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Determining joystick z-axis function


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#1 george7378   Members   -  Reputation: 1196

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 06:48 AM

Hi everyone!

 

I've got DirectInput working for my game, and it's looking good for the X and Y axes. However, I am having a little problem with the Z-axis. I have two joysticks - one with a yaw control (twistable handle) and one without. Both have throttle sliders though. My problem is that the one without the twistable handle assigns the throttle as the Z-axis, so in my game, the throttle control is used for yaw. I haven't tried the one with the twistable handle yet (it's not with me right now).

 

So my question is: how do I determine what each of the axes on my joystick are assigned to? I guess there's something I can do while I'm enumerating the joystick to determine whether or not the Z-axis is assigned to a throttle or an actual yaw control, but I'm not sure what it is.

 

Thanks!



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#2 Weeve   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:57 PM

Have a menu where you assign keys via what is inputted, for instance "Set yaw axis" and there would be a button next to it, once the button is pressed, the next event you pick up should be the yaw axis, that way, players who prefer gaming controllers, or non standard flight sim joysticks can change the config if they don't like the defaults, this will also work in your case, where you can make a config for each controller (automatically reccognize controllers, if you want to be fancy), and the configs would say "he wants to use throttle for Yaw".. etc then simple lock onto the signals from the keys in config file  for your controls



#3 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3156

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 03:55 PM

Hi,

 

 

Congratulations on getting input! smile.png

 

It might not help you on this project, but long term you might want to look at Device Link.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#4 george7378   Members   -  Reputation: 1196

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 04:58 PM

I did consider having a menu for it, but since I only need to make use of the main axes, it might be slightly overkill. I'll do a bit more research (I guess there's some connection between different joysticks as to what axes are mapped to which DirectInput channels). If it's still a problem after I try it out with some different sticks, I'll see what I can do!

 

3Ddreamer: Thanks :) It didn't take long after I found a good tutorial, and looked at the sample that came with the SDK (actually, I think the code from the tutorial was taken from the sample). What's Device Link? I googled it, but it's quite a broad thing to search and I didn't get much.

 

Thanks!



#5 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3156

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:59 PM

Making sure to have the latest driver is the first step. 

 

 So my question is: how do I determine what each of the axes on my joystick are assigned to

 

Joysticks have standard procedure of installing a joystick driver when the device is first plugged into the computer.  The joystick driver should have left a shortcut somewhere, such as in the Taskbar or Hidden Icons window which you would click.  Opening the device driver causes a dialogue window to appear which can in some cases allow you to check for driver updates.  Also, many of them allow you to access the driver by a configuration interface that provides a way of assigning Axis to certain joystick input actions, as well as slider or button configuration as well.   Some have an optional profile feature to let you associate the joystick configuration with a particular program. You might find the driver executable by Windows Explorer search box, which I have done in the past and click on the executable or setup.  Search the name of your joystick in your Windows Explorer to find the setup.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer





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