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FloatBuffer.put(float vertices[]) vs FloatBuffer.put(float[] src, int offset, int length)


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#1 PaulJabs   Members   -  Reputation: 130

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:29 AM

Hello programmers,

I am sure that i am in the correct section because this is opengl with regards to android game development.
I study a book which is a pdf and i found early chapters using FloatBuffer.put(float vertices[]) and i understand that. But for the next chapters they use FloatBuffer.put(float[] src, int offset, int length). I am hoping someone can answer what is the difference between the two. What is the meaning and what is the importance of offset and length in FloatBuffer.put(float[] src, int offset, int length). Thanks a lot.



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#2 Dave Hunt   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2335

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:41 AM

FloatBuffer.put(float[] vertices) adds all elements of the vertices array to the buffer.

 

FloatBuffer.put(float[] src,int offset, int length) adds "length" elements of the src array starting at the "offset" element of the src array to the buffer. e.g. starting at src[offset] and continuing for "length" elements.

 

Actually, this isn't really an OpenGL question. FloatBuffer is part of Java and is not specific to OpenGL at all.



#3 PaulJabs   Members   -  Reputation: 130

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 01:17 PM

FloatBuffer.put(float[] vertices) adds all elements of the vertices array to the buffer.

 

FloatBuffer.put(float[] src,int offset, int length) adds "length" elements of the src array starting at the "offset" element of the src array to the buffer. e.g. starting at src[offset] and continuing for "length" elements.

 

Actually, this isn't really an OpenGL question. FloatBuffer is part of Java and is not specific to OpenGL at all.

A thanks. i get it.  If you have:

float v[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
FloatBuffer.put[v,2,2];

It adds 3 and 4.

Yes, this is not opengl.


Edited by PaulJabs, 16 July 2013 - 01:19 PM.


#4 Dave Hunt   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2335

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 01:38 PM


A thanks. i get it.  If you have:

float v[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
FloatBuffer.put[v,2,2];

It adds 3 and 4.

You got it!






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