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How to learn game planning, game design?


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#1 hardcoreDEV   Members   -  Reputation: 120

Posted 14 July 2013 - 01:22 AM

using unity3d engine, 

 

As you know, for indie game developers, game design is everything, especially game design that can be sold!

It is problem of life or death, key point of divider whether wasting 6months~years of himself or few developers and thousand of money or successfully withdraw money big more than investment and time invested. 

I think All is up to [Game Design(Game planning)], isn't it? So what game should be maked? and can be maked? within few months?

So for solo developer or few guys team, what is good strategy? Who can do this job good? Who can teach this? 

Or how can learn this properly?

 

Or should I approach at business level, and get investors or funds, hiring game designer first? Yes this is maybe more good way, but, you know,  getting funds is hardest way.

 

Any opinions? Thanks. 


Edited by hardcoreDEV, 14 July 2013 - 01:26 AM.

www.perfectionofwisdom.com 

 


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#2 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 19409

Posted 14 July 2013 - 01:31 AM

You should probably try an iterative approach as suggested in "evolutionary design: a practical process for creating great game designs".

 

By initially creating small prototypes you avoid wasting time on flawed game ideas, and can then iteratively improve the better ideas to really "find the fun" and produce the best game possible.



#3 kseh   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2205

Posted 14 July 2013 - 05:45 AM

It seems to me that it isn't as much the design of a game that needs the investment of so much time but the code that brings the game to life. The design certainly sets the direction the code is going and is a determining factor in the enjoyability (and profitability) of a game but the coding is where your cost is going to be. So it seems to me that the best way to minimize risk is to find ways to speed up development or otherwise rapidly prototype your ideas.



#4 Cap'n VG   Members   -  Reputation: 190

Posted 14 July 2013 - 06:07 AM

using unity3d engine, 

 

As you know, for indie game developers, game design is everything, especially game design that can be sold!

It is problem of life or death, key point of divider whether wasting 6months~years of himself or few developers and thousand of money or successfully withdraw money big more than investment and time invested. 

I think All is up to [Game Design(Game planning)], isn't it? So what game should be maked? and can be maked? within few months?

So for solo developer or few guys team, what is good strategy? Who can do this job good? Who can teach this? 

Or how can learn this properly?

 

Or should I approach at business level, and get investors or funds, hiring game designer first? Yes this is maybe more good way, but, you know,  getting funds is hardest way.

 

Any opinions? Thanks. 

 

My opinion is that first do what you like doing. Whether it is programming, drawing etc just do it. Any skill that you're strong at will certainly help being a game designer as you are experienced in your job. Then when you get promoted, you'll soon end up making a game of your wish. 

 

Some books on game design are also a good start that is if you have time to read big books. However even with books and the skills that you currently have still might not be enough. Try making a portfolio, develop your communication skills and most important enjoy doing what you do.



#5 hardcoreDEV   Members   -  Reputation: 120

Posted 14 July 2013 - 07:30 AM

thx for reply, 

 

I am already and mainly unity3d programmer. 

 

But I feel game design is more keypoint and also require many research and time, experience. Problem is, I can't do both job well. of course I can do both, but if I concentrate one field, all other talents become dim. Lack of resources, time doesn't allow each field's proffessional polishing which result poor game finishing. 

 

I need coop with investor, or/and game designer. 


www.perfectionofwisdom.com 

 


#6 Norman Barrows   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2332

Posted 14 July 2013 - 09:01 AM

 
 
i've been an at least semi-successful indie game developer off and on for 35 years now.
 

using unity3d engine, 
 
the project should define the tools used, not the other way around.   FIRST you decide what to build, THEN you decide which tools within your budget will get the job done most efficiently. So right off the bat, throw away that assumption that you'll want to use Unity. Once you figure out what to build, then yes, maybe unity will be the tool of choice. But you won't know until you've decided what to build.
 

As you know, for indie game developers, game design is everything, especially game design that can be sold!
 
the aspects of indie game design that are important are exactly the same as those that are important for a big studio making the same type of game. the number of employees has no effect on what's important for a good game. whatever makes a good game in general is whats important, to both indie and big studio alike.
 

It is problem of life or death, key point of divider whether wasting 6months~years of himself or few developers and thousand of money or successfully withdraw money big more than investment and time invested. 
 
this is true of any game project.  but design is just one aspect. a game needs good: market appeal, design, code, graphics, audio, game play mechanics, MARKETING, PR, etc.   marketing and sales is almost as much work as building the darn thing in the first place!
 
 

I think All is up to [Game Design(Game planning)], isn't it? So what game should be maked? and can be maked? within few months?
 
what to build will define how much competition there is. as a general rule of thumb, for any game you choose, odds are there are 3 other indies / teams / studios somewhere working on a similar product. but many of those never get finished and released.
 
there are 2 basic strategies:
1. compete in a genre where you have little / no competition. this is usually easier. since there's no competition, you set the standard for minimum quality level necessary.
2. become the superior product in a genre that has competition. the competition's products already set the standard for minimum quality, and you must exceed that.
 
as to the specific type of game, first and foremost, it must be a gametype you're into. if its not, to you its "just another app" instead of a "cool game", and you should probably get into something like database or web development instead, as there's probably more money in it. Working on a gametype you like also helps keep you motivated to work for months/years with no pay.
 
i myself tend to build what i'd like to play that hasn't been made yet, or hasn't been done recently. IE has potential appeal and low/no competition.
 
once you have a game type in mind, then you do research online to determine popularity. usually, you'll have a few game types in mind. each should be evaluated for expected sales vs how much work it is to make. You want to go with the title with the best expected sales for a given amount of work (perhaps measured in months of development time).
 
"within a few months" may be a major design constraint. especially if you have to add in time for learning new skills. within a few months, an experienced dev might be able to do something like "angry birds" or perhaps one level of a AAA quality FPS game.
 
also, the time required to get a game to release state is more than just the time required to build it. You have to do things like installers, docs, etc. and then you have to market it. Actually, you should be marketing it from day one. Setting up websites with screenshots and blogs, etc, building "buzz" about the product. Just remember you're building a game, not a website.    
 
you might build a simple game in about 3 months, take another month getting it to release state, then spend 3 months marketing after you release before the dollars start rolling in.
 

 


Or should I approach at business level, and get investors or funds, hiring game designer first? Yes this is maybe more good way, but, you know,  getting funds is hardest way.
 
believe it or not, almost no game project has a dedicated "game designer".  usually the designers are also the coders. sometimes they're the artists, and get a coder to work with them. the only famous title i can think of with a dedicated designer was Di-Katana. There, Romero (of ID fame) left ID, and setup his own studio. he designed the game, and others built it. As is usual in the case of game projects lead by a dedicated designer, it was the designer himself paying for everything upfront. As i recall, Romero blew something like 45-65 million dollars on dikatana. or maybe it was 4.5 to 6.5 mil.
 
getting funding will be difficult with no proven track record. it also tends to tie your hands creatively. you are no longer an independent entrepreneur and inventor, you are now just a "developer for hire" producing a specific hunk of code, graphics, and audio files that you've been contracted to create. and worse, if you fail, you're in debt to your investors as well (depending on the nature of the funding).     On the other hand, you may have an idea for a cool new type of game (like tetris was when it first came out), and it may be popular enough to fund via kickstarter etc.
 
here's what i would do:
1. what do i like to play, and its not out there yet?
2. how long would it take to build?
3. might it be popular enough to be worth the time?
 
if seems popular enough to be worth it, do a simple version, release it, and see what happens.
 
if you can't think of a gametype with no competition, you expand the search:
 
1. what do i like to play, that's already out there, but they all suck, and "i could write something better than THIS!".
 
this is actually how i accidentally got into game development.
 
one night back in 1988, me and a buddy decided to download and check out Star Trek games. We downloaded 14 different games. All the same old top down sector quadrant thing that i was playing on the mainframe in high school back in 1979. EGA Trek was the best, as it featured 16 color text mode display ( ooh and ah! <g> ). that's when i said, "Man, i can write something better than THIS!". in six weeks i had. showed it to my friends. they said "looks cool! needs more explosions!" so i added more and better explosions. then i contacted the sysop of the biggest BBS at OSU about how to package it for downloading and sale. this was right about the time of wolf-3d. he recommended an approach similar to ID, some for free, and pay for the rest if you like it. so i made my zip file with docs, order form, etc, and posed it on the local BBSs. Someone downloaded it and re-uploaded it to AOL. it then became a top ten download on AOL (10,000+ copies downloaded the first week), checks started pouring in , in the mail, and just like that <snap>, i was making 60K a year as an indie game dev. 
 
 
i only see 3 potential errors in you line of thought:
 
1. choosing unity before you've even chosen game type. forget about tools until you have a gametype. then let the tools fit the game.
 
2. a few months development time. probably not happening for anything that would make any kind of decent money. perhaps a remake of an old classic for a new platform, the way angry birds is "artillary for the iphone". almost any game that would fit this description would by definition have to be a casual game for casual gamers. mobile devices aren't really up to doing hard core games (take a look at age of empires or the sims on the nintendo 3ds). also, a hard core game just isn't happening in a few months. they're simply too big to build that fast.
 
3. hiring a designer and getting funding.
 
you should design it. if not, you should instead join an exiting team as a coder etc, if your not into design, just implementation. to be a really good gamedev, you should be a gamer first, a coder second, an artist 3rd, and a soundguy 4th. code, art, and audio are means to an end, its the game that matters. and gamers tend to make the best game designers, 'casue they don't get as distracted by stuff like cool graphics engine code, killer canned animations made in 3dsMAX, or getting the "WHOP WHOP WHOP" of chopper blades correct in a 3d audio environment when the chopper flys behind the player.
 
getting funding will require a good game idea. good enough for other people to bet their money on. and they bet not only on the idea, but your ability to deliver on time, on target, and on budget. from an investments point of view, you're a new company with no track record, and no killer product waiting in the wings. one would probably be better off buying EA stock.
 
figure out what you'd like to make most.
then evaluate it for potential sales vs development time. if it looks good, go for it.
if not, figure out your #2 choice and evaluate it.
repeat until you have a choice that seems worth pursuing. then pursue it with vigor, passion, and obsession.
 
once you decide on a game type, then choose the tools that will get the job done most efficiently, taking into account learning curve time based on your current skill set.
 
then rapid prototype your design to confirm that it works, is potentially cool, and therefore worth pursuing further.  The first time i accidentally blew up my own hanger in Airships! with a  20Kg bomb, i knew i had a winner on my hands. OTOH, i have't touched Armies of Steel II (alpha version) in months, as it seems to be lacking something in the game play of the prototype (fog of war most likely). also, it has hard coded missions and balancing the Orders of Battle to be not too hard or easy is a very fine line. or perhaps the real time war game has evolved into the first person tank shooter, etc, and the older game type no longer has the same basic appeal, as user's tastes become more sophisticated.
 
once you get a rapid prototype that passes muster, then sit down and figure out exactly what will go into the game. this gives you the start of your todo list. every feature to be added, every bug to be fixed, every section of code to be tested, put it on the todo list. kill bugs first. your code should compile and run with no warnings, errors, or crashes in release mode build at all times.
 
remember, all programs start with something like:
 
void main() 
{
}
 
any bugs in the program are ones you put into the code between the open and close squiggly brackets. that's a paraphrase from a lecture at CGDC'97 about writing bulletproof code.
 
keep working away at it. once you get to stable alpha stage, get some testers. only keep the ones that give good feedback. one can usually find a few fans of any given game type willing to beta test for a free copy of the final version. they tend to make good testers, as they fit the  demographics of your "target user".
 
Once you get it whipped into shape, release. 
 
marketing is a whole 'nother ball of wax.
 
development and marketing should really occur in parallel. with a web site for the product, and all the usual game website stuff: chat boards, screen shots, blogs, etc.
 
and nothing beats free PR. SIMtrek getting posted on AOL was free PR. i didn't even have an AOL account back then. Ironically, withing a few years, AOL gave me my own free forum on AOL.  
 
I think the key to SIMTrek was two fold: first, it was a vastly superior product: a true 3D starship flight simulator - the first of its kind. mouse driven graphical user interface back when the OS was still DOS, and it TALKED! like a Cylon voice: "by your command" through the PC speaker. this was before sound cards.  Second was the file description i wrote. you only get something like 100 characters to convince the user to DL your demo. i probably spent a week on those 3 or 4 sentences. The description got their attention, the quality got their dollars.
 
back in 2000, my CAVEMAN game made the local evening news here in washington dc as a last minute xmas gift idea. more free PR. it only took 24 hours to exceed my website bandwidth (about 2000 downloads). and my webhosting  reseller was closed for xmas! took 3 days to get the site back up.  but free PR is not something you can really make happen on your own. the key there is to "build a better mousetrap".
 
"build a better mousetrap, [TELL THE WORLD ABOUT IT], and the world will beat a path to your door."
 
note that if you make a game type with no real competition, by being the "only mousetrap", you are by definition also the "better mousetrap".

Edited by Norman Barrows, 14 July 2013 - 09:33 AM.

Norm Barrows

Rockland Software Productions

"Building PC games since 1989"

rocklandsoftware.net

 

PLAY CAVEMAN NOW!

http://rocklandsoftware.net/beta.php

 

 


#7 mippy   Members   -  Reputation: 1004

Posted 14 July 2013 - 09:22 AM

  1. Just do it.
  2. Start super-small (super-small = console game, icons, sprite 3d scroller. 
  3. Don't be perfectionist
  4. Deliver/publish to practice selling. (No matter how good you are you will never make money unless you have a habit to sell your produce) 
  5. One released pong-game trumps a non-released 3d-shooter-game. 


#8 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 31920

Posted 14 July 2013 - 09:42 AM


believe it or not, almost no game project has a dedicated "game designer".  usually the designers are also the coders. sometimes they're the artists, and get a coder to work with them. the only famous title i can think of with a dedicated designer was Di-Katana. There, Romero (of ID fame) left ID, and setup his own studio. he designed the game, and others built it. As is usual in the case of game projects lead by a dedicated designer, it was the designer himself paying for everything upfront. As i recall, Romero blew something like 45-65 million dollars on dikatana. or maybe it was 4.5 to 6.5 mil.
Every game that I've worked on at a studio has had at least one game designer, often several (e.g. a 'lead', one focussed on character control/abilities, one focussed on enemy encounters and combat, one focussed on level layouts and puzzles, etc). The lead designer answers to the producer (just like the lead programmer does), who answers to the guys that are fronting the money: the publisher. These projects were just typical console games with small budgets of $1-10Mil. "AAA" type console games are the same but with budgets of $10-100Mil...

 

Yeah with a smaller team (i.e. not a dozen to a hundred people), it's often not practical to have dedicated designers on the team, as you need every person to be outputting as much work as possible. Having a programming designer means you can get away with having one less programmer on the team ;)

 

Daikatana is a famous failure due to mismanagement, probably because a game designer was also acting as a manager, which when combined with an inexperienced team led to inaccurate time estimates, the use of outdated technology and mid-project tech changes, and severe budget blowouts. The main reason it's remembered as a flop though (apparently it broke even financially) is simply because John Romero hyped it up as being the best shooter ever, yet it was very mediocre.

 


I think All is up to [Game Design(Game planning)], isn't it? So what game should be maked? and can be maked? within few months?
What can be made in a few months depends entirely on the team!

One team may be able to make a particular game in one month, whereas a different team might take 5 years...

 

Also, designing and planning are two different skills. Usually in big teams at big companies, there will be project managers, producers and 'leads' from each department (lead programmer, lead artist, lead designer, etc) who will all work together on the planning part of a project.

So for solo developer or few guys team, what is good strategy? Who can do this job good? Who can teach this? 
Or how can learn this properly?
The only way to learn is through experience. You (and your team) need to make games. Only once you're actually practising your skills can you start to make estimates on how quickly you can complete things.

Or should I approach at business level, and get investors or funds, hiring game designer first? Yes this is maybe more good way, but, you know,  getting funds is hardest way.
Any opinions?
If you don't have an established and experienced team, don't go looking for funding.

Get some practice making free/hobby games first until you're able to answer these questions yourself, such as "how long will it take us to make [[game feature]]".



#9 hardcoreDEV   Members   -  Reputation: 120

Posted 14 July 2013 - 10:14 AM

Thanks for replies, specially long reply by Norman and Hodgman!

 

All your opinions are precious. 

 

Already I made some game by solo and few members. Recent thing is www.perfectionofwisdom.com card game. 

 

But I stuck at marketing(and maybe the game is too serious), and I don't have budget enough now. 

 

So I started making simple simulation game targeted on Android mobile 2 months ago, completed 70% now.  

 

Using unity3d engine is, I have been used it for 3~4 years, pretty acquainted, and currently need earn money fastly, so don't have time to learn another tool.


Edited by hardcoreDEV, 14 July 2013 - 10:15 AM.

www.perfectionofwisdom.com 

 


#10 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10163

Posted 14 July 2013 - 11:30 AM


1. How to learn game planning, game design?
2. I think All is up to [Game Design(Game planning)], isn't it?

3. So what game should be maked? and can be maked? within few months?
4. So for solo developer or few guys team, what is good strategy?

5. Who can do this job good?

6. Who can teach this?  Or how can learn this properly?
7. Or should I approach at business level, and get investors or funds, hiring game designer first? Yes this is maybe more good way, but, you know, getting funds is hardest way.

 

Hi hardcoredev,

Wow, this question is all over the place!  You posted it in Game Design, but this is much more than a game design question.  Actually, you are not asking a game design question at all.  So I'm going to move this, but I have to think about where it belongs (since you're asking so many different things).

1. Since you are asking not only about game design but also about business and production: you can learn by doing, and you can learn by reading, going to school, and doing. 

2. Not really, no.  A good game idea isn't enough.  It's also important to have a good business idea.  Making a game is the easy part; then it has to be published and monetized. 

3.a. What should be made is completely up to you.  You can do a market analysis and decide on that basis, or you can make a passion project.  If you can be passionate about a game concept chosen by market analysis, even better!

3.b. What you can make is known only to you and, if applicable, your partners.

3.c. A small game can be made within a few months -- a small web game or a small mobile game.  See the Production and Management forum.

4. The best strategy is to consider the market, know the team's strengths and weaknesses, and make not only a good game but also a good game plan (business idea). 

5. Is this one of those "if you have to ask" questions? :)

6. There are schools, but practice and experience are the best teachers.  A combination of both is even better.  See the Game Industry Job Advice forum for information about education.

7. Chicken and egg.  How can you get investors to fork over funds if you don't have a team or a game or a business idea?  How can you put a team together if you don't have funds?  See the Business and Law forum.

 

I think I'll have to move this to The Lounge, since it doesn't fit neatly into any one forum.  Going forward, it would be best to ask narrowly focused questions in the forum whose focus matches the question.  You get the best answers that way (from folks who concentrate on those forums).

Good luck, hardcoredev!


-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#11 Norman Barrows   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2332

Posted 15 July 2013 - 10:01 AM


Every game that I've worked on at a studio has had at least one game designer, often several (e.g. a 'lead', one focussed on character control/abilities, one focussed on enemy encounters and combat, one focussed on level layouts and puzzles, etc). The lead designer answers to the producer (just like the lead programmer does), who answers to the guys that are fronting the money: the publisher. These projects were just typical console games with small budgets of $1-10Mil. "AAA" type console games are the same but with budgets of $10-100Mil...

 

were they full time "spec guys" ? they didn't do anything else, like code or art or biz or marketing stuff?

 

i suppose in a tight enough schedule, with a big enough army of coders, artists, etc, and established code base/libraries, and the money being available, management could define a target product, the designers would flesh it out, and the "army" would build stuff almost as fast as the designers could specify it, so the designers would never sit idle towards the end.

 

or is it done out of phase? once the spec is done, the designers start on the next project's specs, and just go into caretaker mode on the current project?


Norm Barrows

Rockland Software Productions

"Building PC games since 1989"

rocklandsoftware.net

 

PLAY CAVEMAN NOW!

http://rocklandsoftware.net/beta.php

 

 


#12 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 31920

Posted 15 July 2013 - 10:17 AM

were they full time "spec guys" ? they didn't do anything else, like code or art or biz or marketing stuff?

Yeah, their job is "game designer", or "level designer". They don't do art or code. The closest they might come is some grey-box art to demonstrate how they'd like something laid out, or tweaking some variables in a script file that a programmer has given to them, or plugging in triggers/events/objects in a level-editor / visual-scripting tool.
 
They're still a very rare position though, with probably a dozen (or two) other staff for every one of them.
 
 

or is it done out of phase? once the spec is done, the designers start on the next project's specs, and just go into caretaker mode on the current project?

They definitely have a disproportionate amount of work at the beginning of a project. There will hardly be any staff on a project initially - no big team of artists or coders yet. The bulk of artists and programmers can't join the project until they have concepts, designs and a schedule/plan to follow.
During the project, the designers are still kept busy though. No plan survives initial contact with the enemy, and with game designs that often means that when you first get to play it, it's not as fun as it should be.
 
A lot of details will be impossible to specify in complete detail -- e.g. the designer can't really say up-front that a storm-trooper's "raise weapon to aim" animation should take exactly 0.54 seconds. This detail though does have a knock-on effect on the gameplay, so when reviewing the progress of the game, the designers, animation programmers, and animators might all iterate on this minute detail to tune in the fun.
As character abilities, enemies, AI, etc all come together, the design might need to be changed to account for features that didn't work out, or things that were accidentally invented/discovered along the way and turn out to be fun.
The guys with the money might also butt-in with feedback during development, making demands that the designers then have to massage into their design.
Towards the end of a project, the designer might even be involved in the final bug-fixing stages, prioritising which bugs are "must fix before shipping" and which ones go into the "we can pretend that's a feature" pile ;)
Often designers also take on the role of a producer/project-manager somewhat: assisting in scheduling of milestones, which features should be worked on each week, liaising between departments or otherwise making sure that communication is happening, etc... and if they really have nothing to do, they can help QA find problems in the current build ;)
 
But yes, the staffing needs of a project typically start small, explode in the middle, and then go back to being fairly small at the end. Big studios with a lot of full-time staff need to find ways to keep everyone busy (and employed), so having two or more overlapping projects can be a good idea (assuming the biz guys can drum up enough business, or keep enough cash in reserve to independently fund the studio).

Edited by Hodgman, 15 July 2013 - 10:22 AM.


#13 Norman Barrows   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2332

Posted 18 July 2013 - 07:36 AM


Yeah, their job is "game designer", or "level designer".

 

oh, ok. i consider those two different things. i consider level designers to be more like 3d artists, although they are actually more like the director of a movie or a stage play. game designers in my mind are the ones who define the weapon types, the combat rules, in general the rules of the game and the environment in which its played. by my definition, a lot of "design" work is delegated. a dedicated designer (like Romero) may specify 4 environments and X number of bad guy types, and specific types of bosses, but delegate the details of things like the exact look of a given boss or the exact layout of a given level to 3d artists or level designers who flesh out the design. So both the "dedicated designer" and "3d artist" or "level designer" are the designers in that case. I guess the distinction that i draw is that a pure designer draws up specs, but does not produce content or perform other biz/marketing duties. So in my book, a level designer is both a designer (determines the details of how a level is laid out and plays), and a content creator (actually creating the level in an editor), and thus not a "specs only" guy.


Norm Barrows

Rockland Software Productions

"Building PC games since 1989"

rocklandsoftware.net

 

PLAY CAVEMAN NOW!

http://rocklandsoftware.net/beta.php

 

 


#14 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 31920

Posted 18 July 2013 - 08:05 AM

So in my book, a level designer is both a designer (determines the details of how a level is laid out and plays), and a content creator (actually creating the level in an editor), and thus not a "specs only" guy.

The level designers that I mentioned don't actually create the level content, besides crudely drawn layouts on napkins wink.png
A concept artist paints a picture of what different parts of the level should look like, a designer decides on the flow for gameplay's sake (this enemy introduced here, a big firefight with cover happens here, a platform timed-jumping puzzle happens there, etc), and then environment artists do the 3D/texture work that's required based on the concept and design.


by my definition, a lot of "design" work is delegated. a dedicated designer (like Romero) may specify 4 environments and X number of bad guy types, and specific types of bosses, but delegate the details of things like the exact look of a given boss or the exact layout of a given level to 3d artists or level designers who flesh out the design.
Yeah that's what I was getting at with the design team. He'd be the lead designer, and there might be a combat designer (who tweaks damage amounts, etc) and a level designer (who tweaks layouts, etc) underneath him, etc...

 

In my experience, stuff like the look of a character usually wouldn't be touched by the design team because it doesn't impact game-play. There'd be an art director, who's delegating to concept artists to come up with initial "look" designs, and then delegating to the 3D artists to implement them.

The exception is if there's a "creative director" on the team -- this guy wants to be a dictator over everything, from looks, to gameplay, to story, to sound... He'd basically be the lead designer, lead writer and art director in one... possibly also the executive producer, and CEO...


Edited by Hodgman, 18 July 2013 - 08:13 AM.


#15 Norman Barrows   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2332

Posted 26 July 2013 - 11:14 PM


The level designers that I mentioned don't actually create the level content, besides crudely drawn layouts on napkins 
A concept artist paints a picture of what different parts of the level should look like, a designer decides on the flow for gameplay's sake (this enemy introduced here, a big firefight with cover happens here, a platform timed-jumping puzzle happens there, etc), and then environment artists do the 3D/texture work that's required based on the concept and design.

 

those would be true "spec guys" then!

 

fascinating.

 

i suppose those positions are usually held by true gamer types, eh?

so they design the play layout, then hand it off to others to punch it up in the level editor...

that would be a big team there.

 

ah, to command such a crew! think of the games one could build! <g>.


Norm Barrows

Rockland Software Productions

"Building PC games since 1989"

rocklandsoftware.net

 

PLAY CAVEMAN NOW!

http://rocklandsoftware.net/beta.php

 

 





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