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3D Object Manipulation Mobile Game Development Framework


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#1 DarrenVortex   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 02:05 AM

I know I know it's a pretty long title! smile.png

Well I guess I should say Hi first since I'm a newbie in Gamedev.net and this is my first post...

Oh well, I guess I'll go right to the point then!

 

I'm a programmer. I've explored many aspects of programming so I know basic computer science stuff (I'm actually language-independent now!), and now I want to make a game! Luckily, I have a designer who's made me a 3D spaceship in 3Ds Max, and right now all I really want to do is:

 

1. Create an phone game app (Preferably compilable for both Android & iOS)

2. Import the spaceship model (I have it in .obj format right now but max can convert to some other formats as well.)

3. Make it move up and down!

 

I have many options in front of me: Cocos3d, Unity3d, jMonkeyEngine, and similar libraries / frameworks. But I don't really know where to start. I've tried some but haven't quite found the ideal choice yet. Things that affect my choice of framework are:

 

1. I hate Unity since it's GUI dependent, and I'm a low-level programmer (I see the world in text-based!). I don't use IDEs for app development, just a text editor and a Console + simply reading the doc and calling the APIs from code. I just want a framework / lib, not an entire SDK.

2. I'm still a beginner in game dev, so simple-to-follow and complete documentation and an easy-to-start-with library.

3. Easy 3D Support

 

Now with these said, what do the masters suggest me to use?


Edited by DarrenVortex, 18 June 2013 - 03:13 PM.


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#2 shaggyred   Members   -  Reputation: 121

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 04:38 AM

I created an account just to post a reply on this one because I was in the same position once...

 

About 3-4 years ago, I was in a similar position as you, wanting to get into 3D game dev on iOS and hunting around.  I had never done 3D dev before, so I tried a whole bunch of things.  As like you, I also didn't like the idea of a full IDE/GUI etc such that Unity appeared to be.

 

So I tried a bunch and I ended up playing with Sio2 (http://sio2interactive.com)  It wasn't bad.  C++ really isn't my thing anymore, so it took me a bit to get into it, but within a week or so I was able to get some basic models imported, manipulated, etc.  I was also getting totally lost in all the minutia of making the engine work.

 

And then I thought to myself... am I doing this as an exercise to be a better programmer or am I doing this to make a game?

 

I wanted to make a game.  So I dumped Sio2, downloaded Unity and never looked back (and have since released 3 games that have reached #1 in at least one of its game categories and one #1 on the iPad store.)

 

Keep in mind that although Unity presents you with all sorts of buttons and windows and other fancy graphical bits, if you really wanted to, you could almost entirely eschew all of that, limiting yourself to just an all code-based game dev workflow.  Unity is, if nothing else, just a pipeline to tie together 3D assets and the game engine (which you can almost entirely control with code.)  Generally speaking, you just setup the scene in Unity's UI (layout, lighting, etc.) but everything is completely controlled with code.

 

So before you dismiss programs like Unity, Unreal and others of its like because they're a "GUI", I would suggest you actually read up on what they do and how they do it.  In reality, you'll find that they require almost just as much code (written outside of an IDE as much as you like) but take care of all the messy and inherently visual bits like handling 3D assets, turning them into worthwhile levels and making them beautiful... which is exactly what you need in a 3D gaming IDE!



#3 MarekKnows.com   Members   -  Reputation: 448

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:58 AM

I suggest you check out Marmalade: http://www.madewithmarmalade.com/

 

You can write your code once, and then target it to build for BlackBerry, Android, and iOS platforms


---
Free C++, OpenGL, and Game Development Video Tutorials @
www.MarekKnows.com
Play my free games: Ghost Toast, Zing, Jewel Thief


#4 runonthespot   Members   -  Reputation: 169

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 08:19 AM

+1 Unity3d.  Also a programmer background (12+ years), language independent.  Scene view is almost optional, but mostly it just spares you the grind of managing basic views.

I love it most because of the documentation.  Every part of the API has a page and a good C# example of how to use it.  That factor alone makes it programmer easy-mode.



#5 Sooshi   Members   -  Reputation: 149

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 06:35 PM

+1 Unity3d.  Also a programmer background (12+ years), language independent.  Scene view is almost optional, but mostly it just spares you the grind of managing basic views.
I love it most because of the documentation.  Every part of the API has a page and a good C# example of how to use it.  That factor alone makes it programmer easy-mode.


+1 As visual as I am, I am all code based. Unity also allows me to be free and concentrate on design.

#6 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19757

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 11:50 AM

Another Unity vote.

 

You start out saying you are a programmer.  That is fine.

 

Then you describe doing the job of a designer.  That is also fine.

 

Games need both.

 

 

The visual runtime aspect of Unity is there to help designers.  It is not the only view of the game, and it is a view that programmers will use only to test their code.  Programmers using Unity will see all the code they want.

 

Your game will probably also need more models, animations, vfx, audio, and other elements.  You say you have only a single model, but one model and an up/down animation generally does not complete a full 3D game.  Very few 3D games can be implemented with a single 3D model and no animation.  Unity makes it easy to mix all of those components.

 

Either that, or you can write your own engine, decode your own animations, write your own animation control system, implement an audio library and add hookups between animation scripts and code.  And on, and on, and on.  It is much easier to go with an established engine like Unity.


Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#7 Sooshi   Members   -  Reputation: 149

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 10:01 PM

Another Unity vote.
 
You start out saying you are a programmer.  That is fine.
 
Then you describe doing the job of a designer.  That is also fine.
 
Games need both.
 
 
The visual runtime aspect of Unity is there to help designers.  It is not the only view of the game, and it is a view that programmers will use only to test their code.  Programmers using Unity will see all the code they want.
 
Your game will probably also need more models, animations, vfx, audio, and other elements.  You say you have only a single model, but one model and an up/down animation generally does not complete a full 3D game.  Very few 3D games can be implemented with a single 3D model and no animation.  Unity makes it easy to mix all of those components.
 
Either that, or you can write your own engine, decode your own animations, write your own animation control system, implement an audio library and add hookups between animation scripts and code.  And on, and on, and on.  It is much easier to go with an established engine like Unity.


+1111111




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