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tomcat server (or like) on top of webserver


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#1 zfvesoljc   Members   -  Reputation: 440

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 01:44 AM

I'm working an application, let's call it a tool server which will accompany the target applications. The tool server is written in c/c++ and its embedding mongoose web server to allow http/websocket connections. To the target application it's connected via customized network library. The basic logic works: web server hosts a web page, which is using JS and websocket and the communication flow targetapp <-> toolserver <-> webpage is working as intended. This allows us to create "simple" web apps for stats tracking, logging and some data editing. But to do some more "serious" apps we need java applets. To run them we need a proper java server like tomcat.

 

I'm doing some research on how to combine these two things. I read about mod_jk which is a link between tomcat and apache web server, but since I'm kinda new in these waters, I'm looking for some advice.

 

1) What would be the "smoothest" way to integrate tomcat server into existing setup? I'd prefer to have a copy only "installation", so when toolserver is started the tomcat should also start, and vice versa on stopping. Just install run/stop service?

 

2) Biggest issue is how to link web server with tomcat. I presume the webserver would still be entry point? How to handle websocket communication from tomcat webpage to web server and then to tool server?



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#2 SillyCow   Members   -  Reputation: 883

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:00 AM

use a proxy to redirect some url paths to your app, and some to other servers.

 

You can either use "Apache web-server" or NGINX to do that.

With apache: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/mod_proxy.html

 

Then you get apache to point certain paths to your customized server, and other paths to tomcat (running on a different port).

 

The nice thing about this method, is that it can redirect any HTTP traffic (no need for other plugins) . The bummer, is that it has some performance issues with regards to rerouting http traffic. But unless you are serving large video files you shouldn't worry about that.


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#3 hplus0603   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5532

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 01:43 PM

to do some more "serious" apps we need java applets. To run them we need a proper java server like tomcat.

 

Why?

 

Java applets is a dead client-side technology. Browsers are starting to drop Java support entirely (for security reasons.)

Java servlets are a server-side technology that lets you write server functionality in Java, and they run in tomcat -- I'm going to assume that's what you mean.

 

If you can write C/C++ code, why couldn't you write the server functionality in C/C++?

 

Separately, if you want to use another environment, why would you use tomcat, instead of node.js, or mochiweb, or yesod? (Node.js is especially nice for quick development, as it can share JS code with the front end)

 

The easiest way to use multiple server technologies is to host them on different ports. There's nothing saying a HTTP connection needs to happen on port 80, or a HTTPS port needs to happen on port 443.

If, for some reason (such as cross-origin rules) you need the same base hostname, you can use a proxy that can send different incoming paths to different local ports. You'd configure nginx or whatever to send www.yourhost.com/somepath to the C++ side, listening on port A, and www.yourhost.com/otherpath to the other-server side, listening on port B. As an additional benefit, you can then block ports A and B from the greater internet, lowering the exposed surface area a little bit.


enum Bool { True, False, FileNotFound };

#4 zfvesoljc   Members   -  Reputation: 440

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 02:45 AM

Thanks guys. Multiserver logic is clear now.

 

As for java, I'm still figuring out if this is actually still a valid requirement.



#5 zfvesoljc   Members   -  Reputation: 440

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 04:31 AM

Well as I understand it, we are calling java code from js:

<%
javafunc();
%> 


#6 hplus0603   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5532

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:10 AM

as I understand it, we are calling java code from js


That's not how it works. The code you suggested looks like a Java server page. That page is parsed by the Java server serving the page, and calls the function, before the client sees it at all.
enum Bool { True, False, FileNotFound };




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