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How much should i pay our Animator?


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#1 Fromfame   Members   -  Reputation: 129

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 05:14 AM

Hey,

 

We're recruiting an Animator to join our team and im not sure about how to divide the Animation payment per task.

 

For our 3D Artists its payment per level assets.

For code its level based as well,

 

Although since animations are loop-able and we're reusing rigs and models, i have no idea how to divide her payment and i dont want to risk making her over-work or under-work.

Anyone has any tips on how could i break this down?

 

for simplicity's sake, lets say the game is 10 levels and its $10 per task.


Edited by Fromfame, 11 September 2013 - 07:31 AM.


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#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8642

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:18 AM

Look at the latest Game Salary Survey. Figure out the ratio of artist pay to animator pay, and apply that ratio to your artist pay.


-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 Norman Barrows   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1845

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 02:46 PM

in the long run, overall,

value per man-hour = total man-hours / total profits.

 

of course this does not take into consideration how hard it is to find individuals capable of contributing those man-hours. for example, i would expect it might be harder to find a disney-skill-level animator than it would be to find a good 3d modeling artist.  its a rarer skillset - especially in this day and age. 

 

so not all man hours are created equal.

 

the term in the equation should be something like man-hours * skill value. IE skill-man-hours.


Norm Barrows

Rockland Software Productions

"Building PC games since 1988"

 

rocklandsoftware.net

 


#4 Fromfame   Members   -  Reputation: 129

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 02:05 AM

Norman we pay per objective not time, still good info thanks for sharing guys.



#5 HeroBiX   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 01:02 PM

Not often I hear paying per objective, but seems like a good way of doing it. I would say that for the total project they reccive $1000 (actually $1200, $200 is hold off as a "bonus"), reccive $250 start, put $250 after first milestone, $250 second and on delivery on time, recciving $550



#6 Norman Barrows   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1845

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 09:33 AM

Norman we pay per objective not time, still good info thanks for sharing guys.

 

 

 

and the time required for an objective determines its value.  perhaps modified by the skill set required.

 
so lets say you anticipate overall profits of $20 per hour, and you decide that animation coding, modeling, and other artwork are all equally valuable skills with a skill multiplier of 1.0 to keep it simple. and an animation takes 1 hour, then you should pay: 1 hour * $20 per hour base value * 1.0 skill mod = $20 per animation.
 
then its all about predicting profitability.
 
what you can do is go low on the base price per hour and add royalties (if any occur). that way you're covered if profits are low, and you don't cheat anyone if profits are high.

Norm Barrows

Rockland Software Productions

"Building PC games since 1988"

 

rocklandsoftware.net

 





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