Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

We're offering banner ads on our site from just $5!

1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


Who are your developer heros?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
30 replies to this topic

#21 Dwarf King   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1912

Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:32 AM

All the old and new developers/entrepreneurs who did what people said they could not do back then and now. In other words all the developers/entrepreneurs who taught themselves, dropped out or had an "irrelevant" education and therefore did not hold a knightly title like software engineer or CS graduated and still managed to make great stuff that would make the people with fine titles look like amateurs...  


"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education"

Albert Einstein

"It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education"

Albert Einstein

 


Sponsor:

#22 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2499

Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:47 PM

Gabe Newell, not for code, but because he understands the development process.
 
Every time I hear him talk, I am awe struck at how he thinks about how to get the most out of his talent pool.

Do you have any relevant interviews? I'm interested to hear some. I haven't heard him talk very much :/

Sure. I think this one is probably my favourite.


if you think programming is like sex, you probably haven't done much of either.-------------- - capn_midnight

#23 ISDCaptain01   Members   -  Reputation: 1443

Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:33 AM

All the old and new developers/entrepreneurs who did what people said they could not do back then and now. In other words all the developers/entrepreneurs who taught themselves, dropped out or had an "irrelevant" education and therefore did not hold a knightly title like software engineer or CS graduated and still managed to make great stuff that would make the people with fine titles look like amateurs...  

 

Ditto



#24 JonathanJ1990   Members   -  Reputation: 167

Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:57 AM

I would have to say shigeru miyamoto the man and his characters were instrumental  to most of my childhood and early teenage years.  I have countless amazing memories with several of his titles and i am a massive mario fan to this day , to me Shigeru miyamoto is everything i aspire to be or produce as a game developer .   

 

I also have to say my appreciation for peter molyneux comes and goes i was heartbroken in my teens when " project ego" managed to only be fable 1 but as i've gotten older, learned more about game development and my perspective on the series changes I feel like everytime i go back to fable the game seems just a bit more complete than it was last time. while by no means perfect i think it includes enough subsystems that makes the world one interesting cohesive universe but isn't quite as deep in terms of lore or things as skyrim or the witcher . It's weird but i appreciate peter molyneux some days and i loathe him others haha but i think about him enough that i can definitely say the titles he has worked on and spearheaded have impacted me substantially .

 

lLastly I would have to say the team at " The Behemoth" their games are so raw and so founded on the basis of being fun and addictive first and then wrapped in their own unique style that i can't help but imagine it has to be incredible to work on that team. sometimes it just seems like the fun they had in development oozes out of the monitor / tv. screen and  i absorb it hungrily. 


Edited by JonathanJ1990, 03 May 2013 - 03:00 AM.


#25 Aurioch   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1304

Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:48 PM

For me, I'd say Jun'ya Ota, better known as ZUN from Team Shanghai Alice, most famous for his Touhou Project series.



#26 Mussi   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2095

Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:14 PM

Hodgman. He seems to know something about everything and more often than not he knows everything about something.



#27 boolean   Members   -  Reputation: 1714

Posted 05 May 2013 - 09:46 PM

An afternoon at the pub with Rob Conery would be interesting. 


[Android] Stupid Human Castles - If Tetris had monsters with powers and were attacking human castles. "4/5 - frandroid.com"

Full version and Demo Version available on the Android app store.


#28 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9263

Posted 06 May 2013 - 12:07 AM

I have no "developer hero". Idolization is not really my thing. But I often find inspiration in other people's accounts and experiences. Nobody in particular though.


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#29 Nytegard   Members   -  Reputation: 823

Posted 06 May 2013 - 01:10 PM

I have no "developer hero". Idolization is not really my thing. But I often find inspiration in other people's accounts and experiences. Nobody in particular though.

 

I certainly wouldn't say I idolize a developer, but I can understand having a developer hero.  For me, it is probably Roberta Williams.  Her games are pretty much what inspired me to go into the computing field.



#30 FableFox   Members   -  Reputation: 525

Posted 06 May 2013 - 09:51 PM

For me it was more of 'mentorship'. I bought a lot of Andre books (tricks DOS and tricks Windows) and communicate through the forum a lot.


Fable Fox is Stronger <--- Fable Fox is Stronger Project

#31 Anri   Members   -  Reputation: 597

Posted 13 May 2013 - 05:46 PM

John Carmack.  I consider him my programming and mathematical mentor...even though I've never met him!  I do wish he would write a book on his collective thoughts on computing.

 

Mike Singleton.  Mike proved that even a mere 48K of memory can provide a Return of the King scale epic! Its sad he is now gone...

 

Timothy Albee and Ray Harryhausen.  Both are known as master animators, but have taught me to be self-reliant and to take an interest in all aspects of what I do. I apply their approaches to my own personal projects and by Jove it works.  Also sad Ray is gone too...

 

Lawrence Holland.  Responsible for the bloody excellent Tie Fighter.  You, Sir, Rawk hard and its been too long since you made a cool Space Combat Sim...

 

Andre lamothe.  Tricks books rule.

 

Roman Ormandy.  TrueSpace allowed me to enter the lovely world of 3D animation for a price the honest working man could afford.  Shame he didn't steer clear of Micosoft...

 

Gearbox Software.  Responsible for the bloody excellent Aliens Coloinal Mar - oh wait....sorry. Bollocks. Slip of the tongue... o_O


Edited by Anri, 13 May 2013 - 05:53 PM.





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS