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What language do I use?


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#1 SureLockHomes   Members   -  Reputation: 191

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 09:30 PM

Ok so I know it's been asked a thousand times, but what language truly should be used to make good quality games. You can use any and there isn't a specific one, but based on the fact that I know a small-medium amount in C#(XNA framework), C++(just basic stuff), and Python(a little more than I know about C++)...which should I try to learn the most in right now for developing an independent, most likely 2D, game? I don't really have a preference on which one I like the best, I also would like to note that I plan on a future in game design, be it independent or professional(at a AAA company).



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#2 Cornstalks   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6974

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 09:37 PM

Ok so I know it's been asked a thousand times, but what language truly should be used to make good quality games.

Out of curiosity, why do you think you'll get The One True Answer if it's never been given before in the thousands of times this question has been asked?

 

You can use any and there isn't a specific one

And you just answered your own question.

 

but based on the fact that I know a small-medium amount in C#(XNA framework), C++(just basic stuff), and Python(a little more than I know about C++)...which should I try to learn the most in right now for developing an independent, most likely 2D, game?

Any of them. Seriously, you're very likely (as in 100% likely if you actually have any interest in programming) to learn several languages as you go through life making games. Using one now doesn't prevent you from using a different one later. Just pick whichever one you enjoy working in the most. And if there isn't one that stands out as particularly interesting or enjoyable to you, put them on a dart board and throw darts until you hit one. Seriously.

Good luck smile.png


Edited by Cornstalks, 17 March 2013 - 09:37 PM.

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#3 Khaiy   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1342

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 09:37 PM

You should use the language you know best, which in your case sounds like C#. Plus, you already know some of an API that works with C#. That's a great recipe that you won't have with any other language or API right now.

 

The quality of games you make has everything to do with your skill as a coder and a game designer, and virtually nothing to do with the language you choose. The other factors you're hinting at are irrelevant at this point in your skill development.


Edited by Khaiy, 17 March 2013 - 09:38 PM.


#4 SureLockHomes   Members   -  Reputation: 191

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 09:44 PM

And if there isn't one that stands out as particularly interesting or enjoyable to you, put them on a dart board and throw darts until you hit one.

Challenge Accepted.



#5 cignox1   Members   -  Reputation: 723

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:07 AM

Well, they could tell you which is the language (mostly) used to build core engines of games such as Crysis and the like. But as already said, that info will not make you a better coder, not will make you write your first games (which is something far more important).



#6 GuardianX   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1496

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 12:38 PM

If you like C# and not against going further in learning it, I'd say go with it.

I know you want to start as perfect as you can, but honestly don't affraid to make mistakes - it's a natural part of the learning process. At this point language wont be the thing that is holding you from creating your personal Crysis =)



#7 SureLockHomes   Members   -  Reputation: 191

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:27 PM

Still stuck on the decision.



#8 Cornstalks   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6974

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:10 PM

Still stuck on the decision.

If you hit all the languages with a dart, you set them up on your dart board wrong ;)


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#9 ultramailman   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1563

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:10 PM

I'd say python, because it is closer to the design aspects. It is fast enough for 2D games.



#10 SureLockHomes   Members   -  Reputation: 191

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:22 PM

Still stuck on the decision.

If you hit all the languages with a dart, you set them up on your dart board wrong ;)

I can't find a dartboard xD



#11 SureLockHomes   Members   -  Reputation: 191

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:21 PM

Ok C++, I found myself enjoying it more today.



#12 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1410

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 10:51 PM

Since you know Python and C#, go with that. From my experience programming games, learning game programming is just learning a graphics API(unfortunately where I study in college it is not taught) and solving problems given the data structures you already implemented 



#13 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8658

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 11:20 PM

 

Still stuck on the decision.

If you hit all the languages with a dart, you set them up on your dart board wrong ;)

I can't find a dartboard xD

 

Make one! Where are your problem solving skills? tongue.png  (tongue in cheek)


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#14 Ravyne   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7128

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:54 PM

 

 

Still stuck on the decision.

If you hit all the languages with a dart, you set them up on your dart board wrong ;)

I can't find a dartboard xD

 

Make one! Where are your problem solving skills? tongue.png  (tongue in cheek)

 

Make one? Pick one! Nearly any noun will do-- people, places, things...



#15 SureLockHomes   Members   -  Reputation: 191

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 12:08 AM

Ok so I know it's been asked a thousand times, but what language truly should be used to make good quality games.

Out of curiosity, why do you think you'll get The One True Answer if it's never been given before in the thousands of times this question has been asked?

 

>You can use any and there isn't a specific one

And you just answered your own question.

 

but based on the fact that I know a small-medium amount in C#(XNA framework), C++(just basic stuff), and Python(a little more than I know about C++)...which should I try to learn the most in right now for developing an independent, most likely 2D, game?

Any of them. Seriously, you're very likely (as in 100% likely if you actually have any interest in programming) to learn several languages as you go through life making games. Using one now doesn't prevent you from using a different one later. Just pick whichever one you enjoy working in the most. And if there isn't one that stands out as particularly interesting or enjoyable to you, put them on a dart board and throw darts until you hit one. Seriously.

Good luck smile.png

 

Im going with C++, any suggestions on libraries for a 2D game, I will eventually start 3D so I was thinking SFML but it seems so tedious to set up.



#16 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 12:18 AM

SFML is a good choice for C++.


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#17 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6065

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 05:54 AM

Tedious to set up is something you have to get used to if you're going with C++ smile.png

SFML is fairly straightforward though, just follow the tutorial and you'll be fine.

 

 

Ok so I know it's been asked a thousand times, but what language truly should be used to make good quality games.

Out of curiosity, why do you think you'll get The One True Answer if it's never been given before in the thousands of times this question has been asked?

 

>>You can use any and there isn't a specific one

lockquote>

And you just answered your own question.

 

>but based on the fact that I know a small-medium amount in C#(XNA framework), C++(just basic stuff), and Python(a little more than I know about C++)...which should I try to learn the most in right now for developing an independent, most likely 2D, game?

Any of them. Seriously, you're very likely (as in 100% likely if you actually have any interest in programming) to learn several languages as you go through life making games. Using one now doesn't prevent you from using a different one later. Just pick whichever one you enjoy working in the most. And if there isn't one that stands out as particularly interesting or enjoyable to you, put them on a dart board and throw darts until you hit one. Seriously.

Good luck smile.png

Im going with C++, any suggestions on libraries for a 2D game, I will eventually start 3D so I was thinking SFML but it seems so tedious to set up.

 

 


Edited by SimonForsman, 24 March 2013 - 05:55 AM.

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