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exercise 35 error after play the game


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#1 Kurai Tsubasa   Members   -  Reputation: 207

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 06:12 AM

I already reach the exercise 35 learnpythonthehardway and i think it is really fun making an adventure text game.But i got some error after playing it.I tried to figure it out but i thing there is nothing wrong :

 

File "C:\Documents and Settings\User\My Documents\Notepad++\Project\ex35.py",
line 76, in <module>
start()
File "C:\Documents and Settings\User\My Documents\Notepad++\Project\ex35.py",
line 69, in start
bear_room()
File "C:\Documents and Settings\User\My Documents\Notepad++\Project\ex35.py",
line 37, in bear_room
gold_room()
File "C:\Documents and Settings\User\My Documents\Notepad++\Project\ex35.py",
line 16, in gold_room
dead("You good greedy bastard!")
File "C:\Documents and Settings\User\My Documents\Notepad++\Project\ex35.py",
line 59, in dead
exit(0)
SystemExit: 0

 

That is a bunch of error i wonder what is wrong with my script.I can run it perfectly fine.

 

here my script:

 

from sys import exit

def gold_room():
print "This is full of gold. How much do you take?"

next = raw_input("> ")
if "0" in next or "1" in next:
how_much = int(next)
else:
dead("man,learn how to type a number.")

if how_much < 50:
print "nice you're good greedy,you win!"
exit(0)
else:
dead("You good greedy bastard!")


def bear_room():
print "There is a bear here."
print "The bear has a bunch of honey."
print "The fat bear is in front of another door."
print "How are you going to move the bear?"
bear_moved = False

while True:
next = raw_input("> ")

if next == "take honey":
dead("The bear looks at you then slaps your face off.")
elif next == "taunt bear" and not bear_moved:
print "The bear has moved from door."
bear_moved = True
elif next == "Taunt bear" and bear_moved:
dead("The bear gets pissed off and chews your leg off.")
elif next == "Open door" and bear_moved:
gold_room()
else:
print "I got no idea what that means."


def cthulhu_room():
print "Here you see the great evil Cthulhu."
print "He, it, whatever stares at you and you go insane."
print "Do you flee for your life or eat your head?"

next = raw_input("> ")

if "flee" in text:
start()
elif"head" in next:
dead("Well that was tasty!")
else:
cthulhu_room()


def dead(why):
print why,"Good job!"
exit(0)

def start():
print "You are in a dark room."
print "there is a door to your right and left."
print "Which one do you take?"

next = raw_input("> ")

if next == "left":
bear_room()
elif next == "right":
cthulhu_room()
else:
dead("You stumble around the room until you starve.")


start()

 

And there is something i want to ask,what is int() do? and why the code is written from backward but when i tried put the def start(),def cthulhu_room,def bear_room,def dead,and def gold room it still work.Are def can be place anywhere so it doesn't matter where you put it,if it in ends or first or it may make some bugs that i didn't notice?

Thank you so much your answer is really appreciated it.biggrin.png


Edited by Kurai Tsubasa, 29 December 2013 - 04:19 AM.


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#2 NoAdmiral   Members   -  Reputation: 654

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 07:35 AM

Exercise 35 of what?

 

int(next) looks like it's casting the next variable as an int, but I can't be sure because I've never used python. I would suggest using your favorite internet-based search-engine to find out more. Also, I think if you're asking what your code does, you might want to consider going back a few exercises to make sure that you're fully understanding everything that you're coding. It's a lot easier to copy code than it is to write code.

 

A good strategy that I use whenever I learn a new concept (working on Ai right now), is to make one or two or three (however many you need to, really) programs that implement whatever you just learned. Maybe the second or third program can alter or expand on the original concept or use it for a different system or what-have-you--it's all about being able to apply what you've learned to novel situations (because rarely will life or programming present you with anything else).


Inspiration from my tea:

"Never wish life were easier. Wish that you were better" -Jim Rohn

 

herwrathmustbedragons.tumblr.com


#3 Kurai Tsubasa   Members   -  Reputation: 207

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 03:51 AM

Exercise 35 of what?

 

int(next) looks like it's casting the next variable as an int, but I can't be sure because I've never used python. I would suggest using your favorite internet-based search-engine to find out more. Also, I think if you're asking what your code does, you might want to consider going back a few exercises to make sure that you're fully understanding everything that you're coding. It's a lot easier to copy code than it is to write code.

 

A good strategy that I use whenever I learn a new concept (working on Ai right now), is to make one or two or three (however many you need to, really) programs that implement whatever you just learned. Maybe the second or third program can alter or expand on the original concept or use it for a different system or what-have-you--it's all about being able to apply what you've learned to novel situations (because rarely will life or programming present you with anything else).

Exercise 35 from learnpythonthehardway (i forget to write it ^^a)but thank you for your suggestionsmile.png 






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