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Finding Game Jobs


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#1 Brick   Members   -  Reputation: 519

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:37 AM

Typically searching for "game developer" jobs with a job search engine doesn't bring anything up. Assuming you are looking for a non-online job what are some good ways to find a game developer job? Are there better websites or are there better keywords to use?



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#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9179

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:47 AM

Preface: I assume you are a first-time applicant (that you do not already have 2 or more years of full-time paid professional game programming experience).

 

The way to look for a job is:

 

1. Check gamedevmap and gameindustrymap for local game companies (within daily commuting distance of where you live).

2. If there are none, move.

3. Having identified local game companies, explore their websites. Not only their jobs pages but also all their products and everything.

4. Apply.

 

Also read:

http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson24.htm

http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson27.htm

http://www.igda.org/games-game-july-2010

http://www.igda.org/games-game-march-2010


-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 Brick   Members   -  Reputation: 519

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 11:21 AM

Thanks, Tom!



#4 Buster2000   Members   -  Reputation: 1585

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 01:38 AM


1. Check gamedevmap and gameindustrymap for local game companies (within daily commuting distance of where you live).

2. If there are none, move.

3. Having identified local game companies, explore their websites. Not only their jobs pages but also all their products and everything.

4. Apply.

 

5.  Also update your LinkedIn profile and let the games companies come to you ;)



#5 Poigahn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 517

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 07:47 AM

Have you tried searching on the Monster Website ?

 

Try also the classifieds here on this site.  Searching through the already posted ads or advertising yourself with credentials listed.

 

I have found a few, non-game programming jobs on Craigslist.com.   Many times small businesses, or people like us will enlist the help of the gainfully un-employed in order to save money over large companies offering services.

 

  Be prepared to work for free until your work is proven,  Usually don't get paid until job is done and working effectively


Your Brain contains the Best Program Ever Written : Manage Your Data Wisely !!


#6 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19820

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 12:23 PM


Be prepared to work for free until your work is proven,  Usually don't get paid until job is done and working effectively
Bad advice.

 

Unpaid jobs are probably unlawful due to minimum wage concerns. In the US there are six requirements that must be met for it to be legal to be an unpaid position.  Unpaid interns are only legal in rare situations where the intern is more of an observer or when the intern produces unusable content generally at a cost to the company. Software development would not qualify on 4/6 of the requirements. Specifically it is not a training environment but instead is a workplace environment, results are used to benefit of the company, the person potentially fills the slot of a regular employees rather than a non-displacing task of observing them, and employer derives direct advantage from the activities. Most states are cracking down on violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, and if you see a company violating it, report it.

 

If you are working on a contract basis you should be collecting money at every milestone. One of those paid milestones should be the signing of the contract, before any production work is complete. 


Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#7 Poigahn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 517

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 05:20 PM

 


Be prepared to work for free until your work is proven,  Usually don't get paid until job is done and working effectively
Bad advice.

 

Unpaid jobs are probably unlawful due to minimum wage concerns. In the US there are six requirements that must be met for it to be legal to be an unpaid position.  Unpaid interns are only legal in rare situations where the intern is more of an observer or when the intern produces unusable content generally at a cost to the company. Software development would not qualify on 4/6 of the requirements. Specifically it is not a training environment but instead is a workplace environment, results are used to benefit of the company, the person potentially fills the slot of a regular employees rather than a non-displacing task of observing them, and employer derives direct advantage from the activities. Most states are cracking down on violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, and if you see a company violating it, report it.

 

If you are working on a contract basis you should be collecting money at every milestone. One of those paid milestones should be the signing of the contract, before any production work is complete. 

 

It is obvious you misunderstood my comment, or maybe it was unclear.  Your explanation is what I meant.  I do not know about where you are at, but here, on a contract basis you may work 2+ weeks before your work is done, then once installed and verified that it works as described is when you get paid. Even then it may take an additional 30 days before payment is received.

 

That is what I meant by working and not getting paid.

 

Of course, if you are hired and go to work in an office setting, then you are and employee and fall under labor laws.

 

Sorry that you and maybe others Misunderstood.


Your Brain contains the Best Program Ever Written : Manage Your Data Wisely !!





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