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Question about RAM


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#1 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1382

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 05:31 PM

ram_zps8f4545ec.png

 

From what I see here, I got 1.96 GB of RAM.

 

How do I know how much RAM my labtop can actually have even though it starts off with 1.96 GB of RAM?

 

What does the  first @ 2.00 GHz and second 2.00 GHz mean?

 

I noticed with the amount of RAM I have, the computer lags with 3 windows open. Why is this?


Edited by warnexus, 24 November 2013 - 05:41 PM.


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#2 Nypyren   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3693

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:41 PM

How do I know how much RAM my labtop can actually have even though it starts off with 1.96 GB of RAM?


If your RAM is installed in removable slots, you can put the maximum supported size in all available slots. You would look up the maximum supported capacity and RAM type on the manufacturer's website. For self-built computers, you look this up on the motherboard manufacturer's web site. If your RAM is soldered directly onto the motherboard, you won't be able to replace it easily at all.
 

What does the  first @ 2.00 GHz and second 2.00 GHz mean?


One of the two will be just a string presented with the processor details and the other will be the actual speed it's currently running at (which can change if it's overclocked).
 

I noticed with the amount of RAM I have, the computer lags with 3 windows open.


How did you come to the conclusion that the two are related? 3 windows of what?

Edited by Nypyren, 24 November 2013 - 06:45 PM.


#3 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1382

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:47 PM


How did you come to the conclusion that the two are related? 3 windows of what?

Edited by Nypyren, Today, 08:45 PM.

 

Ah sorry. My mistake it was actually 9 window tabs open from other websites. Turns out the lag was caused from a Shockwave plugin that stopped working for Youtube videos.



#4 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1382

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:50 PM


One of the two will be just a string presented with the processor details and the other will be the actual speed it's currently running at (which can change if it's overclocked).

 

Thanks. I was reading up on overclocking and it is suppose make the computer faster but there are a ton of downside including using more power which generates more heat. Overclocking seems like a bad idea despite making the computer work faster.



#5 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3705

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 07:00 PM

Don't overclock laptops.


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#6 Nypyren   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3693

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 07:05 PM

Don't overclock laptops.


QFE. Overclocking increases heat and power load. Laptops are notoriously bad at dealing with high amounts of either one.

#7 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1382

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 07:51 PM

Don't overclock laptops.

ok. =]



#8 codejockey   Members   -  Reputation: 77

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 11:30 PM

Here's your CPU  and based on what I see it's a 64-bit processor which means you have the minimum for it at 2GB of RAM.  When it starts "lagging" a little the OS (assuming Windows) is caching to the hard drive.  If you have a 64-bit OS and vid card then you can go as high as 8GB.  Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.  64 bit means it can address a memory location in ram as high as 7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF or 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 and that's a whole lot of bytes!



#9 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8158

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 11:43 PM


Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.

640kB of memory ought to be enough for anyone! History repeats itself wink.png

 


64 bit means it can address a memory location in ram as high as 7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF or 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 and that's a whole lot of bytes!

 

Yes, though in practice most current CPU's only implement a 48-bit address space (there appear to be other technical difficulties with a whole 64-bit address space, check out this SO thread). Which should suffice for a decade or two, hopefully, but I have no doubt people will still manage to run out of memory when our computers have several hundred terabytes of RAM.


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

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#10 BitMaster   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3649

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 07:58 AM

Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.


The default memory load of my work system (MSVC with the relevant projects opened, browser and a few other tools) clocks out at just under 4GB of used memory. Add a virtual machine or two running and suddenly 8GB does not sound like so much, especially if you want enough breathing space to do something demanding like compiling a largish complex library on four or eight cores.

More than 8GB of RAM is not something a lot of people get a use out of, but it's far from unbelievable.

#11 TheComet   Members   -  Reputation: 1385

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 08:09 AM

Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.

 

Video editing consumes an unbelievable amount of memory. 16GB is easily consumed with larger projects.


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#12 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1382

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 10:58 AM

Here's your CPU  and based on what I see it's a 64-bit processor which means you have the minimum for it at 2GB of RAM.  When it starts "lagging" a little the OS (assuming Windows) is caching to the hard drive.  If you have a 64-bit OS and vid card then you can go as high as 8GB.  Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.  64 bit means it can address a memory location in ram as high as 7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF or 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 and that's a whole lot of bytes!

It is a 32 bits Windows XP laptop. Doh should have said that too. The reason I said it is 32 bits is because I remember I needed to use the 32 bit version of the Eclipse IDE.

 

On a side note: Why is x86 means 32 bits and x64 means 64 bits?


Edited by warnexus, 25 November 2013 - 11:06 AM.


#13 TheComet   Members   -  Reputation: 1385

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 11:04 AM


It is a 32 bits laptop. The reason I said it is 32 bits is because I remember I needed to use the 32 bit version of the Eclipse IDE

Your CPU uses a 64-bit instruction set, as can be seen if you click the link.

 

32-bit applications will obviously still work on 64-bit architectures, they're just limited to 4GiB of RAM.


Edited by TheComet, 25 November 2013 - 11:06 AM.

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#14 Brother Bob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 7780

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 11:15 AM


On a side note: Why is x86 means 32 bits and x64 means 64 bits?

 

Here's for you to read up on the x86 family; clicky. In short, x86 is the whole family of CPUs from many years ago, and x86-64, commonly denotes as x64, are the 64-bit CPUs in the x86 family.



#15 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4510

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 11:42 AM

 

Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.

 

Video editing consumes an unbelievable amount of memory. 16GB is easily consumed with larger projects.

 

Heh, I recall editing PAL videos (which is what... 576i or something?) with a machine that had 256MB (which was a lot at that time!) and a 3x14GB RAID. Which was mixing and encoding at roughly 5-8 times real time, and 100% CPU bound. laugh.png

 

Oh the good old times, wait 3-4 minutes to get a low-res preview every time you change something.

 

But yeah, I can see how you'd easily get I/O bound and need huge amounts of buffer space nowadays with GPU-backed encoders and multi-core machines.

 

With that said, putting extra RAM into a computer (laptop or any other) is the single best thing you can do. That, and a SSD.



#16 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5770

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 11:50 AM

 

Why anyone would need more than that on a desk/lap top is beyond me.


The default memory load of my work system (MSVC with the relevant projects opened, browser and a few other tools) clocks out at just under 4GB of used memory. Add a virtual machine or two running and suddenly 8GB does not sound like so much, especially if you want enough breathing space to do something demanding like compiling a largish complex library on four or eight cores.

More than 8GB of RAM is not something a lot of people get a use out of, but it's far from unbelievable.

 

 

i use 16GB at work and i run out from time to time, its not difficult to run out of RAM on a developer machine,i hardly ever close applications, i just swap to a new virtual desktop when i switch project leaving everything(IDEs, browsers, VMs, editors, etc) related to the previous project up and running. (Makes quick fixes/changes in old projects alot faster). More RAM = higher productivity. (a few extra CPU cores is extremely useful as well)


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