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Beginner looking into game making


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#1 donuts56   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 07:54 PM

Hi, I have recently been looking into how to make games  on pc. I have found the whole thing to be rather... overwhelmingohmy.png I was wondering if anyone could put it in easier to understand terms. I would like to make a 3d game, maybe horror, or even a game similar to "Dear Esther" (Just exploring nice looking enviroments) for starts. I would like to know what engine to use, and any basic knowledge I would need to learn to start making this. I know almost nothing about game making as of right now, so make it simple xD.

 

Thanks in advance. biggrin.png



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#2 Quantumcat   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:05 PM

There are probably some kids' game making tools out there but they would be limited. If you want to make a whole, proper game you will need to learn c++ (may take a few months of dedicated practice), then learn OpenGL (a month or two of dedicated practice to draw basic shapes, learn picking, camera controls, etc, then a few months to learn shaders, lighting, textures etc), and if you didn't do linear algebra and physics at university you will need to learn physics and linear algebra which will take a variable amount of time depending on your prior training. Then you will be able to make a very, very basic game. A few years later you can look to make a proper 3D game. But working by yourself and not in a team making that 3D game could take years, even one that's ostensibly simple.



#3 donuts56   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:08 PM

There are probably some kids' game making tools out there but they would be limited. If you want to make a whole, proper game you will need to learn c++ (may take a few months of dedicated practice), then learn OpenGL (a month or two of dedicated practice to draw basic shapes, learn picking, camera controls, etc, then a few months to learn shaders, lighting, textures etc), and if you didn't do linear algebra and physics at university you will need to learn physics and linear algebra which will take a variable amount of time depending on your prior training. Then you will be able to make a very, very basic game. A few years later you can look to make a proper 3D game. But working by yourself and not in a team making that 3D game could take years, even one that's ostensibly simple.

I was just wondering about a simple game. It wouldn't really need physics. Just something really simple. I would still need to learn all that stuff?



#4 DeafTV   Members   -  Reputation: 1193

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:00 PM

I don't have much time to answer all of your questions right now so here's a couple links to good articles:

 

http://www.gamefromscratch.com/post/2011/08/04/I-want-to-be-a-game-developer.aspx

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976

 

Good luck!


#define TRUE FALSE //Happy debugging...


#5 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1399

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:19 PM

If you have no prior experience in making games, just start with the basics. Trust me, an off-the-shelf game takes years of experience for one person to master. And even then, there is still a finite amount of time to make sure everything works and looks awesome.

 

If your goal is to make a PC Game, start with something simple and basic like getting a screen to show up. 

 

A game like "Dear Esther",  I can imagine requires artistic mastery and skilled programming.

 

If you never programmed before, I am pretty sure pc game programming is going to be an overkill.

 

How much experience do you have with a programming language?

 



#6 Quantumcat   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 10:29 PM

You could make a console-based game af

 

There are probably some kids' game making tools out there but they would be limited. If you want to make a whole, proper game you will need to learn c++ (may take a few months of dedicated practice), then learn OpenGL (a month or two of dedicated practice to draw basic shapes, learn picking, camera controls, etc, then a few months to learn shaders, lighting, textures etc), and if you didn't do linear algebra and physics at university you will need to learn physics and linear algebra which will take a variable amount of time depending on your prior training. Then you will be able to make a very, very basic game. A few years later you can look to make a proper 3D game. But working by yourself and not in a team making that 3D game could take years, even one that's ostensibly simple.

I was just wondering about a simple game. It wouldn't really need physics. Just something really simple. I would still need to learn all that stuff?

You could make a simple text-based, console game in Java or C++ after only a few weeks of learning the language. If you want to draw images and have animations you will need to learn OpenGL. If you just want buttons and text fields and things you can learn Visual Basic pretty fast, I learned that in school using the "Sams Teach Yourself Visual Basic in 24 Hours" book which came with a CD that had the API on it.

If you want to be serious but get some results quickly I would say learn Visual Basic and make some tic tac toe games and maze games etc, then when you get bored of it learn C++ (which will be a bit faster after mastering Visual Basic) and then learn OpenGL, but if you just want to play around, find some kids' game making software. You can get pretty-looking games that require no programming knowledge to create.



#7 CptBringdown   Members   -  Reputation: 120

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 11:14 PM

I agree with earlier comments.  If you want to build your own game from the ground up, you will need to learn some coding.  There are other ways to get started, but really learning to program is the best way make your own game.

 

1) You should start off by picking a programming language.  One you know already may be preferred to get started, but most games will be written in c++, c#, or java.  I personally think that c++ is the best choice, but others may disagree.

 

2) You should pick an IDE (Integrated Development Environment).  This will do a lot of the work for you that is a huge pain to do yourself, and overall make you more efficient.  I would recommend Microsoft Visual Studio, the express version is free, and there are many resources that can be found through googling to answer most questions you would have.

 

3)  Pick a set of libraries to use/learn.  OpenGL is an obvious one to work with graphics, but there are many other useful libraries to do things like grab keyboard input, create a window for your OpenGL, play sounds, etc.  I would recommend starting by using Glut.

Here is a great OpenGL tutorial, it is long, but it goes through step by step:

http://fly.cc.fer.hr/~unreal/theredbook/chapter01.html

 

Here is a quick description of a few libraries and what they will allow:

SDL - Open a window for OpenGL, Input (from mouse/keyboard), Audio, Networking, more.

Glut - Open a window for OpenGL, Input (from mouse/keyboard)

OpenAL - Audio

 

4)  Pick a small project to start making.  The best way to learn is by trying and failing.  By starting a small project on your own you will start to get a feel of what everything takes in terms of work, and what you actually enjoy.

 

5)  Move more in depth into what you enjoy.  Coding is simply a tool, once you figure out what you really enjoy, you can find more resources about those specifics.  If you want to do everything it will take a while, but it is always nice to try a bit of everything to see what you enjoy most, and what things you want to find an already built solution for.

 

Hopefully that will get you started.



#8 DeafTV   Members   -  Reputation: 1193

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 09:48 AM

There are probably some kids' game making tools out there but they would be limited. If you want to make a whole, proper game you will need to learn c++ (may take a few months of dedicated practice), then learn OpenGL (a month or two of dedicated practice to draw basic shapes, learn picking, camera controls, etc, then a few months to learn shaders, lighting, textures etc), and if you didn't do linear algebra and physics at university you will need to learn physics and linear algebra which will take a variable amount of time depending on your prior training. Then you will be able to make a very, very basic game. A few years later you can look to make a proper 3D game. But working by yourself and not in a team making that 3D game could take years, even one that's ostensibly simple.

 

This is assuming you are jumping straight into 3D programming (and not using an engine).  The first link I posted explains about different languages and expectations, so I won't go into much detail about that here.  There are many languages that you can pick from and still be a successful programmer.  Most AAA rated games do use c++, but that doesn't necessarily mean you should, especially if you are just starting out and don't feel comfortable with it.

 

You do not have to jump straight into OpenGL (in fact I don't advise it) as you should probably be starting with 2D games.  There are many libraries for 2D games that handle most of the lower-level drawing.  Eventually if you want to get into 3D, you would need to learn OpenGL with the math that goes along with it.

 

So, in short, pick a language you enjoy, learn the language, make simple games, and then slowly move on to harder things.

 

Another good article I remembered: Here


#define TRUE FALSE //Happy debugging...


#9 MrMaker   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 05:18 AM

You can go with c# and unity. C# is a wonderful language. You can make 2d and 3d games on unity. It will take some time to learn c# and unity but it will be worth it. Also with unity you have a option of 3 language s you can use like unityscript (JavaScript), boo, and c#. Unity has two editions. The free and pro editions. Unity pro cost $1500 one time fee or you can pay monthly currently. If you know c# you can transfer the skills to java and learn it pretty fast. If you want to get a job in the game industry. Than c++ is the way to go with graphic programming. There are 2 more options. One is too animation and the other is to 3d model. Which can get you a job in the game industry. So choose your path.

#10 Barzai   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 619

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 06:04 PM

Well, I don't know if there's really any such thing as a simple 3d game.  However, I looked up Dear Esther, and it looks to be a mod of the Source Engine.  There's several of them:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Source_engine_mods

 

If you're looking to make something, but you aren't really interested in learning all of the ins and out of coding under the hood, it may be worth your while to make a mod of a game rather than starting from scratch.

 

Full disclaimer, though, I've never written any game mods myself.  I know that quite a few companies release tools with their games that let you make your own levels.  From what I understand, with the more sophisticated ones you can make viable stand alone games.  It sounds like that's more in line with what you want to do.

 

Since I'm not a modder, I can't really help you more than pointing out that it exists.  I'm pretty sure that Starcraft 2 was released with full development tools.  I'm not sure where exactly you would get the Source Engine (like Dear Esther used), but an internet search would probably fill in the gaps for you.



#11 donuts56   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 02:48 PM

Thanks a whole lot for all the responses guys. I'm gonna look into some guides you recommended and start learning c++. Again, Thanks alotbiggrin.png 



#12 Karsten_   Members   -  Reputation: 1576

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 05:24 PM

Languages aside, I think if you intend your game to focus on environments, then any toolchain with a decent visual editor might be a nice place for you to start.

 

I am thinking UDK, Source, Unity purely for their tools rather than for their technical merits.


Edited by Karsten_, 10 June 2013 - 05:24 PM.

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#13 Jarwulf   Members   -  Reputation: 222

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:40 PM

There are probably some kids' game making tools out there but they would be limited. If you want to make a whole, proper game you will need to learn c++ (may take a few months of dedicated practice), then learn OpenGL (a month or two of dedicated practice to draw basic shapes, learn picking, camera controls, etc, then a few months to learn shaders, lighting, textures etc), and if you didn't do linear algebra and physics at university you will need to learn physics and linear algebra which will take a variable amount of time depending on your prior training. Then you will be able to make a very, very basic game. A few years later you can look to make a proper 3D game. But working by yourself and not in a team making that 3D game could take years, even one that's ostensibly simple.

 

 

Not the world's greatest expert but this doesn't sound completely right. They didn't ask about learning to program an engine they asked about making a game.. Strictly speaking you don't need to learn any of what you just listed to make a game.

 

 

Hi, I have recently been looking into how to make games  on pc. I have found the whole thing to be rather... overwhelmingohmy.png I was wondering if anyone could put it in easier to understand terms. I would like to make a 3d game, maybe horror, or even a game similar to "Dear Esther" (Just exploring nice looking enviroments) for starts. I would like to know what engine to use, and any basic knowledge I would need to learn to start making this. I know almost nothing about game making as of right now, so make it simple xD.

 

Thanks in advance. biggrin.png

 

If you are just interested in making a game focus on making a game and don't get too wrapped up in making an engine. If you're using Dear Esther as your reference point I'd say a bigger problem would be creating assets. It would be straightforward to create a world with an engine like Ogre or Unity3D combined with some competent Scenebuilder and physics engine. In fact Ogre has a Demo which is basically the core of what you need (ie camera moving around a void with objects scattered about). Anyways

 

Basic programming: Needed

 

Graphics and sound engines: needed unless you want to build it from scratch.

 

C++: Not necessarily needed. It helps with more complicated games and elaborate tasks and is the standard for mainstream commercial titles but other simpler languages are used or often preferred by beginners. For Ogre though you will be working with C++.

 

OpenGL: Not needed unless you want to be a graphics programmer. Your engine will take care of most everything.

 

Fancy math: not needed, just have a good grasp of college level math and you should be fine for nonexotic tasks.

 

Graphics program: For a decent Dear Esther clone be prepared to either do a lot of searching on the internet or for you or someone working with you to crack open and learn your way around copy of photoshop and a 3d graphics editor. Good luck with that. 3d graphics programs like Maya are harder to learn than programming IMO.



#14 foxefde   Members   -  Reputation: 143

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 03:36 AM

Simple 3D ?Dream more.

 

First learn ..uhm,maybe C# / C++

Second learn a little bit about 2D

THEN try Utility3D & create a game.


Edited by foxefde, 11 June 2013 - 03:36 AM.





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