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Purchasing a Tegra 4


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#1 Vincent_M   Members   -  Reputation: 744

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:49 PM

I wasn't sure where to put this topic, but it is OpenGL-motivated...

 

With the advances of today's mobile SoCs, I'd like to develop a low-cost arcade cabinet. The Tegra 4's looks like it provides all the system resources I would ever need, and I'd like to install a low-end Linux distro on it (like Arch Linux, or something of the sort). The problem is, I don't see any place on NVIDIA's website where I could order just the SoC. Would I have to make some sort of mass-production contract like device manufacturers, such as Asus or Samsung, to get ahold of these chips? Are hobbyists unable to purchase these?



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#2 richardurich   Members   -  Reputation: 1187

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:02 PM

The SoC wouldn't do a lot for you, so I don't think you're looking to buy just the chip. It wouldn't have a motherboard or anything.

 

I'm guessing you want a development board. nVidia might make or sell some models, but it looks like they mainly partner with others to manufacture them. If you're planning to develop quite a few low-cost arcade cabinets as a business or something, definitely talk to the different players and tell them what your needs are. If this is just a one-off, you're probably better to go with something aimed at consumers. I'm not sure if the Linux on a stick products would work, but they have options under $100 for a fully functional system.



#3 Ravyne   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 8155

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:24 PM

You'd need to design, or have designed, an application-specific motherboard for it -- the kinds of higher-end SOCs you find in phones and tablets, like Tegra chips, are sufficiently complex that a hobbyist has no hope of designing such a board. If you're not doing it professionally already, DIY is not an option.

 

However, if you had the motherboard sorted, you'd source your parts from somewhere like Digikey (for prototyping / low-count production) or direct from the manufacturer for high-volume products. Sometimes SOC designers offer samples for prototyping purposes, but you usually have to be an established relationship with the capacity to deliver on your designs.

 

For chips that are less complex -- simpler ARM-based microcontrollers -- those kinds of designs are within the reach of a dedicated hobbyist to design and have produced, but those will generally be far less capable devices.

 

If you look around, you can find pre-built evaluation and prototyping boards that offer chips of various capability, from very small to very large (comparable to Tegra3/4, possibly even Tegra4-based boards). You could in theory develop a design around one of these boards, the trick is finding one that offers the interfaces you need, and then developing the software and outside hardware interfaces necessary. If the protype was successful, you can order a batch of boards for limited-production, or for high-volume production, work with someone to adapt the boards reference design to your needs and reduce cost by eliminating unused features.

 

Another option would be to base the machine on a low-cost commodity platform like an ITX PC motheboard and an inexpensive, low-power x86 processor, either with integrated or discrete graphics. There are likewise commercially-available peripherals for interfacing standard JAMMA arcade cabinets from commodity PCs. PC processors with integrated graphics get looked down on, and aren't as sexy as saying "Tegra4 inside", but even Intel's latest integrated GPU is far more capable than Tegra4. AMD's brand-new-as-of-today Kabini APUs are even more capable.



#4 martyj2009   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 09:53 PM

I'd recommend running a micro atx motherboard with a AMD APU. This way it can run regular PC games.



#5 Chris_F   Members   -  Reputation: 2461

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:23 AM

Embedded hardware for a arcade cabinet seems a bit odd. Arcade cabinets traditionally contained very high end (for their time) computer hardware. The equivalent today would probably be a desktop computer with quad-SLI GTX Titan in it. If you are going for inexpensive and low spec then something like an AMD APU would probably make way more sense that a SoC that is intended for tablets.


Edited by Chris_F, 15 January 2014 - 12:24 AM.


#6 Vincent_M   Members   -  Reputation: 744

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:27 AM

This confirms my predictions. I'm starting to think that buying a $300 USD computer that only has onboard graphics would be a good way to go. I'm not looking for a powerhouse computer to develop my arcade games on --just something that could process 2D graphics in HD well enough. Memory also seems really easy to come by as just about every configuration comes with +4GB. Not sure if HD has access to any sort of virtual memory, but what I get will probably be way more than I'll ever need, lol.

 

I wouldn't go too far with something like the Titan. I think decent-quality graphical hardware is pretty cheap nowadays. As much as I like to develop graphics code, I will want to focus more on fun, casual gameplay and party games. Indie developers on mobile platforms and Nintendo seem to be doing well with these strategies. Well, the 3DS is. I think the Wii U has a shot at making a comeback now that I have a PS4, and don't play it because there aren't any games for it.


Edited by Vincent_M, 15 January 2014 - 12:11 PM.


#7 Ravyne   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 8155

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:33 PM

I really can't recommend AMD's new kabini Kaviri APUs enough for your use case. A suitable motherboard ($50-$80), processor, ($120-$170), 8GB DDR3-2133 ($80), a small SSD 32-64GB ($50-$75), and a good quality 300W PSU($30) is a good hardware platform that falls into the $300-$400 range.

 

The new APUs run well enough with the closed-source AMD drivers under linux with a bit of fiddling, but that will get better soon enough. There's also support for the TrueAudio DSP for advanced audio processing, and (soon) for AMD's Mantle API which is a more console-like programming paradigm that frees up a lot of CPU overhead compared to Direct3D or OpenGL, and letting you get a bit more out of the GPU itself more easily.



#8 Joshhua5   Members   -  Reputation: 471

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 09:40 AM

This could be perfect http://www.raspberrypi.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_Pi

  • Low power, high performance OpenGL-ES® 1.1/2.0 VideoCore GPU. 1 Gigapixel per second fill rate.

Edited by Joshhua5, 16 January 2014 - 09:41 AM.





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