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Linux Mint, anyone?


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#1 YodamanJer   Members   -  Reputation: 433

Posted 02 June 2013 - 10:37 PM

Hi all, 

I just had a play with Linux Mint today, and I fell in love with it! It feels like what Ubuntu used to be.

I just wonder if anyone has played with it, and what they like/dislike about it? Also, game development looks to be fairly easy on it as well (at least as easy as on Ubuntu), especially since Unity3D has the option to export to Linux (as well as GameMaker, though it's specifically for Ubuntu). I can't wait to dabble with it this week!

I used to run Ubuntu pretty frequently, but really started to hate the Unity interface after a while. I'm glad I found Linux Mint! Anybody else here use it, or another version of Linux they like?

 


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#2 latch   Members   -  Reputation: 632

Posted 02 June 2013 - 10:47 PM

My headless laptop runs Linux Mint and I like it. I also like Zorin- it's pretty licky chewy. I think its window manager is a modified gnome one.



#3 gdmarkou   Members   -  Reputation: 332

Posted 03 June 2013 - 12:44 AM

Same here. After a long journey through desktop managers (Unity, KDE 4.8, Gnome 3 -nononononoNO-, XFCE) when I saw Mint and cinnamon I felt like "home sweet home" smile.png

 



#4 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3718

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:17 AM

I've seen Mint through I haven't tested it on my own computer.

What I did test is a bunch of desktop environments with Debian. Used LXDE for months, then tested briefly Xfce, then Gnome 3 in fallback mode (normal Gnome 3 is a no go on my netbook) and right now, Enlightenment.

 

Surprisingly enough, while Enlightenment is the "prettiest" environment I had (everything is animated, anti aliased, with shadows and so on), it's also the fastest that I've tried. Its development was halted for years, and was recently picked up again, so it has some rough corners (better than LXDE though).

 

But it is very, very configurable, easy on the eyes and works pretty fast (which is a miracle considering that I'm running a single core Atom N450 and an ION 2). I do have some issues with the application menus. Things like Synaptic fail to load since there is something wrong with the launcher that grants root privileges, so I have to launch it myself from a root terminal.

 

I'm hoping that ppl will pick up on it since that probably means more up to date .deb packages :D

 

I've come to hate things that run on GTK nowadays, Synaptic? If I gave a floppy to a turtle and asked it to bring me a .deb file it would be faster. Gnome? The same. And so on...


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#5 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8165

Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:06 AM

I'm using it as well as a main workstation since last december. Cinnamon is a bit irritating because it seems to lack many basic features (especially relating to dual monitor management) but it has been quite enjoyable so far (and it runs perfectly). I think I'll stick with it for a while, but for my next distro I think I'll go for a different desktop environment.


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#6 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4515

Posted 03 June 2013 - 04:20 AM

I tried it a week or so ago, too. At first look, it was stunning: Insert disk, and it works, and works well.

Exactly like Ubuntu used to be before "Unity".

 

Cinnamon looks and feels very nice, fast, responsive, well-designed and modern, but not modern in a way that hurts. This is somewhat like a mixture between Gnome2, LXDE, and old KDE, with desktop effects if you want them. Pretty well-made.

 

However, I quickly found disappointing that to all appearances the network sources aren't in sync with what the installer thinks, or... whatever?

In any case, Synaptic (or apt-get) doesn't work for me. Though admittedly, I saw the same thing with Debian testing at the same time (stable works fine, but I'd like to install redis-server, and guess what, stable doesn't have it...). Maybe they use the same repos (or the repos are partially copies of each other, who knows).

I'll have a look again in 2-3 weeks, hopefully that's just an intermediary thing, maybe someone only forgot to update a version number or such.



#7 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4766

Posted 03 June 2013 - 05:38 AM

My headless laptop runs Linux Mint and I like it. I also like Zorin- it's pretty licky chewy. I think its window manager is a modified gnome one.

Heh, Mint is Ubuntu with a different shell. If you're running it headless (ie. no shell), you're just running Ubuntu.
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer

#8 YodamanJer   Members   -  Reputation: 433

Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:05 AM

This thread did get posted after all! It said the server failed while I was writing it last night, and I couldn't get back on the site. Weird!
 

Synaptic (or apt-get) doesn't work for me.

 
Hmm, I'll have to look into the problems with apt-get before I go ahead and install it on a separate partition. Like you said, someone may have just forgotten to update something, and perhaps they'll fix it soon enough!

 

Cinnamon is a bit irritating because it seems to lack many basic features (especially relating to dual monitor management) but it has been quite enjoyable so far (and it runs perfectly).

I'll have to look into that as well. I do remember having some difficulty setting up dual monitors with Ubuntu. I could never quite get the other one to run at the resolution I wanted because it kept thinking it was at its native resolution. I'm not running dual monitors, so it's not a terribly big concern at the moment. tongue.png

What surprised me the most about Mint is how much faster than Ubuntu it was, and I was even running it off of a live CD! It seemed more fluid. Also, even though it's just aesthetics, the wallpapers are amazing!


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#9 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8165

Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:40 AM

I'll have to look into that as well. I do remember having some difficulty setting up dual monitors with Ubuntu. I could never quite get the other one to run at the resolution I wanted because it kept thinking it was at its native resolution. I'm not running dual monitors, so it's not a terribly big concern at the moment.

 

Well the problem for me is that Cinnamon has no virtualization feature and always runs in "external head" mode, which is what you want when doing powerpoint presentations but not what you want when using both screens as a single large monitor. Having the taskbar stretch out onto both screens is what I am missing. I know, sounds rather trivial, but it's just annoying to have the taskbar only on the first monitor. That said the nice side-effect is that fullscreen stuff only occupies one screen out of the two instead of cutting at the bezel, which is often better. So it's just a quality of life issue, I can live with it.

 

I tried to use the AMD drivers for Eyefinity like on my Windows system but they broke everything, so I gave up. The open source Radeon drivers, even though they lack full hardware acceleration, are wonderfully stable and that's all I ask for.

 

There's actually a github issue opened about this. It's been almost two years..

 

 

What surprised me the most about Mint is how much faster than Ubuntu it was, and I was even running it off of a live CD! It seemed more fluid. Also, even though it's just aesthetics, the wallpapers are amazing!

 

Me too. First time I booted it from my crappy flash stick it was really fast, and the installation was nice too. I especially did not miss not having Ubuntu's ridiculous "installing those 500MB language packs that you will never use but for some reason I need to download them anyway, you know, just in case you happen to speak all 177 languages, never mind that I actually asked what language you wanted five minutes ago". Now on my SSD it's beautiful. It takes about ~1 second for the desktop to appear and the system is ready for use smile.png


Edited by Bacterius, 03 June 2013 - 07:43 AM.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#10 latch   Members   -  Reputation: 632

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:45 AM

My headless laptop runs Linux Mint and I like it. I also like Zorin- it's pretty licky chewy. I think its window manager is a modified gnome one.

Heh, Mint is Ubuntu with a different shell. If you're running it headless (ie. no shell), you're just running Ubuntu.

I was speaking hardwarewise- see here: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/643909-gah-my-laptop-screen-is-cracked/



#11 Net Gnome   Members   -  Reputation: 769

Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:36 AM

Personnally, I've never really liked Mint. It just felt -like- Ubuntu, but not quite... like something was off and wrong. It also didnt help Mint's degree of polish is lacking (not saying Ubuntu's is perfect)... I personally use Xubuntu (XFCE Ubuntu build), which like Lubuntu (LXDE Ubuntu build), dumps Unity for a much much more performant Desktop Environment. XFCE is an extremely fast Dekstop Environment, and i've continually been happy with its performance. If you're looking for a gnome-2 like desktop, its hard to get anything faster (well, perhaps LXDE and or OpenBox ;) )(benchmarks over at Phoronix). However, it will beat OpenBox and LXDE for looks ;)

#12 Promit   Moderators   -  Reputation: 6113

Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:53 AM

Mint is my go-to distro for when I need Linux. They've managed to avoid doing anything stupid to the interface (*ahem*) and things generally seem well supported.



#13 YodamanJer   Members   -  Reputation: 433

Posted 03 June 2013 - 04:36 PM


>What surprised me the most about Mint is how much faster than Ubuntu it was, and I was even running it off of a live CD! It seemed more fluid. Also, even though it's just aesthetics, the wallpapers are amazing!

 
Me too. First time I booted it from my crappy flash stick it was really fast, and the installation was nice too. I especially did not miss not having Ubuntu's ridiculous "installing those 500MB language packs that you will never use but for some reason I need to download them anyway, you know, just in case you happen to speak all 177 languages, never mind that I actually asked what language you wanted five minutes ago". Now on my SSD it's beautiful. It takes about ~1 second for the desktop to appear and the system is ready for use smile.png


Haha, yeah, I hated having all language packages installed. Good grief!

And holy crap on that boot time! I might have to install an SSD in my tower for Mint... that'd be so awesome to have a section of my computer, ready in less than 5 seconds!

Edited by YodamanJer, 03 June 2013 - 04:37 PM.

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#14 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9614

Posted 04 June 2013 - 06:12 AM

We tried it out at work for a while, but every revision seemed to muck with the boot process, and the overall stability was abysmal.

 

Admittedly, that was a couple of years back, so the situation may have improved since then.


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#15 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5772

Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:32 AM

We tried it out at work for a while, but every revision seemed to muck with the boot process, and the overall stability was abysmal.

 

Admittedly, that was a couple of years back, so the situation may have improved since then.

 

I've been running it at work for a bit over a year now, everything just works and it starts a heck of a lot faster than Windows7 (allthough i only reboot to switch OS when i have to test in a proper windows install (rather than a VM) so it might just be that my win install gets rusty from the neglect)


Edited by SimonForsman, 04 June 2013 - 08:33 AM.

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#16 YodamanJer   Members   -  Reputation: 433

Posted 04 June 2013 - 03:41 PM

Hmm, well, I seem to be having some issues getting to recognize my sound... that's not good. :P

I'll tinker with it some more. You've always got to tinker with Linux, no matter what distro you use!


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#17 latch   Members   -  Reputation: 632

Posted 04 June 2013 - 05:00 PM

That's for sure. You prolly need a closed source driver for it.



#18 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9614

Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:58 PM

You prolly need a closed source driver for it.

Or a sacrifice.

 

Goats may work, if you don't have a handy supply of virgins.


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#19 latch   Members   -  Reputation: 632

Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:55 PM

Do the goats have to be virgins?



#20 YodamanJer   Members   -  Reputation: 433

Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:21 PM

Actually I got it to work. It was trying to go through my headphones (which were plugged directly into my PC and not through my speakers), so I just had to unplug them. Simple, silly mistake. :P


My website, featuring all kinds of geeky things! yodamanjer.com

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