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What programming language to use for making games?


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#1 shinobubu   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:00 PM

I have mild experience in C++, C#, and XNA. But I don't know if those are the most up-to-date languages for making a good game. Not saying it isn't possible to make a good game in them but I would like to know if there are better languages out there. I heard flash is really easy to use and works better than XNA.



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#2 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4073

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:30 PM

"works better" in which sense?


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#3 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6053

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:33 PM

Flash is a downloadable security hole that is on a rapid path to extinction. (I personally hope it dies quickly)

 

C++ and C# are both popular options, XNA is not a language, its just a framework primarily made to allow anyone to make games using C# for the xbox360 in a way that doesn't compromise the security of the system, it is pretty tied to the xbox360 and thus can't take advantage of modern PC hardware and Microsoft has announced that they won't release any more XNA versions so it will remain as it is today but it does work great if you only need DX9 functionality. SharpDX,SlimDX and OpenTK are up to date options for C# and Unity3D is a pretty solid modern engine that lets you use C# (You could also use UnityScript or Boo with it). There is also MonoGame and Microsoft might possibly release something nice that uses C# for their upcoming console.

 

C++ is still the most common language to write game engines in(it is probably the least painful language to work with if you need low level access) but its popularity when it comes to writing high level game logic is fading. (Higher level languages such as Python and Lua are gaining popularity in that area quite rapidly).

 

My recommendation is:

If you're making your own engine or a game from scratch, go with C++ and only add scripting support if you think you'll benefit from it. (For large games you will benefit from having high level scripting support but for smaller games it is quite likely that it will take more effort to add scripting support than you'll save by having it)

If you're making a game using an existing engine, pick an engine with the functionality and platform support you need and use whichever language it supports.


Edited by SimonForsman, 09 July 2013 - 04:35 PM.

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#4 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1394

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:35 PM

There is no such thing as a better language. The languages I have used have its up and downs in terms of the level of learning curve, setting up complex environments for the game, etc.

 

Challenge to learn more languages. They have their own quirks. For games, any languages that supports a graphics library will be enough to start writing games. You should also read and attempt to write your own game loop. Making sure main menu transitions to gameplay or any sort of features that is suppose to be after main menu.

 

 



#5 Andy474   Members   -  Reputation: 675

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 02:59 AM

The "Best" Language is the one you are more comfortable working in, if you have been writing in c# for 5 years, unless there is a professional reason for you to pick up C++, stick with C#.

 

 

 

 

N.B. XNA is NOT a Language, its is a framework written using the language C#.



#6 MarekKnows.com   Members   -  Reputation: 478

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 10:44 AM

Which platform are you wanting to target?  If you go with a mobile platform, then you may be restricted by your choices of languages.


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#7 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 12:19 PM

I have mild experience in C++, C#, and XNA. But I don't know if those are the most up-to-date languages for making a good game. Not saying it isn't possible to make a good game in them but I would like to know if there are better languages out there. I heard flash is really easy to use and works better than XNA.

 
 

The "Best" Language is the one you are more comfortable working in, if you have been writing in c# for 5 years, unless there is a professional reason for you to pick up C++, stick with C#.
 
 
 
 
N.B. XNA is NOT a Language, its is a framework written using the language C#.

 

The bolded 10000 times.

 

 

The only question I would ask you is this: Is there something about C# (the language) and XNA (the framework/library) that has hindered your game development? If no, then stick with it. Especially if you're a beginner or haven't made a completed game yet.

 

For the record, C#/XNA is more enough than and of high quality to make games. I definitely would not put Flash in the "Better" category when compared to C#/XNA.


Beginner in Game Development? Read here.
 
Super Mario Bros clone tutorial written in XNA 4.0 [MonoGame, ANX, and MonoXNA] by Scott Haley
 
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#8 lask1   Members   -  Reputation: 668

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 12:47 PM


For the record, C#/XNA is more enough than and of high quality to make games.

 

That is true however, XNA I do believe will no longer be supported. This makes XNA a poor desicion to learn on since you will just have to switch.

 

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/185894/Its_official_XNA_is_dead.php



#9 Andy474   Members   -  Reputation: 675

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 09:56 AM

 


For the record, C#/XNA is more enough than and of high quality to make games.

 

That is true however, XNA I do believe will no longer be supported. This makes XNA a poor desicion to learn on since you will just have to switch.

 

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/185894/Its_official_XNA_is_dead.php

 

Just becuse its "No longer supported" doesnt mean its dead. Its still works for both PC and XBLIA games, lots of tutorials and documentation out there, really easy to pick up, easy to distribute ...

 

All MS have said is "we are no longer updaing the software" which is fine ... there are (to my knowlage) no bugs which cause havok or hamper development in anyway.

 

The statment "This makes it a poor decision" is very very wrong imo, yes it is a poor choice of you want to make the next best indie game out there, or work on a high-end FPS etc.  but for research and learning as the OP is trying todo XNA is a fantastic choice.



#10 Dragonsoulj   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2086

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 10:05 AM


For games, any languages that supports a graphics library will be enough to start writing games.

 

and user input, otherwise it is just a movie. rolleyes.gif



#11 Ravyne   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7116

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 12:41 PM

 


For the record, C#/XNA is more enough than and of high quality to make games.

 

That is true however, XNA I do believe will no longer be supported. This makes XNA a poor desicion to learn on since you will just have to switch.

 

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/185894/Its_official_XNA_is_dead.php

 

 

That's sort of true. Microsoft won't be producing XNA 5.0, maintain 4.0 beyond fixing egregious bugs, or be making 4.0 available on any new platforms (e.g. Xbox One or Windows RT). However, it'll continue working as well as it does currently, on the platforms it already supports, for the foreseeable future.

 

Then, there's also MonoGame, an open-source implementation of the XNA API and other goodness. Microsoft officially made the XNA API spec open for use (as MonoGame has done), its still something of an ongoing work, but is complete/compatible enough for people to have used and continue to use it for real games. MonoGame itself is free to evolve the API if they choose.

 

In any case, game programming is about 5 percent API programming, maybe 10-20 percent higher-level frameworks -- the balance is pure programming and problems solving, and that's perfectly portable to any new language or API you might choose in the future.



#12 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4683

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 03:21 PM

Since you said "mildly experienced" (and also because of the fact that you actually have to ask), I recommend you use C#.

 

Though I'm a C++ fan and a real C# hater, C# is probably the best option for you. A mildly experienced C++ programmer is outright harmful. C++ is a nightmare if you don't know exactly what you're doing. If you want to use C++, you should be absolutely certain about it.

A mildly experienced C# programmer is mostly OK. It's much harder to completely fuck up using C# and you have a much more complete standard library (and a standard library that doesn't quite so easily lend to errors). So, all in all, you're much more likely to get a working game up and running if you use C#.

 

As for XNA, I wouldn't choose something of which I already know it's not going to be continued before I even start. While this doesn't automatically mean that XNA is "dead", it sure isn't a perfect going-in position. Even if MS currently says that they're going to support it (for... unknown time), it's some uncertainity. They might change opinion next year or with Windows 9 or with Windows 10, you don't know. Making a game can take years, so having something that has a somewhat "indefinite future" from the beginning isn't the best thing. Not when there's a good alternative, anyway.



#13 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 07:54 PM

I'm using RPG Maker at the moment. Well, I'm trying it out at least. To each his own.


Beginner in Game Development? Read here.
 
Super Mario Bros clone tutorial written in XNA 4.0 [MonoGame, ANX, and MonoXNA] by Scott Haley
 
If you have found any of the posts helpful, please show your appreciation by clicking the up arrow on those posts Posted Image
 
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#14 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1394

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 08:12 PM

 


For games, any languages that supports a graphics library will be enough to start writing games.

 

and user input, otherwise it is just a movie. rolleyes.gif

 

right! how could I have forgotten that...! nice save =]



#15 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1394

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 08:43 PM

I'm using RPG Maker at the moment. Well, I'm trying it out at least. To each his own.

I used rpg maker xp before I got into programming. I would say it is an awesome tool for designers: testing animation and prototyping area design and gameplay. Importing custom made scripts, sounds and adding sprite sheets into rpg maker is easy and the results are quick. 

 

Adding triggers for events to happen in game is fun and I think it does help somewhat in understanding how game logic would work in a small degree.






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