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Sword Art Online technologically possible?


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#1 3DModelerMan   Members   -  Reputation: 935

Posted 25 January 2014 - 12:00 PM

I was thinking about uses for the Oculus Rift the other day, and Sword Art Online is obviously one of the first things that popped into my head. And then it got me thinking: just how far away is technology from being able to produce something like SAO? Graphics are pretty much solved already. Powerful enough gaming PCs can pump out 4k 60fps graphics now, so basically anything should be possible graphics wise when we've got that much power already. The closest that I know of that is possible to build now would be the Omni treadmill and an Oculus rift with a Kinect and/or maybe an eMotive headset type of thing. I also saw that the University of Washington did an experiment where one person was actually able to move another's arm to play a game halfway across the campus. What do you guys think? Any technological advancements recently that you think could eventually lead to a holodeck at some point if they were integrated correctly?



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#2 jjd   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2066

Posted 25 January 2014 - 01:06 PM

I was thinking about uses for the Oculus Rift the other day, and Sword Art Online is obviously one of the first things that popped into my head. And then it got me thinking: just how far away is technology from being able to produce something like SAO? Graphics are pretty much solved already. Powerful enough gaming PCs can pump out 4k 60fps graphics now, so basically anything should be possible graphics wise when we've got that much power already. The closest that I know of that is possible to build now would be the Omni treadmill and an Oculus rift with a Kinect and/or maybe an eMotive headset type of thing. I also saw that the University of Washington did an experiment where one person was actually able to move another's arm to play a game halfway across the campus. What do you guys think? Any technological advancements recently that you think could eventually lead to a holodeck at some point if they were integrated correctly?

 

The technology for creating virtual realities has been around in one form or another for a while. However, I think the critical missing piece is integrating haptic feedback. You can have all of those devices creating visually amazing environments but when it comes to something like fencing or similar you are still going to have people flailing around rapidly it the same way they do with wii. For me, the oculus rift is cool but not enough to create a compelling virtual reality. If you can combine that with physical feedback that makes me feel like I am swinging a sword you have the next paradigm shifting change in game development.

 

-Josh


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#3 3DModelerMan   Members   -  Reputation: 935

Posted 25 January 2014 - 01:11 PM

Yeah, that's the thing I always felt like was missing when playing Skyward Sword: weight. It feels NOTHING like a real weapon to play with a Wii Remote. And even if you were to make it heavier, the balance would still be wrong for a sword. And you would need different weights for battle axes, spears, and daggers too. A shooter would probably be easier because you could mod an airsoft gun into a controller and add some sort of simulated kickback.



#4 ddn3   Members   -  Reputation: 1248

Posted 25 January 2014 - 08:52 PM

The VR part can be done no prob, it's the full body feedback which will be a problem and even that is not impossible. Just how much money do you want to throw at the problem? A full body suit with actuator feedback to simulate impact and resistance from a virtual foe can be done, I'm certain of it, but will cost millions to build such a suit.I suspect DARPA or some of the larger universities are already working on such tech.



#5 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3192

Posted 25 January 2014 - 08:59 PM

The VR part can be done no prob, it's the full body feedback which will be a problem and even that is not impossible. Just how much money do you want to throw at the problem? A full body suit with actuator feedback to simulate impact and resistance from a virtual foe can be done, I'm certain of it, but will cost millions to build such a suit.I suspect DARPA or some of the larger universities are already working on such tech.


why bother with building a full suit, if you can toss millions at the problem, seems like it'd be overall simplier/more immensive to create a device which is placed at the base of the neck/spine, and can simulate those effects directly.

Edited by slicer4ever, 25 January 2014 - 08:59 PM.

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#6 ddn3   Members   -  Reputation: 1248

Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:40 PM

 

The VR part can be done no prob, it's the full body feedback which will be a problem and even that is not impossible. Just how much money do you want to throw at the problem? A full body suit with actuator feedback to simulate impact and resistance from a virtual foe can be done, I'm certain of it, but will cost millions to build such a suit.I suspect DARPA or some of the larger universities are already working on such tech.


why bother with building a full suit, if you can toss millions at the problem, seems like it'd be overall simplier/more immensive to create a device which is placed at the base of the neck/spine, and can simulate those effects directly.

 

Because i doubt there would be a market for people electing to have major brain surgery just so they can play an online sword game, however having a suit u can take off and put on is more useful / convenient  for most people, but if u go far enough in the future sure cybernetic technology would allow u direct brain interfaces but thats not a realistic possibility in the near future.



#7 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3192

Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:44 PM

The VR part can be done no prob, it's the full body feedback which will be a problem and even that is not impossible. Just how much money do you want to throw at the problem? A full body suit with actuator feedback to simulate impact and resistance from a virtual foe can be done, I'm certain of it, but will cost millions to build such a suit.I suspect DARPA or some of the larger universities are already working on such tech.


why bother with building a full suit, if you can toss millions at the problem, seems like it'd be overall simplier/more immensive to create a device which is placed at the base of the neck/spine, and can simulate those effects directly.

Because i doubt there would be a market for people electing to have major brain surgery just so they can play an online sword game, however having a suit u can take off and put on is more useful / convenient  for most people, but if u go far enough in the future sure cybernetic technology would allow u direct brain interfaces but thats not a realistic possibility in the near future.


well, i'd hope the device woudn't be so limited as to a single game immension. nor was i thinking it'd be to the extent of having major brain surgery(although that might be realistically the only way to append such an augmentation). personally i don't think the idea of direct brain interface devices are so far into the future, maybe a few decades.
Check out https://www.facebook.com/LiquidGames for some great games made by me on the Playstation Mobile market.

#8 Erik Rufelt   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3031

Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:57 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haptic_suit

 

 

On May 31, 2013, a Kickstarter campaign was launched to raise funds for the development of ARAIG (As Real As It Gets), a force-feedback and electrical muscle stimulation wearable device for use in video games. It features 16 points of feedback on the front, 16 on the back and 8 on each side. The Kickstarter campaign failed, as it only raised $126,625 of its $900,000 goal.

 

:(



#9 3DModelerMan   Members   -  Reputation: 935

Posted 26 January 2014 - 02:36 PM

I think a direct brain interface is really the only way to produce a simulation of holodeck quality. Although I would be curious to see what sort of side effects a device like that would have. It would be intercepting and filtering signals from the spinal cord, so it would probably be quite dangerous at first.






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