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I need a C++ Mentor.


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#1 Tneeds   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 07:37 PM

Alright guys so I'm learning c++, I bought 2 books but I dont learn really well (retain) information that way, I was kind of wanting a mentor to teach me the rest of the c++ basics so I can start getting into programming, I can right a Hello World program and some basic calculators, anyways if anybody wants to help me out reply to me, thanks!



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#2 Tneeds   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 07:38 PM

Start getting into Game Programming, I Want to learn the  basics of c++ first.



#3 Tneeds   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 07:41 PM

Start getting into Game Programming, I Want to learn the  basics of c++ first.

Or somebody to teach me the language more, before i get into the game dev side of things.



#4 CDProp   Members   -  Reputation: 918

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 07:56 PM

Whoa, C++ is a huge topic. I guess Hello, World is a good place to start. First thing's first, you need to get into a position where you can create, compile, link, and run C++ programs. Have you gotten that far yet? Also, do you have any prior programming experience with any other languages?



#5 PandaDragonThing   Members   -  Reputation: 311

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:05 PM

There is much you can learn from tutorials and examples, a google search away.

This entire community has the purpose of being your mentor. Advising and training you in the basics of C++ and many detailed topics of programming.... just ask questions and ask for help whenever you need it.



#6 valdsign   Members   -  Reputation: 193

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:19 PM

have you bought "C++, How To Program" by Paul Deitel ?, the book is readable for beginner.



#7 Tneeds   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 09:50 PM

No, I have sams teach yourself and c++ For dummies, I just know basic variables, and No i have no prior experience, Im a senior in highschool and just want to learn c++ before I go to college in a yr. I know people will say watch a youtube video or something, but idk, i need a full tutorial set thats slow paced.



#8 Tneeds   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 09:52 PM

Whoa, C++ is a huge topic. I guess Hello, World is a good place to start. First thing's first, you need to get into a position where you can create, compile, link, and run C++ programs. Have you gotten that far yet? Also, do you have any prior programming experience with any other languages?

I use a IDE, I dont do all that, I use Xcode. And no, no prior experience.



#9 Xai   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1340

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 09:57 PM

I recommend 1 thing in addition to a mentor ... a cohort.  If I had time I'd mentor you, but I just had a daughter and I just can't spare enough time to pull you up as much as you'll need to invest.  However, in addition to trying to find someone to help you understand the occasional concept from a book or tutorial that's just flying over your head ... find someone who wants to learn as well.  Someone you can have long conversations with trying to figure stuff out, debates, or just someone you can work with trying to make the damn code do what it "should".  Working with someone is so rewarding for both parties, even if 1 of you ends up being way better than the other (which almost always happens, but ... so what).

 

Good Luck.



#10 Xai   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1340

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:03 PM

The is NOT a good "by itself" tutorial, but it is helpful when you want to "look up" something you may not have gotten figured out correctly:  http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

Not sure if this one is good or not either, but:  http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c++-tutorial.html  Personally I find this 3rd one a bit slow, but if you have no human help it might be good, and also, its good to skim the titles and see if there are any you may have missed:  http://www.learncpp.com/.



#11 valdsign   Members   -  Reputation: 193

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:41 PM

No, I have sams teach yourself and c++ For dummies, I just know basic variables, and No i have no prior experience, Im a senior in highschool and just want to learn c++ before I go to college in a yr. I know people will say watch a youtube video or something, but idk, i need a full tutorial set thats slow paced.

well, so do I, I'm an informatics engineering collage student for last one year, I have absolutly no experience in programming when I was first time start to took the collage, (and still I am, with very basic knowledge :P), we can share any question or information , sorry for my bad english, I hope you are able to understand what I'm trying to tell you about :)



#12 David Ga11agher   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 11:15 PM

There is great C++ youtube channel called Absolute n00b spoonfeed that is very informative and might help you acclimate to the environment.



#13 Noxil   Members   -  Reputation: 560

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 02:19 AM

Learning C++ can be quite hard in the beginning.

I my self had some problem even when following a book.

 

But one thing that helped  me was that if i read something in the book, for example "how to use functions".

Id try and remake what i have done before, but with the new information if possible.

 

Lets take the hello world as an example.

Regular way:

void main()
{
     std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
}

Functions way:

void HelloWorld()
{
     std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
}
 
void main()
{
     HelloWorld();
}

Then when i got that working, i experimented before moving on.

For example, what happens if i write another row after HelloWorld(); with another HelloWorld();

For me, it was by trying out things like this, that was the "Aha" moment for me smile.png

 

Later on in the book you will come across more complicated examples.

But dont worry if you dont get it the first time. Just write down the examples, try to run them.

Try to experiment and try to do your own tweaks and adjustments.

 

What i want to convey is that, for me, the best way of learning something new is to experiment.

Get your hands dirty so to say :)



#14 mike656   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 08:24 PM

I'd like to venture into the C++ world myself, but currently I just don't have the time to squeeze it into my already busy plate. I already have about 3 dozen books on the subject and tons of source and tutorial material. Its definitely in my to-do list. 

 

Learning will take more than a year though. C++ is huge and you really should get a head start by learning a simpler language so that you begin to wire your brain in such a way to make picking up C++ easier. I've already got that head start, being adept at a couple of different languages and technologies (been programming for over a decade now). However, feel free to hit me up (via email) and we can chit chat later in the fall. I will probably have more time to devote to start my own learning process for c++ in the winter or spring. I'm the opposite of you though; I can learn with books and reading, and prefer being able to go at my own pace, as opposed to the often slow pace of a classroom or group learning. 

 

Anyway, just wanted to chime in on this since it's something I'd like to do soon too. I'm not ready yet, but preparing and in a few months I'd be willing to get with you and learn WITH YOU. It really does help to know other languages though, especially if you already know OOP. I agree with Noxil... just jump in and get your hands dirty and keep them dirty. Throw yourself to the lions. It's always worked out best for me that way. Maybe you too.



#15 Slowvomit   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:16 PM

Mentoring someone in C++ is a full time job. You should go to school and find a teacher, if you're adamant on getting a mentor :)



#16 DekuTree64   Members   -  Reputation: 972

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 11:06 AM

What style of games do you like, and what sort of complexity level? NES, SNES, N64, XBox 360? And do you tend to approach things more from a "get it done" perspective, or "I must understand everything and have absolute control"? Why do you want to learn programming, what are your ultimate goals?

 

The world of C++ is vast, and even though everyone needs to learn the same basics of the language, it's a lot easier and more beneficial to teach with some context.



#17 MarekKnows.com   Members   -  Reputation: 448

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 03:19 PM

I mentor people in C++ through my website.  If you're serious about learning C++ and you want to make games doing it, then come on down!


---
Free C++, OpenGL, and Game Development Video Tutorials @
www.MarekKnows.com
Play my free games: Ghost Toast, Zing, Jewel Thief





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