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Are these projects some things I cannot abandon, no matter how incomplete it is?


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#1 tom_mai78101   Members   -  Reputation: 568

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:31 PM

I have put some projects up on another forum, just so a few acquaintances of mine can try them out. Below are the given links to each project. For those who are interested, please test them out, and if possible, do provide feedback in this thread. Thank you!

 

Pokémon Walking Algorithm (Working title, not complete) [Game, Java]

5-way Bluetooth Relay App (Requires 5 devices for testing, which I don't have) [App, Android]

Marble Run (Complete, albeit a few minor bugs) [Game, Android]

Rest Timer (Complete) [App, Android]

 

I was wondering if these are eligible for my portfolio, as in, since these projects (Marble Run is a large project, for me) are done in my college years, do they mean anything else I haven't seen yet, other than that they are currently abandoned in my portfolio? Should I not forgo "tossing into the bin" mindset for these projects?

 

I do not have a general threshold for what goes into my portfolio, nor do I understand what a portfolio should do besides keeping projects in one place. :(

 

Please tell me any suggestions to what I should do to transition around this, if possible. Sort of like, a minor change to something A, or a big helpful tip about something B. Thanks for your feedback, even if you're not replying. Everything you say or don't say is appreciated, regardless if I'm getting blamed on or something. <3



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#2 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8315

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 01:03 PM

Well I don't have an Android so I can't test most of your projects (I don't have much time right now anyway) but these are some generic opinions about portfolios:

 


I do not have a general threshold for what goes into my portfolio, nor do I understand what a portfolio should do besides keeping projects in one place

 

A portfolio isn't a code repository to store all your stuff. It's a hall of fame of your masterpieces to show to potential employers, used to optimize your chances of being hired, as well as generally documenting your skills in the best possible light. You should probably only put your very best projects there, and they need to be reasonably complete, e.g. they don't need to be utterly flawless but you want them to at least be functioning on some level and demonstrating something that you wish to emphasize such as gameplay elements, good performance, elegant art, interesting music, etc..

 

Don't put too much in your portfolio, especially very similar projects. They are not supposed to be code bases (though they can act as such, e.g. a github account you can use for effectively programming while still acting as a decent portfolio by making a good README.md file containing an overview of such and such project).

 

Never put trivial stuff in your portfolio, e.g. a two-line code snippet, unless it is ridiculously clever and earth-shattering. Similarly, don't put things you are not proud of in it (for this, there's always the Coding Horrors subforum wink.png)

 

I am not sure there is a "general threshold" for portfolios but I think if you sit down for a while and consider how much work project A was and if you think you learnt a lot from it, you'll know whether to put it in your portfolio. Just picture a future employer briefly scanning it and what he would see/think). Also it probably comes with experience - no portfolio is perfect and it's just something we all have to refine as time goes on (especially once you start working on other projects, you may find some of your old stuff obsolete and remove it from your portfolio to make place for something new - remember huge overbloated portfolios are not as effective as concise but well-rounded ones).


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis





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