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Browser games magic


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#1 teckpow   Members   -  Reputation: 355

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 03:19 PM

Hi everyone! I am a web developer and I am quite interested in browser games. I would like to ask you where can I begin? I mean what is necessary to build one? I'm not asking for a guide on how to, but for kind of examples like what should I use and why. I saw some people basing their game entirely on Adobe Flash, others using only HTML5 magic with JS, so my question is which "tools" may I use to develop a browser game? Thanks in advance!
-teckpow

 



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#2 shadowisadog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2563

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:23 PM

I am not entirely sure that I understand the question.

 

Both HTML5 and Flash are capable of creating browser based games. Both choices are fairly popular and both have advantages and disadvantages. Flash has been used for a ton of games but it limits options for Mobile, HTML5 is a big focus now but it can be slower than Flash (in my experience), ect.

 

Game Maker Studio and Construct 2 can both make HTML5 games.

 

I don't think I would use HTML5 directly, I would probably at least use some sort of game library like http://craftyjs.com/ or http://melonjs.org/index.html or http://jawsjs.com/.


Edited by shadowisadog, 01 November 2013 - 07:24 PM.


#3 Dragonsoulj   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2126

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:15 PM

All depends on what kind of game you want. If it is mostly text based and just a few images to display, you could just use X/HTML and some server side language like PHP. What kind of game are you wanting to make?



#4 HappyCoder   Members   -  Reputation: 2878

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 11:28 PM

Having made a few html5 games I would definitely say that is a good option. You can make games that don't require plugins and you can make some pretty good content using html5. It is, however, harder to package it up to distribute on the web and due to difference in browsers your game might not work in every browser. Despite that I think it is a good way to go. If you want to get started with some basic 2D games look up how to use the canvas tag for drawing and using requestAnimationFrame to establish a recurring update/draw cycle.

Flash is also a good option but I have never used it so I cannot give much details in my recommendation.

#5 ram64   Members   -  Reputation: 860

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 05:24 AM

Depends on what platform you target. For desktop only I for one would recommend (currently) making Flash games. You will have better performance than HTML5 and cross-browser compatibility. If you target desktop and mobile you could try using HTML5 but still it's a lot of work to make games work the same in every browser (mobile and desktop). Also, performace is an issue with low and mid-range mobile devices. For mobile I think it's far better to bulild a game as an app and keep it as a browser game for desktop.

 

Now about the frameworks. I recommend two frameworks that I find very good and easy to use. Both can be used to make games that target both desktop and mobile, Flash and HTML5.

 

For Flash games:

CitrusEngine - It's a free framework that combines the power of Stage3D technology to build 2D and 3D games with GPU accelerated graphics through Starling and Away3D. It is easy to use, has an active forum, good documentation and some examples to get you started. It has built it classes to get you up and started quickly with platformer games. Also you can publish the games as mobile apps using Adobe AIR runtime.

 

For HTML5 games:

Phaser - It's an awesome HTML5 framework, quite new but I think it's easy to get started with it, the learning curve being not that steep. There are ton of examples and a very active community forum where you can find answer to any issue you might encounter. It has a good performance on desktop for 2D games. It's supposed to be a mobile framework to so you could build browser games for mobile too but I can't speak for the performance on mobile, I haven't tested it yet.

 

Of course the best case scenario would be to build games in both versions (Flash and HTML5) to reach as many users as possible, even the ones that don't have a modern web browser (that pesky IE7, IE8, IE9).



#6 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3165

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 07:09 AM

Hi,

 

Now is a good time to get into Canvas/HTML 5 and anticipate using JavaScript with Canvas as the technology advances in the future.  Its a great time for Canvas, as a matter of course.

 

If you only want to target regular computer browsers and not smart phones, then Flash might be a better technology for performance reasons, allowing you to create and play some games that are demanding on resources.  Look at the Flash games on Facebook and you will see what I mean.

 

For truly hardware cross-platform then I would recommend HTML5 and JavaScript.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#7 snacktime   Members   -  Reputation: 308

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 10:50 AM

The answer totally depends on the type of game you want to make.

 

For some types of games Unity is by far the best choice.  I put together a complete mmo tech demo in unity for a project I was working on inside of a month.

 

Javascript and html5 are limited, again it depends on the type of game you want to make.  Javascript is a horrible language, that's something you will have to reconcile with and just deal with. For a good laugh when you have 5 minutes see this: https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/wat.

 

I've been watching html5 for years.  Flash became popular primarily because of how bad javascript was, and how slow the html5 standards were progressing.  Nothing has really changed.  All that has happened is that people have managed to squeeze more out of a stagnant platform.   Html5 will never become what people want it to be.  It simply can't when it's hamstrung by a bad language and a standards body that's paralyzed by politics.  Platforms like Unity or chrome's native code abilities are examples of where I think the future of games on the browser are headed.

 

Flash is kind of a dying breed.  It's good for specific games but I would be really nervous about using it on any new large projects.

 

Chris



#8 mfdesigner   Members   -  Reputation: 107

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 11:51 AM

Perhaps you can try our cloud-based HTML5 game engine. It uses only web technologies and run in the browser.

It follows a top-down object-oriented design.  Basically, it means you can visually (drag and drop) to wrap any

lower level codes and media assets into reusable and shareable components.  Once published to our store, 

others can build apps from your components.

 

It took me only a few minutes to create these scenes:

 

Pandora's Box   

Vandalize David 

 

We are currently working on a new technology called the "blueprint game generator".  Blueprint is an XML file that directs and guides 

users' components to work together to form a game.  Any user can create and share blueprints using Blueprint Composer.  Our code generator will be able to create the

finished products from user-submitted blueprints (e.g. by dynamically pulling required game resources from our repository.)


Edited by mfdesigner, 02 November 2013 - 12:15 PM.


#9 mippy   Members   -  Reputation: 1004

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 12:21 PM

A big problem with HTML5 games is monetization. Flash games are somewhat sealed, while HTML5 games are very transparent. HTML5 is also not a finished standard and support by different browsers differs a lot. Tablets and phones have weak hardware support for the canvas(or so I've heard) which is kind of weakening the "cross-platforminess" of the technology. 

 

A big problem with the canvas is that you cant render svg or other forms of vector data directly on it. You will need a framework that can convert your produce for it. A full game production suit like Unity or Game Maker can help here. 

 

If you are serious about making games for browsers you would probably have to produce a ton of them and licence them, or you could build a backend-heavy thing which relies on player accounts and in-game purchases. 

 

Personally I like working with the canvas and web technology because I don't know anything else. It's also easy and fun to share stuff with friends and you never have to ask people to download strange things.

 

If you are a beginner in games production but experienced in web-technology then try building a simple game with some balls and blocks with plain javascript, then add modules which you see fit. I'm looking into CreateJS which works well with the requestAnimationFrame feature. KineticJS works with getTimeout wich is not as good.  


Edited by mippy, 02 November 2013 - 12:32 PM.


#10 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3165

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 12:32 PM

teckpow,

 

 

We haven't even touched upon using Java with web/browser game development. Some developers have used Java to mostly displace JavaScript though the two are implemented differently.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#11 teckpow   Members   -  Reputation: 355

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 07:27 PM

Thank you all for your advices guys! I really appreciate it!! :)
 

 

 

PS: Excuse me sir, but where did that come from? I don't remember saying anything about Java

teckpow,

 

 

We haven't even touched upon using Java with web/browser game development. Some developers have used Java to mostly displace JavaScript though the two are implemented differently.



#12 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3165

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 07:57 PM


PS: Excuse me sir, but where did that come from? I don't remember saying anything about Java

 

 

Okay, I know your type.  Excuse me.


Edited by 3Ddreamer, 06 November 2013 - 10:37 AM.

Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#13 teckpow   Members   -  Reputation: 355

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:48 AM

Sir, I don't understand what you mean, but I didn't mean to offend you.

#14 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3165

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:46 AM

so my question is which "tools" may I use to develop a browser game? Thanks in advance!
-teckpow

 

Teckpow, you originally seemed open to a lot of ideas on how to make a browser game.

 

 

 

Thank you all for your advices guys! I really appreciate it!! smile.png

 

 

PS: Excuse me sir, but where did that come from? I don't remember saying anything about Java

teckpow,

 

 

We haven't even touched upon using Java with web/browser game development. Some developers have used Java to mostly displace JavaScript though the two are implemented differently.

 

 

 

Since you asked about tools for making a browser game, I was trying to let you know that HTML and JavaScript are not the only options. 

 

For an application creation standpoint, it is possible to make games for browsers that run from the server side using Java, perhaps in conjunction with HTML and/or JavaScript.  Java IDE has support for such full integration.   About ten years ago this was more common than today, but the technology actually works very well and is still a consideration.

 

For that matter, we also didn't get into Flash technology.  rolleyes.gif

 

No offense taken, but I don't want to waste my time.  


Edited by 3Ddreamer, 06 November 2013 - 10:47 AM.

Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer





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