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Colored Stochastic Shadowmaps?


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#1 ill   Members   -  Reputation: 320

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 01:31 AM

I stumbled upon this paper: http://graphics.cs.williams.edu/papers/CSSM/

 

Here's the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdEo3G08IwM

 

It looks pretty amazing.

 

Has anyone else tried something like this?  I'm thinking of trying it out in my engine, but if anyone knows that it creates some pretty bad looking artifacts I would probably avoid it.



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#2 Chris_F   Members   -  Reputation: 2354

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 07:46 PM

I don't think it looks that good to be honest because it is not close enough to how real caustics behave. I would probably prefer ordinary shadow maps instead.

 

Edit: I'm referring to the video. Some of the examples in the paper look a bit more convincing.


Edited by Chris_F, 29 August 2013 - 07:50 PM.


#3 ill   Members   -  Reputation: 320

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 11:02 PM

I just noticed at about :15 seconds in the shadows inside the little tube things didn't look too good.  I think the purple shadows from the purple pipes and blueish shadow from the fence look really nice, although I'm really confused how that red shadow in the beginning is cast by that purple tank.


Edited by ill, 29 August 2013 - 11:05 PM.


#4 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30345

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 09:03 PM

I remember seeing this a few years ago and dismissing it as being too expensive (2-4x memory use, and larger filters required)... but my current project has a lot of layers of translucency, and GPUs can now deal with the bandwidth requirements for this... so I might give it a go and see how it looks cool.png

 


I don't think it looks that good to be honest because it is not close enough to how real caustics behave.
It doesn't model caustics at all, so anything that looks like caustics is just an artefact of the filtering ohmy.png

Ordinary shadow maps are an apples-and-oranges comparison, because they don't support translucency at all.



#5 Chris_F   Members   -  Reputation: 2354

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 09:26 PM

I remember seeing this a few years ago and dismissing it as being too expensive (2-4x memory use, and larger filters required)... but my current project has a lot of layers of translucency, and GPUs can now deal with the bandwidth requirements for this... so I might give it a go and see how it looks cool.png

 

 

 


I don't think it looks that good to be honest because it is not close enough to how real caustics behave.
It doesn't model caustics at all, so anything that looks like caustics is just an artefact of the filtering ohmy.png

Ordinary shadow maps are an apples-and-oranges comparison, because they don't support translucency at all.

 

Well, it is caustics (light passing through a transparent substance) without taking refraction into account. For paper thin objects it would be a close approximation, but for those giant colored tubes it fails completely and is IMO more distracting than an ordinary shadow.



#6 InvalidPointer   Members   -  Reputation: 1432

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:21 AM

As of right now I think AVSMs are the more interesting choice.


clb: At the end of 2012, the positions of jupiter, saturn, mercury, and deimos are aligned so as to cause a denormalized flush-to-zero bug when computing earth's gravitational force, slinging it to the sun.




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