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C++ Libraries - Where to find a list ?


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#1 Poigahn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 520

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:10 PM

As I am transfering from a language that seems to encompass most everything I was coding, and moving more into learning C++, with the aide of several books, I find that they are lacking alot of imformation.

 

1 A certain piece of information is how many Libraries are there to C++ ?  Seems to be missing !!

 

2 Where can I find a list of these #include <thisifyouwanttodothat> and what those libraries do?

 


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#2 SiCrane   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9670

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:30 PM

There is no comprehensive list of C++ libraries available. Anyone can create a C++ library if they feel like it.



#3 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2499

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:30 PM

If you're coming from dotNet or Java, you'll find that C++ has a much smaller standard library than you are used to. 
 
The first place to start is the Standard C++ Library, sometimes (erroneously) referred to as the STL*. This contains lots of libraries relating to containers (lists, arrays, vectors, etc), strings (not a part of the language, but a library) and various other stuff (input/output streams, algorithms, etc).

 

There are also some newer libraries that are part of the C++11 standard that are not 100% supported by all compilers yet. Consult your compiler docs to see what is supported on your platform.

 

After that, you might want to have a look at the Boost C++ libraries. These are a group of peer-reviewed community submitted libraries that are generally of pretty high quality (several were accepted into the standard library in C++11). There's all kinds of stuff here from file systems to networking to more esoteric concepts like template meta-programming.

 

Going from there, there isn't really a centralised repository. You will find commercial libraries (from the likes of Microsoft) or FOSS libs in various places around the net. 

 

So to answer your questions:

 

1. There are a lot of C++ libraries. There's no meaningfully correct answer to this question.

 

2. Generally the include file and the description of the library functionality will be found with the libraries documentation. Some have excellent documentation, some will have little more than a header and possibly a few simple examples.

 

 

*Please don't call it that, it hasn't been accurate for over a decade now. I'm only mentioning it because you will sometimes read about people calling it the "STL".


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#4 pinebanana   Members   -  Reputation: 475

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 03:16 AM

The first place to start is the Standard C++ Library, sometimes (erroneously) referred to as the STL*. This contains lots of libraries relating to containers (lists, arrays, vectors, etc), strings (not a part of the language, but a library) and various other stuff (input/output streams, algorithms, etc).

+1 for linking to en.cppreference instead of cplusplus.com. @OP Don't use cplusplus.com for a reference on the standard library (for one, it's not official documentation).

 

Also, OP, if you're looking for a particular library for C++ that does something the standard library (or even boost) doesn't offer, e.g. a rendering library, then google it. Google is your friend, you could also try to look on GitHub or BitBucket if you can't find it on google or another search engine.


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#5 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6306

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:01 AM

The OP might also want to look at the API for his target platform (Those APIs should provide access to all functionality the platform has to offer)

 

Documentation for Windows is available on msdn


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#6 Poigahn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 520

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:55 AM

I Thank each of you for your input.  I found The Information referenced and was able to find several answers to my questions at these locations.

There was several items That I was looking for but was looking in the wrong catagories.  Several post by others whom were searching for the same answers to the same questions I had,   accelerated my search!

 

Your feedback and quick responses is the main reason I joined this Forum.  Keep up the good work!!

I will do my best to give back as much, if not more, help to others.


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