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I Want Game Programming


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#1 @GameProgrmmr   Members   -  Reputation: 108

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 05:12 PM

Hello my name's Luis from New York I'm currently 15 and I want to learn Game Programming.

I want to know whats the best Language to learn first I've heard in some places that Python or C# are good but I'm not sure.

I want to learn coding now so that it will be easier in the future to learn in college.

And if you have any tips or heads up for coding please feel free to tell me Thank You very much!rolleyes.gif



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#2 kaktusas2598   Members   -  Reputation: 888

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 06:32 PM

Both Python and C# are great starting choises. I'm more familiar with C# and I think it has greater support to windows, but you can really choose what you like. If you go with C#, you can later(after learning language), try XNA game development API, and if you chose python, you can later try pygame(also game development library) as well. Start small, build some simple text games in console, and then you can advance with something in graphical interface. Good luck! :)


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#3 wizardpc   Members   -  Reputation: 282

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 06:48 PM

I'd learn a language first, before even attempting any kind of graphic programming.  If you are serious about programming and college.  Maybe C# would be good choice?  Once you create a few applications, you can easily look into XNA for some easy "pong" like games.
Just a suggestion.



#4 @GameProgrmmr   Members   -  Reputation: 108

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 07:09 PM

Thank You Guys I Appreciate it.



#5 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1504

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 08:51 PM

I want to point out there is no such thing as a BEST Language. I can say from experience, there are pros and cons in learning a particular language. If you are starting out, I would recommend Java. Java is also taught in college, so you will be ahead of the game. It is a really fun language to learn.

 

The best way to get started is to start writing and building simple programs using the language. Java being one of them. It is important to understand what you are actually doing in a programming sense with the code you are typing out. There is no memorization in programming. It should only make sense to you. Make mistakes and start coding. Just keep coding and everything will come full circle. One of the important things is to run into errors. That way you know how to solve the problem.

 

You can start with Python too if you want. 

 

Happy coding!


Edited by warnexus, 10 April 2013 - 08:53 PM.


#6 tisdadd   Members   -  Reputation: 313

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 10:50 AM

I would agree with warnexus for the most part, and want to point out one other advantage to learning Java at your age... you should be able to take the AP exam and pass with flying colors to either get some scholarships or college credits, or both if you so chose.

 

However, more important than the language is learning the concepts behind programming. I think that with Java you should be able to do so fairly easily, especially if you are hanging out on these forums as well.

 

Once you have the concepts down, the language is trivial, you pick what is best for a specific project and your style. 



#7 redw0lf   Members   -  Reputation: 334

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 11:08 AM

For beginners, who start learning a language i would suggest to use the language with the most examples and documentation available. In this case java is often a good, maybe not he best way, to go. 

As far as the rest is concerned I agree with tisdad and warnexus. The big issue with programming is only to understand the logic behind it, once the logic is clear you need to express yourself using some kind of language, which then can be nearly everything after some hours of training.


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#8 @GameProgrmmr   Members   -  Reputation: 108

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 04:27 PM

Thank you but i got a doubt.

Do you mean Java or JavaScript?



#9 Ectara   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3061

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 05:01 PM

JavaScript is used mostly for web development, though very few engines use it as a scripting language with heavily modified syntax.

I'm willing to bet any amount they are referring to Java. They are not the same thing, and have nothing in common.



#10 @GameProgrmmr   Members   -  Reputation: 108

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 05:08 PM

JavaScript is used mostly for web development, though very few engines use it as a scripting language with heavily modified syntax.

I'm willing to bet any amount they are referring to Java. They are not the same thing, and have nothing in common.

Oh okay thanks for clearing that out.



#11 Code_Grammer   Members   -  Reputation: 247

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 08:48 PM

Unless you're specifically trying to learn a language, I would begin with something like Unity3D. No, I'm not a unity fanatic, but it will cut your development time a great deal, they have some decent documentation, and some complete game examples. Also, you can script in JavaScript and C#. There's really no such thing as a "Best" language; every language has its own idiosychrocies. Generally, what you do in one language, you can do in another.    C++, C#, and java are object oriented languages: meaning, they give you the ability to create "objects" as opposed to functional programming. Say you develop with C#. That means you have to use the .NET platform, and you're developing mainly for windows. Then you still have to consider asset creation.   JavaScript is a pain in the butt sometimes, because you have to run the code in a web browser, sometimes without any visual feedback.There is more to creating a game than simply writing code.You need to get programming practices down pat.


Edited by Code_Grammer, 11 April 2013 - 08:51 PM.


#12 HelloDerr   Members   -  Reputation: 111

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 11:29 PM

Personally, before I started doing any programming in a game environment I learned how to code. I started with C++, the university I go to started us with C++. After becoming fairly comfortable with the language I got interested in learning a few others. I looked into Java and then C#. I decided a few months ago to try out Unity. It has been fun playing around with it. I suggest learning to code, in any language, that has a lot of online support. Then jumped into a simple engine, like unity, and play around. Make things, break things, test, fail, and sometimes succeed. If you are motivated you will eventually get some great results! 



#13 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1504

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 12:15 AM

Thank you but i got a doubt.

Do you mean Java or JavaScript?

Java is correct



#14 @GameProgrmmr   Members   -  Reputation: 108

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 05:17 PM

Unless you're specifically trying to learn a language, I would begin with something like Unity3D. No, I'm not a unity fanatic, but it will cut your development time a great deal, they have some decent documentation, and some complete game examples. Also, you can script in JavaScript and C#. There's really no such thing as a "Best" language; every language has its own idiosychrocies. Generally, what you do in one language, you can do in another.    C++, C#, and java are object oriented languages: meaning, they give you the ability to create "objects" as opposed to functional programming. Say you develop with C#. That means you have to use the .NET platform, and you're developing mainly for windows. Then you still have to consider asset creation.   JavaScript is a pain in the butt sometimes, because you have to run the code in a web browser, sometimes without any visual feedback.There is more to creating a game than simply writing code.You need to get programming practices down pat.

 

Ok thanks, But do I need any prior knowledge or experience to learn Unity3d?






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