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Beginner Game developer


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#1 VideoGamer   Members   -  Reputation: 107

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 04:31 AM

Hello everyone,

 

I'm a game developer in-training and a intermediate programmer.

I know c#, c++, asp.net and html and I'm learning python, JavaScript, html5 and directx.

 

Most of what I've learn comes from my attempt to make a cross-platform game engine and level editor.

I know I should use free pre-made engines like Unity3D but I feel like I'll learn more by writing my own engine.

 

But what do you think? Should I quit making my engine and start making simple 2D games?

Or should I continue with the confidence that I'm doing something that will be useful to me in future?



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#2 WavyVirus   Members   -  Reputation: 735

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 06:21 AM

If you have never made any games, it is probably a good idea to do so before continuing with your engine. At the very least, creating a few simple games or becoming familiar with a couple of existing engines will give you valuable insight into how your own engine should work.

#3 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6106

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 06:21 AM

Do whatever you want.

 

If you want to make a game: Use whatever engines, libraries, tools, etc that helps you get the job done. (This goes for any other real world project really).

 

If you enjoy writing low level code, write low level code,

 

As for making an engine, read this: http://scientificninja.com/blog/write-games-not-engines


I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#4 Celiasson   Members   -  Reputation: 502

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 06:25 AM

Well, it all depends. You need to ask yourself: Do I want to make a game now or do I want to make a game later? Making your own engine will teach you a lot of low level code - which can be very useful and fun! But it will also take you a lot longer to finish a game. There is no right or wrong answer, do what you feel is the most fun right now and no matter what you decide you will gain valuable experience.



#5 VideoGamer   Members   -  Reputation: 107

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 06:32 AM

Thank you for your time and answers guys. smile.png

 

I haven't really thought thoroughly about what I want to do. happy.png

I Just wanted to start learning as much as I could in the shortest period of time.

 

I'll have a think about what I want to do and go from there.

Again, thanks!


Edited by VideoGamer, 26 May 2013 - 06:32 AM.


#6 WavyVirus   Members   -  Reputation: 735

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 07:48 AM

Creating an engine can certainly be educational. But I think that an engine created before you have experience in creating games, and before you have been exposed to existing engines, will largely be a throwaway exercise. It is unlikely that the engine you end up with will be designed in such a way that it is actually convenient to use for creating games.

 

I took a similar approach, creating an "engine" before I had completed a game of significant scope (although I had created a few simple games before this). I did learn a lot, but the engine was not actually particularly useful in its own right. I no longer use any of the engine code.



#7 0r0d   Members   -  Reputation: 819

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:01 AM

Keep working on the engine if that's what's fun for you.  But, at some point try to make a game with it.  There's a lot about engine development that you will only figure out once you're actually trying to build a game with it.  Just keep the scope of that game small so you can finish it and then get back to more engine development.  Probably, by the time you've built one or two games with your engine, you will have learned enough to have all kinds of ideas on what to improve and add to your engine.  Spend some time making the "version 2" of the engine, then repeat with a new game based on that.

 

Just remember that what you built for an engine the first (or even second) time around will be pretty basic and naive.  Keep looking up information on engine design and better ways to do things, and dont be afraid to completely rewrite your engine each time. 



#8 VideoGamer   Members   -  Reputation: 107

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:11 AM

@WavyVirus

 

Thank you for the advice.

I understand what you're trying to say but doesn't making an engine give you more learning experience?

Nether the less, I'll try making a game without trying to create an engine first.

 

@0r0d

 

Thanks for the advice! I was planning at some point during next week to start a simple game with my engine but decided to make a game without it.

After I finish the game, I'll go back and work on my engine.



#9 WavyVirus   Members   -  Reputation: 735

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 11:06 AM

I understand what you're trying to say but doesn't making an engine give you more learning experience?


It's hard to say. You'll probably learn more quickly about the low-level graphics, physics etc by jumping straight into these systems. But it's quite possible that you would learn more about what a good engine should actually *look like* (in terms of how it is structured and used for creating specific games) by working on a couple of games first.

#10 VideoGamer   Members   -  Reputation: 107

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 11:14 AM

@WavyVirus I get what you're saying.

Make a few games to understand how a game engine should be structured for proper game usage.

I understand that now.

Thanks!


Edited by VideoGamer, 26 May 2013 - 11:14 AM.


#11 0r0d   Members   -  Reputation: 819

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:21 PM

Creating an engine can certainly be educational. But I think that an engine created before you have experience in creating games, and before you have been exposed to existing engines, will largely be a throwaway exercise. It is unlikely that the engine you end up with will be designed in such a way that it is actually convenient to use for creating games.

Creating something that ends up being not extremely useful is part of the learning process.  No one starting out will be able to build a great engine right off the bat, it just wont happen.  You need to go through it once just to learn what all the parts are that you need and how they fit together.  Then you go through it again and you have something useful, but not great.  Once you build your third engine (or so) is when you actually start to have something that's worth using and maintaining, because by then you know what you're doing.

 

If someone wants to build engines, then they should start building an engine.  Start with a basic one that meets the needs for a simple game.  The make the game and start over on a new better engine using what you learned.






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