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Creating a game - what skills would I need to recruit?


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#1 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:42 AM

Hi,

 

I am looking to have a game developed and am willing to pay for services, however I'd appreciate some advice on what skill-sets I'd be looking to hire.

 

Let presume I want to create a:

 

- Generic 2D side-scrolling shooter in Unity 3D

- Neon style graphics (like http://bit.ly/12degHs )

- Android/iOS

 

What kind of skills would I need to look for?

Obviously I'd need a Unity programmer but would this art style (Neon) require a 2D artist or would it be a model? Would I need an animator or could this be done via code?

 

Sorry if these are dumb questions, but I guess you have to start somewhere.

 

Thanks in advance



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#2 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5952

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:09 AM

It looks like 2D art, possibly vector.

 

If you use 2D artwork most 2D artists will be able to do animation as well.

 

If you don't have any experience i'd recommend paying an established studio to make your game for you rather than trying to recruit a team yourself.


I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#3 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:19 AM

Thanks for the reply Simon smile.png

 

I don't have any experience, but in my head I'd like to manage this from start to finish to gain that experience - I'm not sure what I'd gain from hiring a studio to do the work. I have many game ideas that I'd like to develop, but I want to start with something very simple just for the learning curve.

 

I'm guessing that this would be vector, but I'm not 100% sure - for example the spaceship I have in mind would have a neon trail behind it and I don't think this could be done via artwork?

 

Would the first stage be to recruit a developer and for them to tell me what they require?

 

Edit: I've already had a proof of concept developed, but the developer lost interest after a week unsure.png


Edited by BudBrain, 24 June 2013 - 06:21 AM.


#4 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5952

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:02 AM

Thanks for the reply Simon smile.png

 

I don't have any experience, but in my head I'd like to manage this from start to finish to gain that experience - I'm not sure what I'd gain from hiring a studio to do the work. I have many game ideas that I'd like to develop, but I want to start with something very simple just for the learning curve.

 

I'm guessing that this would be vector, but I'm not 100% sure - for example the spaceship I have in mind would have a neon trail behind it and I don't think this could be done via artwork?

 

Would the first stage be to recruit a developer and for them to tell me what they require?

 

Edit: I've already had a proof of concept developed, but the developer lost interest after a week unsure.png

 

Trails are normally done using particles (The programmer you get should be able to sort that out).

 

If the developers you recruit lose interest quickly you're not paying them enough. This is your dream, not theirs, you have to pay them accordingly, if you don't pay them you have to give them something else of value. (Contribute with skills they don't have, give them creative input (make it their game as well as yours), etc), most developers who are capable of making a game have more ideas than they have time to implement, it is quite natural for them to lose interest in ideas that aren't their own.


Edited by SimonForsman, 24 June 2013 - 08:07 AM.

I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#5 HyperV   Members   -  Reputation: 698

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:04 AM

hi

 

First you'll need a C# Unity programmer (NOT JAVASCRIPT) and also he needs to know how to solve the Math problems :P

Second you can hire an Artist and a Game Designer or you hire one that can do both (hitting 2 birds with one stone).

Third you can also Hire a company like what  

SimonForsman

say's but be warned that it can be a very expensive deal 

 

My tip is hire young people.20-25 years old :D

i hope i've informed you enough :D

 

HyperV



#6 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:06 AM

If the developers you recruit lose interest quickly you're not paying them enough.

 

I think that's a great quote!

 

I'll work on the assumption then that I need to hire a developer first. Would you recommend looking on a site like oDesk or a gaming forum (such as this one or the Unity forums) and recruit there?

 

Thanks



#7 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:09 AM

Hi HyperV, thanks for your input.

 

When you say game designer, do you mean an artist who oversees the artistic direction of the entire game and provides the graphics or someone who makes design/feature decisions?



#8 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5952

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:11 AM

 

If the developers you recruit lose interest quickly you're not paying them enough.

 

I think that's a great quote!

 

I'll work on the assumption then that I need to hire a developer first. Would you recommend looking on a site like oDesk or a gaming forum (such as this one or the Unity forums) and recruit there?

 

Thanks

 

 

If you're serious about it, contact a lawyer, form a company, get an office and get proper employees, you can recruit fresh graduates from your local university, the good ones will allready have a few games to show off.

 

If you plan on recruiting cheap labor online without formal contracts you're in for a rough ride, those teams only tend to work out if the person leading it is doing the majority of the work, you cannot expect long term commitment without a contract and a solid salary from anyone but yourself


Edited by SimonForsman, 24 June 2013 - 08:15 AM.

I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#9 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:17 AM

I am serious about having a game developed and have produced (via outsourcing) software products that have sold well, however my passion/dream is games.

 

That said, I don't have the kind of money to get an office or hire full-time employees.



#10 HyperV   Members   -  Reputation: 698

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:17 AM

Hi HyperV, thanks for your input.

 

When you say game designer, do you mean an artist who oversees the artistic direction of the entire game and provides the graphics or someone who makes design/feature decisions?

the one who's doing the job :D (designing the game from concept to level design ect...)



#11 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:32 AM

What I meant was that (from my limited knowledge) the term 'designer' means two different roles, the first being artist 'design' and the other being game/feature 'design'.

 

If you don't mean artwork, I guess that'd be my role as I have a clear idea of what I'm looking for in terms of features/game-play.



#12 lithos   Members   -  Reputation: 413

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 02:37 PM

Right now is actually a great time to hire the 20-25 somethings.   Lots of people just getting out of college looking for some freelance work to keep them occupied and fed while they work on job applications.   Which means that you're looking at people who have never been proven, required to be paid before milestones, and are less prepared than their peers(depending on how late in the school year it actually is).    So it's pretty hit or miss.

_________

As for your questions I need to just say something worth being said for these types of questions.   If you don't know where to start you're not ready to, you should start by joining another team.

 

The bright side about joining a hobby/pre-indy team is that most of them will fail in a short while.   Meaning you could go through 5 or 8 in a year, which means you get a lot of chances to learn from other's mistakes AND know the most productive people who are willing to work on hobby/pre-indy teams.



#13 rpiller   Members   -  Reputation: 657

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 02:51 PM

Hey Bud,

 

I won't make the game for you, but I've been programming for 12+ years and doing hobby game development for that entire time. I know enough about all the aspects about game development to effectively run a small project, which I'm doing now for an indie free community project, but I'd be available to hear out your plan and management thoughts and share my experiences to help make it possibly more successful or at least for you to hear the thoughts of a person who has been working on hobby games for a long time.

 

I'm very realistic in game development and honest so I'll call a spade a spade and won't sugarcoat anything but in a respectful way.

 

I have a simple mobile game that I made called "My Whacky Moles" for iOS/Android, which has an article in MacLife this month about gaming for a good cause because I donate a portion of the projects to charity, so I took my hobby game development to the next step and am willing to help/share what I learned if you want.



#14 Álvaro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 12365

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:51 PM


My tip is hire young people.20-25 years old

 

I just want to point out that age discrimination in hiring practices is illegal in the US. Just saying.



#15 BudBrain   Members   -  Reputation: 94

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 04:34 PM

Thanks for all the responses and for not shooting me down, I realise this is probably a very common question.

 

After receiving some good advice, I'm going to return to the game design document that I started a while back and go from there.

 

If you don't know where to start you're not ready to, you should start by joining another team.

 

Thanks for your reply buddy. I appreciate where you're coming from, however in my defence (and without trying to sound too clever) I have already seen a 'reasonably' successful software (non-game) product from design through to launch and I've been a full-time developer for over 15+ years, plus I've been an avid gamer for over 20 years. This thread is my attempt to seek clarification from those who are more experienced in this industry before I start to seek the skill-sets required.

I don't believe there would be a huge benefit in me joining an existing team, unless there is a team of coders/artists out there without a game to develop. Please do correct me if I'm being naive here? unsure.png

 

rpiller - Will send you a message smile.png



#16 lithos   Members   -  Reputation: 413

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:32 PM

If you can't see a second of yourself being useful...   You have a lot work ahead of yourself to prove your usefulness to a team, especially since you said you didn't want to use monetary incentives.

 

Game design/production really isn't easier to learn than any dozen of other things you don't want to (programming/art/sound/whatever).   If you don't believe me when I was looking at Link pushing a boulder in Windwaker I only noticed 7 things going on, someone I'd call a designer readily pointed out 4 or 5 more (and annoyed me the rest of the night with other things they started to notice about rocks).   That's just pushing a boulder, sure it's a core+frequent mechanic but it's still just pushing a silly rock.  Essentially argument started from my programmer self declaring designers useless in small teams.



#17 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2010

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 10:35 AM

Hi,

 

I am looking to have a game developed and am willing to pay for services, however I'd appreciate some advice on what skill-sets I'd be looking to hire.

 

Let presume I want to create a:

 

- Generic 2D side-scrolling shooter in Unity 3D

- Neon style graphics (like http://bit.ly/12degHs )

- Android/iOS

 

What kind of skills would I need to look for?

Obviously I'd need a Unity programmer but would this art style (Neon) require a 2D artist or would it be a model? Would I need an animator or could this be done via code?

 

Sorry if these are dumb questions, but I guess you have to start somewhere.

 

Thanks in advance

 

I suggest you try some programming (make pong) and do some artwork, also. It's important for a designer to actually understand how hard these things are so that their expectations aren't unreasonable.


Edited by superman3275, 29 June 2013 - 10:37 AM.

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