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Opinion on My Artwork?


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#1 dvds414   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 02:11 PM

Render01.png175e473e-ff58-4f2a-b7a5-21a7Render02.png547a7b42-fc61-4897-b2ac-4778Render03.png414e1638-0c31-42ef-a014-3403Render05.png4410e696-25f2-47ce-bbbc-7d8f

 

Here is a recent model I made for my game. I also want to sell this model online. Can I get some opinions please?



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#2 Scouting Ninja   Members   -  Reputation: 783

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 05:31 PM

I will be critical.

Mesh:

The final low poly mesh shouldn't have any bevel on it, the bevel data and other high poly details should be backed into the normal map.

Subdivide the mesh and slightly pull the vertices around, the unevenness will add some realness even a object cut by a machine will cause jagged ends.

 

Texture:

First nice diffuse texture.

Use a normal map and specular map even for unreflective materials, it will keep you in the proper workflow.

 

I know modern game engines can easily display large amount of polygons, yet if you bake the bevel edges into the texture you could use twice the amount of planks and still get the same results.



#3 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3167

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:27 PM

Hi,

 

Scouting Ninja was right with the advice and nothing more needs to be said about the model itself.

 

Looking at the broad picture of things, look into what is in demand in the game development industry.  Basic building materials such as this are common.  If you want to join the same segment of the market, the you must release huge numbers of these small models and the models should be distinguished from the competition in some way (quality, value, or price) in order to make significant money.

 

If you want to earn more money than is possible with small, low poly models, then you need to diversify your types of art. 

 

Basic business strategy is to do market research into exactly what is in demand and meet it or you may create demand by making things that are new and innovative.

 

Ultimately you would earn the most money in 3D modeling (potentially) by creating your own games which use the models that you make.   Second most earning power is by creating complex models such as vehicles or fully equipped characters. for example.  Small models can earn money with huge volume of them and business savvy such as having your own website and drawing traffic there.     

 

Have fun!

 

Clinton


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#4 ShadowFlar3   Members   -  Reputation: 1258

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 11:55 PM

Well, its a short length of wood board. There are 18 faces and as Scouting Ninja said, you shouldn't model those bevels for game use. Mobile games take a standard 6-faced stretched cube ( = cuboid) as well as PC games but PC could use a normal map as well if the board is viewed close up.

 

It's not very elaborate and definitely not something people would buy as they could just use a cuboid with a simple texture for similar result even if they didn't know first thing about 3D modeling.

 

It's good practice for texturing and modeling but I'm afraid you're going to work harder if you want to make some money on the competitive 3D model market. That being said, it's still a viable 3D model that you created so keep on modeling and move on to more challenging shapes smile.png


Edited by ShadowFlar3, 26 August 2013 - 11:56 PM.


#5 Kryzon   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 3314

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 03:54 PM

I second the advice given by the others, and I add that I like the fact you used a different texture for the front and back, representing the core of the tree, instead of just using the same "wood" texture for all sides. It's a step towards realism and makes it look like that plank was really cut from a real tree.

That attention to detail is important.


Edited by Kryzon, 27 August 2013 - 03:55 PM.


#6 dvds414   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 11:11 AM

Thank you all so much for the advice! It is very helpful



#7 rouncer   Members   -  Reputation: 291

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 08:24 AM

this should be a part of a kit if you were planning on selling it, like for making wargrounds or something.



#8 Dawoodoz   Members   -  Reputation: 331

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 01:32 AM

I usually apply a high pass filter when I need different photos to match each other. When baking, try to apply the end texture to the whole plank with a little angle to remove seams from the edges, then bake another texture with the other photo and mix the 2 results by hand in a photo editor to get the final diffuse texture. If you can get a photo of wood without shine then make bump, specular and gloss maps where the green channel of the diffuse map generate high bump on bright and high gloss on dark. Then you can bake the bump map into a normal map to add more details on the edges.


Edited by Dawoodoz, 05 September 2013 - 01:33 AM.

My open source DirectX 10/11 graphics engine. https://sites.google.com/site/dawoodoz

"My design pattern is the simplest to understand. Everyone else is just too stupid to understand it."


#9 Scouting Ninja   Members   -  Reputation: 783

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:30 AM


I usually apply a high pass filter when I need different photos to match each other. When baking, try to apply the end texture to the whole plank with a little angle to remove seams from the edges, then bake another texture with the other photo and mix the 2 results by hand in a photo editor to get the final diffuse texture. If you can get a photo of wood without shine then make bump, specular and gloss maps where the green channel of the diffuse map generate high bump on bright and high gloss on dark. Then you can bake the bump map into a normal map to add more details on the edges.

 

Because this is a lot different from the way I would normally make a wood texture I attempted it, to see what it would look like.

I think I misinterpret because the end result looked more like metal than wood, could you post a image showing what the end results should look like?



#10 silkroadgame   Members   -  Reputation: 211

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:22 PM

The biggest problem in your render is the textures which are not good enough.

More real tree like would be better I think.


http://www.game-silkroad.com
info_game@silkroadcg.com





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