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Good Direct3D 11 book for someone who already knows OpenGL


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#1 Lazy Foo   Members   -  Reputation: 1105

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 03:06 PM

So I usually try to keep things cross platform by using OpenGL and other non-proprietary libraries, but my current job has me poking around in a lot of DirectX code.While there's quite a few similarities and I was able to be productive relatively quickly, I would like something that gives me an overview of how the API works.

 

So I am looking for a book that's good for someone who uses primarily UNIX and cross platform APIs and wants to start working with Win32/DirectX11.


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#2 imoogiBG   Members   -  Reputation: 1156

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 06:12 PM

I suggest you to download the DXSDK June2010 and read the samples(or search them online), MSDN.



#3 ericrrichards22   Members   -  Reputation: 766

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 06:33 PM

Frank Luna's DX 11 book is always good.

I've also found some material from this book to be useful.  I don't own it, but some very useful information came up on the Google Books preview, so I am thinking about getting it.


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#4 MJP   Moderators   -  Reputation: 11038

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 02:02 AM

I haven't read any of the Frank Luna books personally, but they're recommended quite frequently around here so I'd imagine that they're good. The book that I worked on with Jason Zink (Practical Computation and Rendering with Direct3D 11) dedicates a large portion of the text to giving a thorough overview of the D3D API and it's logical rendering pipeline, and is primarily aimed at people with programming and C++ experience that want to learn the API. So it may be suitable for your purposes.



#5 newtechnology   Members   -  Reputation: 711

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:25 AM

I would vote for Frank luna's book because it is a very good book and I personally own it. I'd give it 5 stars.


Edited by newtechnology, 12 January 2014 - 03:26 AM.


#6 imoogiBG   Members   -  Reputation: 1156

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 04:37 AM

Frank de Luna's books are great if you are new to graphics programming.

But Lazy Foo says that he got experience with OGL.

He will be bored reading again and again about what is vertex/index buffer and so on... It is a waste of money for something you've already known.


Edited by imoogiBG, 12 January 2014 - 04:38 AM.


#7 newtechnology   Members   -  Reputation: 711

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 07:14 AM

Frank de Luna's books are great if you are new to graphics programming.

But Lazy Foo says that he got experience with OGL.

He will be bored reading again and again about what is vertex/index buffer and so on... It is a waste of money for something you've already known. 

 

 
Taken from book:
 
 
INTENDED AUDIENCE
This book was designed with the following three audiences in mind:
1. Intermediate level C++ programmers who would like an introduction to 3D programming using the latest iteration of Direct3D.
2. 3D programmers experienced with an API other than DirectX (e.g., OpenGL) who would like an introduction to Direct3D 11.
3. Experienced Direct3D 9 and Direct3D 11 programmers wishing to learn the latest iteration of Direct3D.


#8 imoogiBG   Members   -  Reputation: 1156

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 10:30 AM

 

Frank de Luna's books are great if you are new to graphics programming.

But Lazy Foo says that he got experience with OGL.

He will be bored reading again and again about what is vertex/index buffer and so on... It is a waste of money for something you've already known. 

 

 
Taken from book:
 
 
INTENDED AUDIENCE
This book was designed with the following three audiences in mind:
1. Intermediate level C++ programmers who would like an introduction to 3D programming using the latest iteration of Direct3D.
2. 3D programmers experienced with an API other than DirectX (e.g., OpenGL) who would like an introduction to Direct3D 11.
3. Experienced Direct3D 9 and Direct3D 11 programmers wishing to learn the latest iteration of Direct3D.

 

 

Im not gonna flame or something. This sentence is there for 'marketing' purposes. The publisher wants to sell as many books as possible.



#9 mhagain   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7866

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:21 PM

I suggest you to download the DXSDK June2010 and read the samples(or search them online), MSDN.

 

I honestly wouldn't support this suggestion.  The documentation in that SDK is incredibly poor, and you'll often need to refer back to the D3D10 versions of several API calls as the D3D11 stuff appears to have been written with the assumption that you already know 10.  The help file index in incomplete, important structs or enums aren't indexed at all (or aren't linked from the help pages for API calls that use them) meaning that you end up using the search a lot.  The samples themselves use DXUT which abstracts away of lot of the important things you need to know for your window management code.


It appears that the gentleman thought C++ was extremely difficult and he was overjoyed that the machine was absorbing it; he understood that good C++ is difficult but the best C++ is well-nigh unintelligible.


#10 Icebone1000   Members   -  Reputation: 1062

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:06 PM

Practical Computation and Rendering with Direct3D 11 is better than the sdk at explaining every stuff d3d have, at GREAT detail, I recommend using it as a manual. (it also explains advance techniques)



#11 TheOrestes   Members   -  Reputation: 268

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 10:35 PM

Completely agree with Icebone1000, Practical Rendering and Computation with Direct3D 11 is a great book. Tons of details & great explanation.



#12 Buckeye   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4588

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 12:52 PM

A problem with Luna's Direct3d 11 book is getting the samples to compile and run without a lot of problems. The book itself appears to be pretty good, but you'll have to create your own projects, perhaps copying code from the downloaded samples. I finally gave up since I couldn't get past the samples for Chapter 4 without spending an hour or more on each sample, searching for the reasons for compile/run errors, just, for instance, to display a static vertex shaded cube.

 

Note: some of the problems aren't (directly) Luna's fault. Microsoft made some (later) changes which screwed things up. E.g., Luna used VS2005 for the samples. Later versions of VS don't like his setup. Some of the fixes for problems are addressed in various places, but you'll have to spend some time searching around for those fixes. However, Luna's fault or not, having to create your own projects because Luna's won't compile/run is a pain and makes actually learning DX11 a side issue rather than the purpose of the exercise.

 

Also, getting help with his book/samples is problematic. The d3dcoder.net forums are pretty inactive and most of the posts are now spam (selling houses, kitchens, etc.) I'm not even sure there are any moderators for the forums anymore. It's a shame, 'cuz Luna's DX9 book(s) and samples are excellent.


Please don't PM me with questions. Post them in the forums for everyone's benefit, and I can embarrass myself publicly.


#13 Jason Z   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4911

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 09:38 PM

I would agree with MJP about our book - it sounds like it is directed at your demographic (experienced developer, knows graphics already...).  You can take a look at the code for the samples, which is provided along with the rendering framework on the Hieroglyph 3 codeplex page under the MIT license.  That will give you a flavor of the samples and the quality level of the software.

 

You can also take a look on Google or Amazon to see a sampling of the pages.  Roughly half of the book is about the API (resources, pipeline, compute, tessellation, multithreaded rendering) and the rest is dedicated to sample algorithms.  I think it will help you get started.






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