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Time expectance for a new programmer to learn a new codebase in industry


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#1 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1411

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:04 PM

I was looking at a job ad from high5games and saw the information below:

 

Candidates must be capable of picking up & running with a preexisting architecture, as well as extending that architecture with totally new features.

 

Do game companies and non gaming companies give the same amount of time to their new programmer onboard on their team?



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#2 SeanMiddleditch   Members   -  Reputation: 5333

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:20 PM

Good companies surely will.  Nobody is going to expect a new programmer (especially a junior programmer) to be effective on the first day.  Ramp up time is built in to the expectations for any new hire in any position for any company.



#3 ApochPiQ   Moderators   -  Reputation: 15190

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:32 AM

It's worth noting that having the skills to understand and work with existing code is very valuable as a junior candidate. Many hopefuls come out of school with no clue how to work on someone else's code, let alone how to read and comprehend a large body of (likely legacy) code. Ramp-up time is expected for everyone, but you'll be better off if you can keep that time as short as possible.

For senior-level positions, in games or anywhere else in software, you should expect to get a few days to study the code and maybe a few weeks to learn all the relevant portions that pertain to your job. You will also be expected to do this without having your hand held the entire time.

Junior positions might give you around twice as much time, give or take. But again, if you can do this learning process quickly - and without being a time drain on more senior staff - you will be much better off.

#4 fir   Members   -  Reputation: -456

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 05:20 AM

Almost every work in programming is like that (and i think usually it take more than few weeks to get oriented in the codebase, there are people whou could for example get external library/engine source and just write addings in it (rewrite it etc) and other who are far not ready for this)

 

But if you are newbie (I am myself are moderate experienced only) In work you usually meet a friendly fellows to talk with them (drinking some drinks (coffe/beer/wine/vodka) with them ;-)  they will be helping you, and if you are experienced you shoul help (explain things) to them too


Edited by fir, 19 January 2014 - 05:23 AM.


#5 warnexus   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1411

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:47 AM

Thanks for the heads-up, everyone! Great points to keep in mind about it. =]



#6 Counteractman   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:04 AM

Yep, training time is needed.  Especially, coordinating with a new group. If one is in a good collective the job will be warm and welcoming.  If however, one is in a mill house situation(very legacy way of doing things) then a lot of time is wasted estabilishing good arguments before anything is done--not a very good scenario :(.

 

It's pretty much a two way street.  You have to be brought up to speed and be able to keep up with production goals. Especially, when it's not your money!  Which can lead to a lot of tension if the project goes awry.



#7 crancran   Members   -  Reputation: 406

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 11:50 AM

There is a ramp up period for any new hire programmer, regardless of your expertise level; however, expectations are generally set based on your past work experience, what you claim to know and bring to the table day 1 and the complexity of the code base you're going to be working on and your role/position requirements within the team.  Just be expected to show self initiative, be willing to dig and understand on your own but never hesitate to ask should you feel you've spent adequate time studying something but it doesn't click. Willingness to try and learn go a long way in the software industry, gaming or otherwise.


Edited by crancran, 21 January 2014 - 11:51 AM.


#8 fir   Members   -  Reputation: -456

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 01:29 PM

There is a ramp up period for any new hire programmer, regardless of your expertise level; however, expectations are generally set based on your past work experience, what you claim to know and bring to the table day 1 and the complexity of the code base you're going to be working on and your role/position requirements within the team.  Just be expected to show self initiative, be willing to dig and understand on your own but never hesitate to ask should you feel you've spent adequate time studying something but it doesn't click. Willingness to try and learn go a long way in the software industry, gaming or otherwise.

 

 

i think there are two schools:

- one is to consult sometimes, work and not talk to much 

- second it ta talk almost everytime, share much opinions not only about the used language, codebase but even on the life questions. movies etc

 

I belong to the later, not only programming fellow is adequate to that, but some do and for me the second way of working (when i got some close fellows to talk with == good workplace, this is just much more fun; and the first is almost == bad workplace when i am more tired and sad






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