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Know too much in theory but practice ?


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#1 AhmedCoeia   Members   -  Reputation: 373

Posted 23 December 2013 - 05:57 PM

Hi All,

 

I'm an EE, I know computer science by myself, studied c++, game programming since I was 13 years old. I do know too much about Electronics Engineering, Embedded Systems, firmware,..etc. 

At the same time I know theory of computer science, you can ask me about algorithms, data structures,  I can tell you yes selection sort is a sorting algorithm with complexity  O(n2), in 3D game programming, I know about spatial data structures, skeletal animation,..etc. I read too much, but I practised very few. I didn't write too much code. I'm currently 27 years old, tried to apply for qualcomm, google, found problems in applying code on board, I also find problems in solving algorithms on my own... 

 

I'm thinking about doing my msc and PhD, and keep being knowledgable but didn't practice much ? or what should I do ? 

 

are anyone like me too here ?



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#2 Kjansen92   Members   -  Reputation: 231

Posted 23 December 2013 - 06:28 PM

No, not me.

 

But I have heard that to be able to be your profession while you are learning it is a rare thing. 

 

Although there could be more awesome things as far as I know, to have the capacity to learn and do simultaneously with programming would be fascinating.



#3 ActiveUnique   Members   -  Reputation: 853

Posted 23 December 2013 - 07:07 PM

I'd like to be the first to say, you can always start practicing now. You may have to acknowledge at some point that you have a great interest in learning about the subject, rather than applying it.  It is always worth your time to figure yourself out.


I've read about the idea guy. It's a serious misnomer. You really want to avoid the lazy team.


#4 rpiller   Members   -  Reputation: 706

Posted 23 December 2013 - 07:10 PM

I'm confused as why you would spend all that time learning something and not want to or be excited about using it. That just doesn't compute for me. The reason I got into coding is because I wanted to create things on the computer. Why did you get into them?



#5 AhmedCoeia   Members   -  Reputation: 373

Posted 24 December 2013 - 04:14 AM

I was curious on how games work and how electronics work. :( 

When I knew the reasons, even in details, I stopped :/,  I felt that I dont need any practise 



#6 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2132

Posted 24 December 2013 - 05:41 AM

Write more code.  For me, there is no way I can go by without understanding the practical knowledge, which is vastly different than theoretical knowledge.

 

For example, you can go read the Oauth2 specification.  If you read from top to bottom, front to back, you will understand how it works, and it's actually quite simple and makes sense.  But, go ahead try to implement it.  Holy fuck, the amount of details you need to worry about is a lot - data modeling, security, api design, etc.  These are the things that are not covered by the theory, and they are perhaps more important than the theory.



#7 AhmedCoeia   Members   -  Reputation: 373

Posted 24 December 2013 - 07:30 AM

Yea but in which area ? The problem that I distracted my mind into a lot of topics, firmware, game programming, computer vision, data structures :(



#8 ActiveUnique   Members   -  Reputation: 853

Posted 24 December 2013 - 07:40 AM

Yea but in which area ? The problem that I distracted my mind into a lot of topics, firmware, game programming, computer vision, data structures sad.png

What is it about these things that you like? Can you enjoy talking about them?


I've read about the idea guy. It's a serious misnomer. You really want to avoid the lazy team.


#9 rpiller   Members   -  Reputation: 706

Posted 24 December 2013 - 07:53 AM

I was curious on how games work and how electronics work. sad.png

When I knew the reasons, even in details, I stopped :/,  I felt that I dont need any practise 

 

It's not about feeling that you need practice, it's about WANTING to do it. If you don't want to do these things then you probably don't have much of a passion for them. Find something you do have a passion for.



#10 Waterlimon   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2635

Posted 24 December 2013 - 08:39 AM

I feel as if practise is just theory nobody bothered to write down, because theres so much of this. Eg. if we take "good code" guidelines, we mostly have overly unspecific guidelines which can be used to analyse code to decide whether its good or bad through a long and tedious process (since being abstract you cant directly apply them), and practise is mostly just going more specific (as in memorizing how these guidelines apply to certain things so you dont have to think about it each time)

 

So, theory is the knowledge you can use to find a solution, and practise is a process of derieving more specific knowledge from the nonspecific theoretical knowledge such that you can apply it without spending days thinking about it each time.

 

Since you are interested in theory, look at practise as forming more specific theoretical knowledge (which you might as well write down if you feel like it). Instead of being given the theory, you must create it yourself. Im sure you could find pieces from various sources, but these are pieces and thus not very useful considering that you need a ton of such knowledge and will probably forget them anyways if you just read them without actually needing them at the moment.


o3o





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