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How translate a polygon on Earth?


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#1   Members   -  Reputation: 228

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 06:15 AM

Ok, how to translate polygon on sphere(or better Earth ellipsoid) that polygon proportions(sizes, corners angles) stay the same as before translation?



#2   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2590

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 07:01 AM

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So basically?

 

2alSC.png

 

I think you'll have to give us a little more information on what you're trying to do. Are you talking about spherical trigonometry? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spherical_trigonometry


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#3   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 19670

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:12 AM

For a sphere, the answer is to use the verb "rotate" (around the center of the sphere) instead of "translate". For an ellipsoid like Earth, in general you can only rotate around the North-South axis without deforming anything.



#4   Members   -  Reputation: 1777

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:14 AM

So basically?

 

...

 

I think you'll have to give us a little more information on what you're trying to do. Are you talking about spherical trigonometry? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spherical_trigonometry

 

+1 for making me laugh.



#5   Members   -  Reputation: 1753

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:29 AM

So basically?

 

...

 

I think you'll have to give us a little more information on what you're trying to do. Are you talking about spherical trigonometry? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spherical_trigonometry

 

+1 for the most awesome answer I have seen in a long while.



#6 slalrbalr   Banned   -  Reputation: 2005

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:38 AM

+1 for awesome MSPaint skills.






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