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Absolute Beginner


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#1 convey   Members   -  Reputation: 115

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 11:40 AM

So i am an absolute beginner to game programming and i am kinda frustrated as to where i should start. I know Java and C# and i would not mind looking into another language if i need to. I know it all depends on what language i want to do but i just don't know which one i want to use. Also i would really like it if someone told me about a good book to start with as well and also if they could direct me the right way. I don't care how long it takes because i have a lot of free time and i would really like to do something because i'm always bored.



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#2 David.M   Members   -  Reputation: 731

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 12:29 PM

This article should address all the questions you have right now and is a great start. If you have any more questions after reading the article, feel free to post them here. 



#3 Aliii   Members   -  Reputation: 1346

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 12:31 PM

What are your goals? Be an indie(as a hobby), be an indie and make money, be part of an indie team/small studio, or work for a big company?

Which language: search the "For beginners" forum for threads. Every other day someone asks this question.

If you know Java and C# already then you could start learning C then C++. If you want to.

 

Also i would really like it if someone told me about a good book to start with as well and also if they could direct me the right way

 

Depends on what way you want to go. Indie/small team/big studio

 

I don't care how long it takes because i have a lot of free time and i would really like to do something because i'm always bored

 

If you are bored because you dont have to work yet then better make up your mind soon;)



#4 convey   Members   -  Reputation: 115

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 01:47 PM

the reason i'm bored is because of all the free time i have. My plan overall is to start my own indie company but i want as much experience as i can get i don't start university till September and I want to start already. My plan is know the language then learn how to do game programming with it and then make a simple game then make my way up from that.



#5 Aliii   Members   -  Reputation: 1346

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 03:01 PM

My plan is know the language then learn how to do game programming with it and then make a simple game then make my way up from that.

Sounds good.

 

My plan overall is to start my own indie company

So make games and sell them. All alone or within an indie team? Its important because if you wanna do it all alone, you will need to be a good programmer, artist, designer, PR guy, marketing guy, etc. (Of course you can buy art, music, hire a marketing guy ...but you get the point:)). In a small team you dont need all of that.

 

my own indie company but i want as much experience as i can get

If you dont want to work for a company then you dont need "experience"(maybe you will change your mind later, ...but the Uni will give you enough experience to get an IT job, so no problem). You need to make games.

 

 



#6 convey   Members   -  Reputation: 115

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 05:27 PM

i was thinking since i have the most experience with java i would start with that and make a little 2D game to get familiar with the concept and i would be the one making the art for this game it wont be anything fancy at all but i just want to have something that i created that way i know what to do and where to go from there. I was hoping you can tell me some resources like books and what now i went to that website and look over the books there but i'm kinda low on money for now so i just want to make the right choice and not get a bad book and have to wait like a month or so until i can get another book. Also any free site that you know would be very helpful.



#7 Tasaq   Members   -  Reputation: 1179

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 05:34 PM

I suggest XNA, i know that a lot people might say "don't because it's dead", but I still believie it's a very good start point to get general idea of game programming. You can still go with mono or SharpDX toolkit. They are all beginners friendly. If you want some resources go here:

 

http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com/xna-tutorials
http://www.riemers.net/

 

If you go with sharpdx/mono, those tutorials are rather portable (not 100% sure).



#8 radioteeth   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 927

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:48 PM

If you know Java, and you can see a light at the end of the tunnel with it, start making stuff. My initial experiences entailed exploring specific concepts, and their various unique facets. Making a window with a rendering context (or setting mode 13h ;) drawing a triangle (plotting a pixel), loading/drawing a bitmap, etc..

 

Playing a sound.. gathering input.. doing simple main loops that control simple things in realtime.

 

Everybody's journey is within a different context, or theme.. Everyone seems to follow a specific type of interactive experience (FPS, RTS, RPG, etc.......) and the variants of each.

 

Just learn how to do more with what you already know, and try to build with that, and steer where you focus your source of information from to get what you want out of it. But, like I always say, the best way to learn is by doing.

 

If you *really* feel the need to pick up a different language, C/C++ isn't a far cry from Java, syntactically.. In actuality, Java is like a unifying platform that runs under multiple platforms, but it really prevents programmers from having the sort of specific control over how things are actually being done on the machine - which really only concerns those interested in maximizing the performance of their software at (what I consider to be) cutthroat levels.

 

The hobbyist developer, who just wants to make something worthwhile, can do it in Java. It's all a matter of self-application, from learning to doing. The most productive feedback loop you will ever discover.






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