn 2D Game Library c++

SFML2.1 Download http://www.sfml-dev.org/download.php

SFML2.1 Tutorials http://www.sfml-dev.org/tutorials/2.1/

 

// SFML 2 book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1849696845/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1849696845&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 


#3 ByteTroll   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1504

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:06 AM

Subversion, GIT, or cloud sharing is the way you want to go.  You could use services like Github, or you could host/pay to have a server hosted.  You could also zip up the files and put them somewhere.


▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
I see the future in 1's and 0's
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

"This is called programming. The art of typing shit into an editor/IDE is not programming, it's basically data entry. The part that makes a programmer a programmer is their problem solving skills." - Serapth

#4 greenzone   Members   -  Reputation: 672

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 10:24 AM

I find drobbox is a nice and easy way to share code.


J-GREEN

Greenpanoply

#5 Yrjö P.   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1412

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 11:12 AM

No contest. Bitbucket, Github or equivalent is the best way. It allows people to easily view pieces of the code without downloading the whole thing, or to easily contribute fixes or tweaks. The code should be on version control to begin with for your own sake.

#6 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5756

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 11:30 AM

Sharing it as code, github.  Sharing it as an executable, or simply a zip, dropbox or something similar.



#7 shaqb4   Members   -  Reputation: 469

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:38 PM

Thanks, I think I'm gonna go with github for now. This is a little off topic, but how do you actually build or compile a project that's on github. Do you just open up he project in an IDE and build it? For example, i saw that torque3d was on there, so if I wanted to turn that repository/source into a usable product/executable, is that how I'd do it (I know that most of these projects have places to download binaries and such, but I'm just curious)?

 

Sorry if this is a stupid question.



#8 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5756

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:52 PM

Thanks, I think I'm gonna go with github for now. This is a little off topic, but how do you actually build or compile a project that's on github. Do you just open up he project in an IDE and build it? For example, i saw that torque3d was on there, so if I wanted to turn that repository/source into a usable product/executable, is that how I'd do it (I know that most of these projects have places to download binaries and such, but I'm just curious)?

 

Sorry if this is a stupid question.

 

No, you still build it locally.

 

Think of github like a remote mirror image of the directory on your computer, just that the mirror has the ability to save previous versions.

 

When you "checkout" from github, you are pulling down a copy of the files from the remote repository to your local computer.  When you "commit" you are pushing the copy from your computer up to the remote version.

 

All the executing stuff, like compiling, linking, etc... still happens on your local computer in a local directory.

 

Not a stupid question, the git stuff is very easy, once you know it, and very mystifying until you do.  Of course, once you run into your first problem, you wont call git easy anymore. :)  At bigger companies, there are actually people whose entire job is to manage the build/version controlling for the project, so it's not a completely trivial thing.


Edited by Serapth, 18 March 2013 - 04:53 PM.


#9 shaqb4   Members   -  Reputation: 469

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:29 PM

Thanks, that was a great answer. It cleared it up perfectly. smile.png


Edited by shaqb4, 18 March 2013 - 06:10 PM.





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS