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Zynga Pulls Plug on YoVille - Million$ in YoCash evaporate!

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#41 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 08:35 PM


There are people that can justify these purchases, as it provides entertainment/social value, not practical value.

 

I spend a lot of evenings on the phone with my bff in AZ as we play the game together.  My thought on spending money on the game is that if we lived closer and were spending that time in a restaurant having dinner and talking for hours, that would lead to dessert, and booze, and all the same socializing we do here.  That would cost me at minimum $20 to $50 to hang out with her for an evening and it would end up being high calorie and I'd have nothing to show for it.  So, instead, I hang out with her on the phone, in our little yo-houses, and spend $10 or so on some yocash for the evening, zero calories, we have a glass of wine while we play - much cheaper at home than out somewhere.  And we didn't even have to wear uncomfy shoes.  



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#42 Dream Cutter   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 200

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 09:09 PM

It was up for six years. SIX YEARS. It's not like they pulled the plug early. Besides, if it's such a success - why are they shutting it down? Why would anyone shut down something that generates income?

5+ years, and YoVille STILL generates new sources of income and new clients, daily.  Its been mismanaged and wasted - the publisher (not developer) has given up.  Perhaps.  Rumors suggest that Zynga is now in discussion and considering options with the original designer at Big Viking.  

 

Zynga updated its FAQ with these YovilleShutdown bullets:

http://www.zyngaplayersupport.com/article/yoville/YoVille-Shutdown-FAQs-en_US-1389005356507


Edited by Dream Cutter, 11 January 2014 - 09:30 PM.

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#43 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 09:28 PM


5+ years, and YoVille STILL generates new sources of income and new clients, daily.  Its been mismanaged and wasted - the publisher (not developer) has given up.  Perhaps.  Rumors suggest that Zynga is now in discussion and considering options with the original designer at Big Viking.  

 

We're hopeful.  I've never heard anyone say they left out of boredom.  It's all the broken issues in the game that have turned many off.  I agree, the game is a viable profit maker if it were repaired and maintained.  Zynga has definitely dropped the ball on maintenance on this game.  It's so sad.  



#44 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 09:50 PM

Another man's view........ 

 

This was released earlier today.  He's right.  We all agree.  



#45 Dream Cutter   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 200

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 10:00 PM

Another man's view........ 

 

This was released earlier today.  He's right.  We all agree.  

Yep, he pretty much states it.   Now how many games can you say there were there are 6 MILLION PASSIONATE AND VESTED PLAYER ACCOUNTS subscribed like this?

 

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.


Edited by Dream Cutter, 11 January 2014 - 10:01 PM.

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#46 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 10:41 PM

She's right too!  

 



#47 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14920

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:01 PM

Now how many games can you say there were there are 6 MILLION PASSIONATE AND VESTED PLAYER ACCOUNTS subscribed like this?

Several. Large numbers of players are common in free-to-play games (the monetization scheme that YoVille uses) is not uncommon, and in some games reach even higher than 6 million. The probably is, when you average out all the accounts together, the amount made from each account is relatively small. Maybe $2 or less a month, averaged out, per user. I'm guessing here, because the actual numbers aren't known. But you can't assume the amount you spend on it every month is the same that others spend.

"$2 * 6 million users = $12 million! That's a lot!", someone might say. Well, that's before employee wages, server maintenance, and the other costs; and before taxes and legal fees and accounting fees - try figuring out what nations, and states, and counties, you have to pay taxes to when your 6 million users are distributed all around the world.

Also, I can't find any recent subscriber numbers for YoVille. The 6 million number seems to be from 4 years ago... and the 4 years ago was when people saying the subscriber count has been dropping. How low it's dropped now, I haven't a clue.
 

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

How much does it cost Zynga per each user per month? How much does Zynga make off of each user (on average) per month?
The fact is, Zynga thinks it's more profitable for them to close YoVille then keep it running.

It costs real money to run a game. It costs in software maintenance, hardware maintenance, and human wages to maintain. If Zynga isn't willing to invest that money any longer, there's probably a reason.
It's most likely still profitable... but not very profitable for a company of Zynga's size.

It's a nice idea to say, "Why can't they just leave it up?". But that's like saying, "Why does Disneyland need 60,000 employees to run it? Why can't they just let it run itself?". Or, why doesn't NYC let its traffic run itself? Surely they can just let the traffic lights rotate at pre-programmed intervals without human intervention of 4500 employees!

Granted, YoVille is smaller than Disneyland and the New York street and subway networks, but it's still a complex interactive and dynamic system that doesn't run perfectly and needs alot of human intervention. Which costs money. And it needs periodic hardware replacements. Which costs money. When you add in the weird custom proprietary cloud architecture that YoVille is run off of, it's not something Zynga can just leave running without direct and constant human intervention.

YoVille still has plenty opportunity for profit it sounds like, but like any goldmine you still have to dig through stone to get to that gold - especially when the owner of the goldmine is selling it because they've already harvested the easier-to-retrieve gold.

YoVille getting bought out by the original developers would definitely be an ideal solution. Here's something the original developers need to consider: Zynga won't want to give away the game for free, because that would automatically create a competitor to Zynga. So the price will have to be high. Second, the original developer will then start off at a significant net loss for the game, and any "profit" for the first year or two would actually be getting them out of the negative amount of money they spent in purchasing the game.

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

The famous saying goes, "Not all that glitters is gold".
(On the flip-side, JRR Tolkien famously reversed it, basically saying that not all gold has to glitter).

Write emails to the head of the original developers, and tell them you'd subscribe if they bought the game, and rally the community to email the original developers as well. Or, move the community to a non-Zynga and community-owned forum.

Edited by Servant of the Lord, 11 January 2014 - 11:09 PM.

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#48 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3050

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:14 PM

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

Are you saying that Zynga of all things, doesn't knows how to recognize "gold" ?

 

Between your heavily emotional invested takes into the value of that game and Zynga's decision, I'd say Zynga is right in the money, because they're actually pretty good at that sort of stuff if you haven't noticed it.


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#49 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14920

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:16 PM

She's right too!

Her agreeing with your viewpoint does not mean she's right, it just means she agrees with your viewpoint. wink.png 
But her rhetorical question, "How difficult would it be to leave it open?" is the same as your view, and the previous person's view, but that doesn't mean it's correct. Truth isn't a democratic vote. It does cost money to keep things running. Clearly Zynga feels it's not worth it, but other developers could run things better and more cost-efficiently - maybe Big Viking Games could.


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#50 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:21 PM

"Also, I can't find any recent subscriber numbers for YoVille. The 6 million number seems to be from 4 years ago.."

 

I agree that current figures are probably nowhere near the 6 million mark by any stretch due to all the issues within the game in the past year.  However, there are still 6.5 million likes for the fan page on facebook which says that those who have quit, don't hate it enough to dislike it.  (until today's ploy within the forum to "unlike" the page)  

 

"How much does Zynga make off of each user (on average) per month?"

 

I couldn't begin to guess what, if anything, some people pay to play but I do know that all VIP memberships are $17.99 per month.  In addition to that, there are countless members who then buy additional yocash (myself included) that averaged another $30-100 per month when things were running good in the game.  That's the best way to get rich in yoville - you buy yocash and then deal it to the folks who don't buy it.  i.e. - you buy an item for 2 yocash, and then sell it in game for upwards of 40,000 coins.  So even those who don't pay to play, are still building Zynga's profit margin because those of us who are willing to buy the yocash, will deal it to them - there are always people willing to spend coins on yocash items.  Some of those items go for hundreds of thousands of coins per item.  Thus we buy more yocash to fill the demand, and that gets us the coins we need to buy other things in game that may have been discontinued and therefore cost millions of coins to acquire.  

 

The yo-rich probably got to their status by spending their real dollars and dealing the yocash at rates as high as 1 yc = 20,000-80,000 coins.  



#51 Dream Cutter   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 200

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:32 PM

 

Now how many games can you say there were there are 6 MILLION PASSIONATE AND VESTED PLAYER ACCOUNTS subscribed like this?

Several. Large numbers of players are common in free-to-play games (the monetization scheme that YoVille uses) is not uncommon, and in some games reach even higher than 6 million. The probably is, when you average out all the accounts together, the amount made from each account is relatively small. Maybe $2 or less a month, averaged out, per user. I'm guessing here, because the actual numbers aren't known. But you can't assume the amount you spend on it every month is the same that others spend.

"$2 * 6 million users = $12 million! That's a lot!", someone might say. Well, that's before employee wages, server maintenance, and the other costs; and before taxes and legal fees and accounting fees - try figuring out what nations, and states, and counties, you have to pay taxes to when your 6 million users are distributed all around the world.

Also, I can't find any recent subscriber numbers for YoVille. The 6 million number seems to be from 4 years ago... and the 4 years ago was when people saying the subscriber count has been dropping. How low it's dropped now, I haven't a clue.
 

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

How much does it cost Zynga per each user per month? How much does Zynga make off of each user (on average) per month?
The fact is, Zynga thinks it's more profitable for them to close YoVille then keep it running.

It costs real money to run a game. It costs in software maintenance, hardware maintenance, and human wages to maintain. If Zynga isn't willing to invest that money any longer, there's probably a reason.
It's most likely still profitable... but not very profitable for a company of Zynga's size.

It's a nice idea to say, "Why can't they just leave it up?". But that's like saying, "Why does Disneyland need 60,000 employees to run it? Why can't they just let it run itself?". Or, why doesn't NYC let its traffic run itself? Surely they can just let the traffic lights rotate at pre-programmed intervals without human intervention of 4500 employees!

Granted, YoVille is smaller than Disneyland and the New York street and subway networks, but it's still a complex interactive and dynamic system that doesn't run perfectly and needs alot of human intervention. Which costs money. And it needs periodic hardware replacements. Which costs money. When you add in the weird custom proprietary cloud architecture that YoVille is run off of, it's not something Zynga can just leave running without direct and constant human intervention.

YoVille still has plenty opportunity for profit it sounds like, but like any goldmine you still have to dig through stone to get to that gold - especially when the owner of the goldmine is selling it because they've already harvested the easier-to-retrieve gold.

YoVille getting bought out by the original developers would definitely be an ideal solution. Here's something the original developers need to consider: Zynga won't want to give away the game for free, because that would automatically create a competitor to Zynga. So the price will have to be high. Second, the original developer will then start off at a significant net loss for the game, and any "profit" for the first year or two would actually be getting them out of the negative amount of money they spent in purchasing the game.

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

The famous saying goes, "Not all that glitters is gold".
(On the flip-side, JRR Tolkien famously reversed it, basically saying that not all gold has to glitter).

Write emails to the head of the original developers, and tell them you'd subscribe if they bought the game, and rally the community to email the original developers as well. Or, move the community to a non-Zynga and community-owned forum.

 

Sure profitability has something about the decision, however I can assure you that a creative mind could figure a way to restructure the business to accommodate the consumers without insulting them, and eliminating their digital creations and asset purchases.  They are destroying the consumer confidence in this type of business model.  Whats next, Amazon Instant Video decides its not profitable to stay on line - and lock out millions of users from their digital acquisitions.  Regardless of TOS, the backlash of such action would be devastating to the online distribution and service industry.  This will be a bell-weather.  It was not long ago that Zynga games represented the majority of FaceBook's revenue, and with 6 million registered users, Yoville's contribution is not an insubstantial share.  

Many program managers and entrepreneurs would jump at the offer to tame the beast. She may be unwieldy, however she is a proven winner and I am shocked there is no Yoville2 in plans.  Its more than can be said about most business opportunities.

 

About finding gold... I have been somewhat successful with my own determination and limited patience in finding gold, and here is the best advice I ever received by one of the most respected Death Valley Prospectors.   http://goldpeeps.com/gp_features_cms.html


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#52 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:41 PM

 

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

Are you saying that Zynga of all things, doesn't knows how to recognize "gold" ?

 

Between your heavily emotional invested takes into the value of that game and Zynga's decision, I'd say Zynga is right in the money, because they're actually pretty good at that sort of stuff if you haven't noticed it.

 

 

I would say that Zynga probably doesn't realize that in all their moving things around, and all their personel changes, that they are indeed ignoring a potential cash cow.  They have moved the office out of the country and that has changed the quality of customer service we get on any level.  Management has changed several times over the past years since the inception of the game, and as we all know, they've faced multiple lawsuits regarding shady business dealings in that time as well.  Obviously the poker games are their biggest money maker, and the rest be damned.... at least that's how it feels over here in Yoville.  

 

Throughout the years, Zynga has proven to us repeatedly that as consumers, our interests are unimportant to them.  For example - one year they got an idea to change that factory to a sweets factory.  They rolled it out to a select few on a trial basis.  The results were Horrible!!!  There were votes taken  through one of those sites where you can see the tally.  The Sweets Factory lost by a landslide, yet they then implemented it into the entire game, and that's when we lost the majority of those who are gone now.  You lost money every time it was time to clock in because the ovens burned whatever mess you were trying to make a coin with.... it was dreadful.  There were protests, and CNN even aired a segment about all the hoopla.  The forum was ablaze with complaints and instead of hearing us out, or even reading the threads, they deleted them and banned the posters from the forums for up to 3 days.  Finally, months later, they caved and put it back to its original form.  

 

This is typical of the way this game has been abused by Zynga.  Another time there was a poll - again they posted a link to an info gathering site where we had choices of what features we would like to see come to the game.  There was an overwhelming vote for a closet.  Someplace we could just put our clothes so we didn't have that much inventory on our avatar at one time (extra inventory slows the avatar down and was causing lag issues).  All these years later, we still have no closet..,...  

 

If the Yoville staff was actually customer oriented, and listened, this game would have 10 million players by now without question.  



#53 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1089

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:09 AM

@LoriJ

 

 That is typical behavior of a company that has gone "corporate" ... a change that occurs when they restructure from a small game company, to a large one.


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#54 Dream Cutter   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 200

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:14 AM

 

Some folks cant see gold if they trip over it.

Are you saying that Zynga of all things, doesn't knows how to recognize "gold" ?

 

Between your heavily emotional invested takes into the value of that game and Zynga's decision, I'd say Zynga is right in the money, because they're actually pretty good at that sort of stuff if you haven't noticed it.

 

Would this be the equivalent of fools gold?  :

 

"Bitcoin Tops $1,000 as Zynga Tests Virtual Money

By Fani Kelesidou  
January 7, 2014 
It didn't take long for Bitcoin, the stateless currency that has economists and technophiles at loggerheads, to break through the $1,000 barrier for the second time. Following a 50% crash in December, Bitcoin's value is again on the rise thanks to Zynga (NASDAQ: ZNGA  ) . The social gaming company decided to start testing the virtual currency for seven of its online games, fueling a price run-up and causing Bitcoin evangelists to smirk.
 
Should we whoop it up or keep calm and wait for the next crash?"
---------------------------
Where did the capitol resources go?
 
Zynga's CEO To Cash Out 16% of Stock
 
Updated March 23, 2012 5:53 p.m. ET
Zynga Inc. ZNGA -0.24%  Chief Executive Mark Pincus is cashing out about 15.5% of his holdings as part of a larger secondary offering from insiders.
The sale of 43 million Class A shares by various holders will sharply increase the social-gaming company's public float.
Zynga won't receive any proceeds from the offering, which it initially filed plans for last week without disclosing the number of shares to be offered. After the offering, it will have 164.4 million Class A shares outstanding.
 
But wait there is more...
 
In April, Zynga conducted a "secondary stock offering" in which insiders dumped 43 million shares of stock at $12 a share, raking in about $516 million.
Yesterday, four months later, Zynga reported a horrible quarter, and the stock plunged to $3.
In other words, Zynga insiders cashed out at exactly the right time.In fact, they cashed out in the same quarter in which Zynga imploded.
 
The quarter had already begun when Zynga insiders shoveled their stock out the door.By the time the quarter ended, Zynga's business (and stock price) was in the tank.
 
Zynga's April stock offering was managed by Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, and other premiere Wall Street underwriters. All of the stock sold in the offering was sold by Zynga insiders. None of the cash raised in the offering went to the company. The Zynga underwriters were paid ~$15 million of fees to arrange this cash-out. Zynga, the company, also paid $1 million in expenses to facilitate the cash-out (legal fees, private jet rental, etc.)
And, thanks to the offering, the Zynga insiders took $516 million off the table just before the stock crashed.
 
Which Zynga insiders took advantage of this brilliantly timed sale?
How much did they make? Here are some of the selling shareholders:
 
Marc Pincus, Zynga's CEO, sold 16.5 million shares for $200 million
Institutional Venture Partners, a Zynga investor, sold 5.8 million shares for $70 million
Union Square Ventures, a Zynga investor, sold 5.2 million shares for $62 million
Google, a Zynga investor, sold 4 million shares for $48 million
Silver Lake Partners, a Zynga investor, sold 4 million shares for $48 million
Reid Hoffman, a Zynga investor, sold 688,000 shares for $8.2 million
David Wehner, Zynga's CFO, sold 386,000 shares for $4.6 million
John Schappert, Zynga's COO, sold 322,000 shares for $3.9 million
Reginald Davis, Zynga's general counsel, sold 315,000 shares for $3.8 million
And so on ...
Now ...
 
I know many of these folks personally, including at the company's underwriters, and like and respect them.  I think the last thing they would intentionally do is unload stock when they thought it was about to crash—especially when the amount they made in the sale, though huge, is still relative chicken feed for them.
Also, all of these folks only sold a fraction of their holdings, so they've been hammered along with the rest of Zynga shareholders by the subsequent collapse.
I also know from personal experience (unfortunately) just how quickly things that seem to be going well can fall apart.
 
But, all that said, wow.
In three months—based on what happened in the same quarter in which these folks sold—Zynga's business deteriorated so rapidly that Zynga went from a $12 stock to a $3 stock. That just doesn't look very good."

--------------------------------------

So whats the plan fix, what happens to the game developers?  GAMBLING, literally this time.  Zynga has gone into the on-line casino business. Whether its a case of chasing a greater gold streak, or desperate measures, ts seems to be fact that management has a poor track record to its investors, employees, and now consumers.  What was left was to exploit only more vulnerable consumers...gamblers.

 

Hemorrhaging was slowed by eliminating resource intensive games and lay off most of the designers, as gambling cash cows dont require the same level of creativity and development support. 

 

Here is the blow by blow detail from, you guessed it, a competing casino's wire service:

 

 http://www.pechanga.net/category/issue-tag/zynga

 

So if that venture flops, there is always internet porn to explore in 2014. Creative minds can find a way to dig deeper!


Edited by Dream Cutter, 12 January 2014 - 12:44 AM.

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#55 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:21 AM


In three months—based on what happened in the same quarter in which these folks sold—Zynga's business deteriorated so rapidly that Zynga went from a $12 stock to a $3 stock.
 
That just doesn't look very go
od."

 

If they ignore the customer on their other games as much as they have in Yoville, it's not surprising.  (though I question the timing on the stock dumps, but I'm a little jaded right now)  



#56 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14920

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:40 AM

Sure profitability has something about the decision, however I can assure you that a creative mind could figure a way to restructure the business

You don't need to assure me, I already mentioned that same thing. But It's less of an issue of creativity, so much as flexibility that most larger companies lack.
 

They are destroying the consumer confidence in this type of business model.

This (free-to-play) business model was designed from ground-up to exploit consumers. Destroying your confidence in a model that was designed to take advantage of you is probably a good thing.

(Note: Not all free-to-play games are bad and exploitive but many of them are, and the business model has developed around the exploitation more than not)
 

Whats next, Amazon Instant Video decides its not profitable to stay on line - and lock out millions of users from their digital acquisitions.

Why not? It's happened before. Virtual worlds have shut down, and the digital "property" disappeared without even puffs of smoke. Plenty of consumer annoyance... but the business world, and eventually the consumers, moved on.
 

Regardless of TOS, the backlash of such action would be devastating to the online distribution and service industry.

Citation needed? The past thirty years of internet history suggests otherwise.

We have gut feelings about what should happen in a just and fair world, relying on the basic good tendencies of the average human beings. But hey, the selfishness of the average human being outweighs their good tendencies a hundred times over - it's just well hidden. When push comes to shove, decisions get made that leave people lying in the dust while others make a quick buck.
 

It was not long ago that Zynga games represented the majority of FaceBook's revenue, and with 6 million registered users, Yoville's contribution is not an insubstantial share.

That's a four-year old 'ostensibly' 6 million.

 

According to Wikipedia, Zynga has 240 million monthly active users over all their games.
 

Many program managers and entrepreneurs would jump at the offer to tame the beast. She may be unwieldy, however she is a proven winner and I am shocked there is no Yoville2 in plans.  Its more than can be said about most business opportunities.

You're speaking from the perspective of an emotionally-invested fan. Many program managers and entrepreneurs would jump at the offer, if the game was given to them for free, sure. But how many are wanting to spend several million for the "opportunity" to tame a "beast" that they've never met in person and that they don't have full info on?
There are thousands of people who joined the California gold rush. Most didn't become wealthy. Aside from the few who won the geological lottery, the real winners were those providing services and selling equipment to the miners.
 

About finding gold... I have been somewhat successful with my own determination and limited patience in finding gold, and here is the best advice I ever received by one of the most respected Death Valley Prospectors.   http://goldpeeps.com/gp_features_cms.html

I fully agree: "gold is a devilish thing". So important, he mentioned it twice.

Zynga is a big company looking for big gold veins, but smaller more flexible studios can definitely profit from an already-mined mine. But it's not free money: it does require work; it does require up-front investment of time, money, and labor; and it's not a guaranteed success even when all is said and done.

 

And because it requires corporate flexibility that those big companies almost always lack, that's why it doesn't make sense for Zynga to keep running it, even if it might make sense for another company to buy and run it.

 

Zynga is required by law to look after it's shareholders. It can't do charity for the sake of charity, unless it benefits shareholders, because our government forbids it.

Note: Companies can do charitable things... but only if it benefits the company's shareholders in the long run.

 

It's not that you seeing something that everyone else is magically blind to; it's actually that you're seeing only a part of the whole picture, and there are more that goes into these decisions than you'd think. It's not a clear-cut, "Hey, they're leaving nuggets of gold on the ground!". We're talking about greed-filled humans (just like all of us) running a business that is required by the government, by law, to make money for the shareholders above everything else. If they leave nuggets on the ground, it's either fool's gold, or they see more profit elsewhere and don't want to waste the effort.

 

Question: When is it a good idea to hire a plumber for $250 to fix your leaky sink if you know how to fix it yourself in only an hour?

Answer: When you can make more than $250 an hour, it'd be better to devote your hour to earning the money, and paying the plumber. Any money you earn over the plumber's fee (over the $250) is profit. By not hiring the plumber, you lose money - or at least the potential money that could've otherwise been earned.

 

Question: When is it a good idea to close a social game making you $2 ARPU (average revenue per user) per month, with (ostensibly) 6 million subscribers?

Answer: When you think can take the exact same resources you are devoting to running that game, and redirect those some resources to something more profitable.

 

I'm not saying what Zynga did was correct, I'm just answering the shocked, "Why?" question that everyone keeps repeating. Why? Because Zynga feels there is more profit in (Zynga) closing the game, then in (Zynga) running it. Full stop.

And if that is what Zynga thinks, then Zynga is required, by law, to do so. Full stop.


Edited by Servant of the Lord, 12 January 2014 - 01:04 AM.

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#57 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:50 AM


Zynga is a big company looking for big gold viens,

 

So much so that they've forgotten where they came from......... 

 

As a businesswoman and accountant, I don't see the profitability in researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing a product that you intend to destroy within a few years just so you can do it all again........ that seems counter productive to me.

 

Maybe it's just different in the gaming industry, but I've always lived by the principle that it costs more to get a customer than it does to keep one.  



#58 Dream Cutter   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 200

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 01:08 AM

If an international company on the scale of Amazon Instant Video or iTunes performed this, it would have a revolt. Its key to note that the are many digital assets (licensed, Ik) purchased with cash, YoCash in game tender purchased with cash, and coin awarded via award/prize in YoVille. Its a full economy. Furthermore derivative creations were developed by consumers that created from procured items into scenes and extensive works of art. Many examples of artistic full page scenes made creatively by artists arranging digital assets. The resulting merged JPG making the on screen image is truly unique.

Also third party businesses and micro-business in and out of game economy popped up.  The amount of user creativity applied to the YoVille foundation is what transformed it into special place that made social interaction enchanting and enabling. You always want to show off how you applied the latest release.  Crime and hacking also lurks there too because of the open ended nature, however those who played understood the risks. Many were burned, but came back - it was that good,  

 

Why am I vested?  Probably not what you would guess.  I have played Yoville and do jump on in special occasions however my time on any game is very limited.  I am not a stock holder, or anyone with a secondary vested business... I have some hobby game sites and innovations.  I make machine tools.  I have hobby game and websites because I'm a 3d enthusiast that was inspired by a  Poser user... another story..  

I have a vested interest in the special people that visit Yoville daily.  The shut ins, the invalids, the socially awkward, the introverted, the disfigured, the peeps that think they are too ugly for real world interaction and all the people that do not care about physical attributes.  For all the YoVillians - That Care For Each Other.  You see for them, YoVille is the great leveler.  We're all silly toons in Yoville.  Not some shiny barbie wannabe, or studly dude at the beach - and also not the hermit that forgot to shave for the last week.  Understanding that may give you an understanding why 2nd life or EverQuest and such would not fulfill.  

 

Ok...It's for my Wife.  There I said it - and all her best friends are there, obscure and happy in YoVille.


Edited by Dream Cutter, 12 January 2014 - 01:16 AM.

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#59 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1089

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 01:16 AM

Just a note:

1: Zynga has been loosing money for some time now on their operations

2: From what I have been reading, in a free to play social game like Yoville, less than 5% of the players actually pay into the game


Edited by Shippou, 12 January 2014 - 01:17 AM.

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#60 LoriJ   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 01:21 AM

I have no statistics to dispute the 5% you're talking about.  But I do know that the yo-conomy is based on those who either buy yocash, or sell yocash items in game (therefore buying more yocash) because all the best stuff is yocash of course.  I would think that the amount purchased by the ones buying the yocash, would subsequently offset the number of free players based on the fact that as yocash dealers, we buy substantially more yocash than we would if we were only buying for personal use.  

 

Of course, I have no actual facts or figures to base that on other than the idea that the yo-conomy is definitely a very diverse group with varying economic stature as in real life.  







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