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Torque 3D vs Unity 3D


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#1 zigzak   Members   -  Reputation: 109

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 11:39 AM

Hi, I'm working on C + + for two weeks. Previously working with Unity3D. Torque3D distributed as open source. A lot of people think that these two competing engine. Did you think Torque3D quality motor? Do I use?



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#2 CJ_COIMBRA   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 789

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:14 PM

Exclude me of this lot of people that think Torque3D competes with Unity3D. In my opinion Unity3D is superior.



#3 Joshhua5   Members   -  Reputation: 436

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:46 PM

I've been using Torque3D at my college and ultimately it is the better one  (Not out of the box)  because you have the source code to the engine, you can make it do Anything!. Out of the box with no source code Unity seems to be superior (I haven't used it).

From the beginning Torque is actually quite lengthy to get simple things to work. A lecturer said to me "It took me a week to do something in Torque that unity did in a few hours"
Personally if I was to make a game with it, I'd use Torque because I have experience there and the license allows complete control of everything.
If i was starting off I'd try unity to see how it goes, I'm not sure how the licensed work, but I do know you have to credit Unity unlike Torque.

 

In addition to get ALL the features of Unity you need to get Unity Pro ($$$$), features which Torque already has for well you guessed it Free.



#4 zigzak   Members   -  Reputation: 109

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 04:12 AM

Mainly in Unity, or torque?



#5 CJ_COIMBRA   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 789

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 04:58 AM

Recently Unity has gone free for iOS and Android deploy which is also a big plus. You can easily jump from one platform to another and maximize your downloads. That's what make me stick around with Unity.



#6 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7100

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 05:34 AM


Hi, I'm working on C + + for two weeks. Previously working with Unity3D. Torque3D distributed as open source. A lot of people think that these two competing engine. Did you think Torque3D quality motor? Do I use?

You need to check your requirements. There are lot of engines available, even unreal engine is free for limited income. Therefor check your requirements:

1. Is the game project free or commercial ?

2. If it is commercial, is it still feaseable to pay royalities later to get some really superio engine ?

3. What platforms to I need to support ? (iOS, Webbrowser, Win, Linux, Android ...)

4. What tool support do I need ?

5. Do I really need to modify the engine code ?

6. How many reference game projects have been release on the given engine ?

7. What is the support of the given engine ? Must I pay for special support, is the communtiy large enough to receive some help ?



#7 HyperV   Members   -  Reputation: 765

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 05:34 AM

Hi

 

Torgue 3D is OPEN SOURCE ,you can do whatever you want.

Torque 3D has alot more features then Unity installed already , on Unity you need to download them and some of them you need to pay for it or even you have to switch to a 

Pro account and that is gonna cost you 1500 dollars.

 

Unity has one good feature that they release a few months ago that you now can deploy for the mobile devices.

 

 

i've used Unity once for a project.

from my experiance i hate Unity.



#8 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6034

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 05:37 AM

I've been using Torque3D at my college and ultimately it is the better one  (Not out of the box)  because you have the source code to the engine, you can make it do Anything!. Out of the box with no source code Unity seems to be superior (I haven't used it).

From the beginning Torque is actually quite lengthy to get simple things to work. A lecturer said to me "It took me a week to do something in Torque that unity did in a few hours"
Personally if I was to make a game with it, I'd use Torque because I have experience there and the license allows complete control of everything.
If i was starting off I'd try unity to see how it goes, I'm not sure how the licensed work, but I do know you have to credit Unity unlike Torque.

 

In addition to get ALL the features of Unity you need to get Unity Pro ($$$$), features which Torque already has for well you guessed it Free.

 

Overall i'd say Unity pro is superior to Torque, the lack of sourcecode(you can get a sourcecode license for Unity as well but it costs extra) is a disadvantage but its not a big one in most situations since the engine is flexible enough on its own and the high productivity is extremely valuable(We use off the shelf engines to boost productivity afterall).

 

The free version of Unity however (Which really is the one that competes directly with Torque) is a bit harder to compare, it has some nice productivity advantages as well as automatic iOS and Android support (you get those for free now as well) but the crippled renderer can be a huge disadvantage on the desktop for certain types of games.

 

Thus my recommendation:

 

For mobile games or PC desktop games that don't need an advanced renderer: Go with the free version of Unity. (unless you have over $100k annual turnover allready in which case you have to buy the pro version anyway)

For Desktop PC games that need an advanced renderer: it depends on your budget, Torque is the cheapest(since its 100% free) good option imo, UDK and CryEngine start out cheap but have rather high royalty costs once/if you start selling well and Unity Pro costs $1500 per seat. (which can quickly add up to quite a lot if you got a large team), If you are just starting out then it is often preferable to not spend a lot of money up front (Your first few games aren't likely to pull in large amounts of money)


Edited by SimonForsman, 12 June 2013 - 05:50 AM.

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#9 Dwarf King   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1801

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 01:08 PM

I have used Torque 3D full time for a year now. I would say Torque 3D, not because it is superior but... Okay here we go:

  • Torque 3D is free(try to imagine what it would cost if 10 people had to buy a license for like 1500 $)
  • You get the source code(sooner or later you want that access, trust me)
  • No payment for source code access(try to think about the price you need to pay if you need Unity access)
  • You are free like in FREE to hack and bend Torque 3D in any way you want and no damn royalties
  • You get an awesome community with great hacks and resources for making games
  • You are not dependent on other than your teams own programming abilities(maybe at first bad but later on a true investment)
  • You will learn a great deal of how an engine is put together(a great knowledge to get)

Last I would say this:

"Give a man a fish and he can eat, learn him how to fish and he can survive" wink.png

 

You want the Torque 3D engine in the long run, Unity3D is great but it is like peeing in the pants on a cold winter day. In the beginning you feel great and then you soon realize that it is getting colder again. You need to get under the hood of a game engine in order to stay over the water in this business. 

 

All the best


"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education"

Albert Einstein

"It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education"

Albert Einstein

 


#10 Eric Preisz   Members   -  Reputation: 111

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 12:15 PM

@Dwarf King - GarageGames marketing is wondering if we could use your pee in your pants analogy in future marketing material. We've said the same before, but never so eloquently. 



#11 Dwarf King   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1801

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 06:37 AM

@Dwarf King - GarageGames marketing is wondering if we could use your pee in your pants analogy in future marketing material. We've said the same before, but never so eloquently. 

Hi Eric, good to see you around here smile.png  I have never claimed any copyright for what I write on gamedev.net so feel free to use what I wrote in the post above.

 

Best,

 

Dwarf King 


"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education"

Albert Einstein

"It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education"

Albert Einstein

 


#12 Krathoon   Members   -  Reputation: 132

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 04:31 PM

From programming professionally for ten years, I tend to agree with Dwarf King's points about Torque. It is better to have an engine that you can dig into and customize, it allows you to flex and expand your programming skills. Also, you get to learn some game engine design. I am new to Torque and game programming, but it seems like this is wise place to start and there is no real financial risk.



#13 YodamanJer   Members   -  Reputation: 444

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 08:28 PM

Hmm, Torque3D looks quite interesting! I'm gonna look into it as well, I use Unity for some things but I'd much prefer an engine like Torque!


My website, featuring all kinds of geeky things! yodamanjer.com

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#14 MisteRnoOrOnha   Members   -  Reputation: 241

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 04:11 PM

And Ogre3d?



#15 Aldacron   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 3130

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 09:48 PM

And Ogre3d?

 

That's a rendering engine, not a complete game engine. When you go that route, you have to fill in the gaps for the other aspects of the game that you need: audio, networking, physics, and so on. There are plenty of open source libraries out there that you can cobble together to use with OGRE, so it's not that big of a deal. There are several pros and cons to this approach. One big advantage here is that you can mix and match libraries and not include anything you don't need, particularly useful if your game is limited in scope. One particular disadvantage is that you don't get the convenience of the built-in editors provided by monolith frameworks like Torque and Unity, and that's a big one for many types of games.

So I think comparing OGRE specifically with Torque and Unity isn't very useful. However, it is appropriate to compare the approach of using monolith packages with that of putting components together piecemeal.



#16 Aleksa   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 12:27 PM

I would go with Unity, but it is your choice...



#17 IcedCrow   Members   -  Reputation: 264

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 01:15 PM

Do you want to craft a game or do you want to craft / maintain an engine?  That is a very important factor,.


For more on my wargaming title check out my dev blog at http://baelsoubliette.wordpress.com/

#18 SymLinked   Members   -  Reputation: 845

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 04:49 PM

I do like Unity, and I really like their new mobile deployment. But for PC games, Torque 3D (IMO) beats anything that doesn't cost millions. And even in the case of engines that cost millions, it isn't too far behind.






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