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Best way for a complete beginner to learn Open GL.


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#1 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 08:31 PM

Hi guys i am new to these forums, its nice to meet you all at this wonderful website.

 

 

 

 

I am a experienced C/C++/C# Programmer which is strong in all three for 3 years and knows good O O P design and techniques like polymorphism and encapsulation etc. 

 

 

 

 

I also know 3D maths (Vectors,Linear Alegbra,Quaternions,Matrices etc.), i also plan to make a 3D game with Open GL and some other libraries.

I have helped before in game development as an artist so i know how long it takes to develop a game not to mention i am doing this solo so it will take aprox 3/4 years depending on how fast i go.

 

 

 

 

Anyway do any of you know good Open GL Learning Resources, preferably modern Open GL 3.3+.

 

 

 

 

I am very practical and want to get straight to the point in programming, what i mean is that i learn by doing, most of the Open GL i went through is mostly theoretical, now i do know that theory is very important as well but the resources i went through were mostly theoretical but had virtually nearly no code.I want to actually do something as well as reading theory.Also there other tutorials that don't even tell you where exactly to put the code or tell you the structure of a Open GL program. The only thing i know is the rendering pipeline.

 

 

 

 

I already fully tried these tutorials/resources:

 

 

 

-Red Book 8th Edition. ( Worst of them all )

-Super Bible 5th Edition.

-Open GL 4.0 a Core specification.

-GLSL 4.0 Cookbook.

-Open GL insights.

-Beginning game programming through Open GL second edition.

-open.gl

-Modern Open GL graphics programming.

-http://www.opengl-tutorial.org ( GLFW outdated );

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Currently the libraries i use for rendering purposes only are :

 

-Gainput ( User Input );

 

-GLFW ( Context&Windowing);

 

-GLEW ( Extension Loading );

 

-freeGlut ( Updated Version and better version of GLUT ).;

 

-Assimp ( Model Loader );

 

 

 

I would highly appreciate any help at all happy.png. Thank you for reading. 

 

Edit:

Could you please move this to Open GL. Thank you.


Edited by DragonBooster, 23 December 2013 - 08:50 PM.


#2 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 24458

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:41 PM

Have you looked at Learning Modern 3d Graphics Programmingsmile.png

 

I haven't used it myself, but it seems fairly popular and might be the sort of resource you're looking for.  It goes into quite some detail on theory, but I believe there are plenty of well-explained code samples included as well.



#3 richardurich   Members   -  Reputation: 1187

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:49 PM

Here are some extra resources. Just poke around and find one you're comfortable using to learn from.

http://antongerdelan.net/opengl/

http://www.mbsoftworks.sk/index.php?page=tutorials&series=1

http://www.rastertek.com/tutgl40.html

http://www.lighthouse3d.com/tutorials/glsl-core-tutorial/

http://www.opengl-tutorial.org/



#4 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:19 AM

Thank you for the resources guys, i highly appreciate it biggrin.png .



#5 Irlan Robson   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3817

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 10:05 AM

Use shaders.



#6 Irlan Robson   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3817

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 08:57 AM

IMHO: don't lose your time with fixed-function pipeline (I've lost 6 months studying that) because your lines of codes will grow exponentially, and with shaders, you will learn  interesting stuffs at the same time knowing that you are in the right way of learning OpenGL. Also, never hardcode geometry (use OBJ models or something for the job). cool.png  


Edited by irlanrobson, 26 December 2013 - 09:00 AM.


#7 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8505

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:59 AM


Have you looked at Learning Modern 3d Graphics Programming

I learnt with this one. And at the time I didn't even had half the experience the OP has (instead of 3 years with C++ I think I had more like 3 months with it biggrin.png ).

 

It starts head on with the more modern OpenGL 3.3 (core profile) programmable pipeline, so no fixed-function cruft, and has all the matrix/vector/rasterization theory you need to get going. It has a series of small programs organized on a big workspace so you can follow them and tear them apart on your IDE of choice.


Edited by TheChubu, 26 December 2013 - 11:05 AM.

"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

My journals: dustArtemis ECS framework and Making a Terrain Generator


#8 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 06:26 PM

Thank you very much guys, i will definitely check out Learning 3D Modern Graphics Programming.



#9 MarekKnows.com   Members   -  Reputation: 1036

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 07:13 AM

I'm currently building a video tutorial series on my website that covers OpenGL shaders that you might be interested in.


---
Free C++, OpenGL, and Game Development Video Tutorials @
www.MarekKnows.com
Play my free games: Ghost Toast, Zing, Jewel Thief


#10 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 07:51 AM

Interesting. I will check it out and thanks, however, i have a trouble learning from videos. Thanks anyway smile.png

 

The Chubu, did ArcSynthesis help you learn most of Open GL or did you use another resource with it?


Edited by DragonBooster, 29 December 2013 - 08:06 AM.


#11 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 07:55 AM

IMHO: don't lose your time with fixed-function pipeline (I've lost 6 months studying that) because your lines of codes will grow exponentially, and with shaders, you will learn  interesting stuffs at the same time knowing that you are in the right way of learning OpenGL. Also, never hardcode geometry (use OBJ models or something for the job). cool.png  

Thanks for the advice smile.png and i do know the shaders are highly important in modern GL but if i am making a rendering engine for a game, i would also have to use the pipeline with shaders if i recall correctly? Or would i mostly use shaders? I am still quite new so sorry if these questions are typical or overused.



#12 richardurich   Members   -  Reputation: 1187

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 12:00 PM

You do not need to use the fixed-function pipeline in modern OpenGL. In most cases, you will exclusively use shaders. Personally, I don't even know how to use the fixed-function pipeline in OpenGL since I was using Direct3D back in those days.



#13 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 01:26 PM

You do not need to use the fixed-function pipeline in modern OpenGL. In most cases, you will exclusively use shaders. Personally, I don't even know how to use the fixed-function pipeline in OpenGL since I was using Direct3D back in those days.

Thanks, i was thinking mostly of using shaders in Open GL since you are right that the newer Open GL is heavily reliant on Shaders if i am not mistaken. But say if i want to import models or if i want to move models using gainput. Would i have to use the fixed-function pipeline?



#14 Zero_Breaker   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 12:36 AM

Guys thank you all for the help. All the resources your provided are very helpful and i am starting to understand Open GL.

 

The Arcsynthesis book is phenomanal and it explains Open GL very well. This is a amazing site and i wanted to say thanks.

 

biggrin.png

 

If anyone else would like to learn Open GL or get started with it as a beginner than as the others suggested, i highly recommend : http://www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/index.html.

 

The author is incredible.






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