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Tips on Digital/Real Orchestration - New Article Series


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#1 xiaoan   Members   -  Reputation: 911

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:49 PM

Hello all, I'm starting a new article series featuring short tips in orchestration. Here's a quick sampler!

 

 

Screen Shot 2013-09-17 at 10.57.32 PM.png

 

 

Digital Orchestration Tip #02 - Creating Movement in Background Harmony 


This short article serves as a quick tutorial in finding active alternatives to typical static "pad" writing when scoring a harmonic background.

In Bar 1 of the example, we see a relatively simply voiced "Static" G major triad. Violin I and Violas are in divisi, with Violas playing open strings for added sonority and the glassiness of strings played without vibrato. This is a perfectly acceptable solution and it sounds good. It definitely serves its purpose.

However, an alternative, more "Active" solution to a harmonic background is presented in Bar 2. The content is nearly identical, with key differences being:

1. Violin I is still playing divisi, but with the 2nd part arpeggiating the 3rd (B) and 5th (D) of the chord in order to add some movement and flesh out an entire G major triad.

2. Violin II is now playing an unmeasured trill on its original note (G), which subtly introduces the added 9th (A) of the chord to lend a slight sophistication to the harmony. This also occasionally creates an interval of a major 2nd with Violin I, creating a hazy effect.

3. Violas are playing the same notes (G and D), still on open strings, but creating movement by undulating slowly between them..

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In essence, we have used variety of measured and umeasured (slow and fast) ornamentations of the original notes to "excite" the harmonic background of the music, without creating a new rhythmic feel or adding any counterlines.

As always, though, you should use your ears to determine when such a technique is necessary, and to what degree. Sometimes all you really need is a pad.


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This article is part of a series I'm starting on my website. If you're interested, I will be archiving the articles here:

http://www.xiaoanmusic.net/#!articles/c13t2


Li Xiao'an

Composer | Music Director

www.xiaoanli.com (Personal)

www.eastcoastscoring.com

Twitter: @lxiaoan

 


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#2 nsmadsen   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3888

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 10:44 AM

Nice article! One suggestion - provide listening samples of the various approaches for your readers to further drive your point(s) home.

 

Thanks for posting this!

 

Nate


Nathan Madsen
Composer-Sound Designer
Madsen Studios

#3 xiaoan   Members   -  Reputation: 911

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 05:19 PM

Thanks for the idea! I'll think about it and perhaps do it if I have the time.


Li Xiao'an

Composer | Music Director

www.xiaoanli.com (Personal)

www.eastcoastscoring.com

Twitter: @lxiaoan

 


#4 xiaoan   Members   -  Reputation: 911

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 09:14 PM

Here's an article with a listening sample!

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153263475715375


Li Xiao'an

Composer | Music Director

www.xiaoanli.com (Personal)

www.eastcoastscoring.com

Twitter: @lxiaoan

 


#5 xiaoan   Members   -  Reputation: 911

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 08:57 AM

Digital Orchestration Tip #04 - Endless Harmony

 

 

Without going into too much theoretical detail, here is a quick and simple way to pull harmonic progressions out of thin air without having it sound too predictable.  

 

You can use this technique to create transitional material between sections, to modulate, or simply to add interest to a melodic line by changing its intervallic relationship with the harmony. There are many other uses too - quick aggressive brass hits that punctuate actions in a scene, brass swells, subtle underscoring etc...

 

 

Read the rest of the article here:




Li Xiao'an

Composer | Music Director

www.xiaoanli.com (Personal)

www.eastcoastscoring.com

Twitter: @lxiaoan

 





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