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old interpreter cint


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#1 fir   Members   -  Reputation: -442

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:22 AM

Recently I was interested in c interpreters (never yet used it) 

and found a one named cint. I downloaded binary verdion for windows

and i can easy and nice run the console interpreter of c - its nice

 

Then i was trying to use it with winapi (which i will be much more interested in)

but it seem that I would need a precompiled binary of something needed

for win32 of make self to compile this from sources

 

Sadly to say I am totaly not experienced in using make, compiling this also

is harder for some other reasons - there is said i need to instal cygwin 

(I am also not experienced with this), there also seems that this cint sources

are very outdated and ready for compiling with only old compilers (?)

 

this is troublesome for me (not enough experienced ), so i failed

This is a little sorry (sad), because i would be merry to use this with winapi

 

could maybe someone hint me wuth that - would be it maybe finaly with some hints (and not to much effort bigger than say 2 hours of trying) possible to obtain 

for me.. or maibe you will advice me to give up (fail) with this?

 

It would be a bit better to do it than fail with it but if this is so troublesome i could fail too :C

 

 

 

 



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#2 ProtectedMode   Members   -  Reputation: 1084

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:46 AM

I would advice you to stop trying to use cint, as it's indeed a bit outdated. Other points are that there isn't much to find about it on the internet and as you've noticed, using it is not very simpel either.

 

Here are some other modern embedded scripting languages that you can try, I guess you can find the tutorials yourself:

  • AngelScript. Not very popular, but good enough documentation to get started and a nice C++ like interface. (This assumes you are using C++)
  • Lua. This one is very popular and used in many software and games. LuaJIT has very good performance and there are a lot of libraries out there that help you exposing your own interface to Lua or in the other direction. Lua is made in C but can also be used with C++.
  • Mono. This is the open-source implementation of C# and can also be embedded into your program. There is very good documentation. The downside however is that it's very big and a bit more heavy. However, it features good performance and embedding is not that hard I think. (But I haven't used it myself...)

There are also more heavy languages which you can embed like JS and Python. This question contains links to many other scripting libraries and I'm sure you can find more yourself.

 

If you don't want to use any of these you will have to spend some of your time on learning to build libraries like cint.



#3 fir   Members   -  Reputation: -442

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:55 AM

I would advice you to stop trying to use cint, as it's indeed a bit outdated. Other points are that there isn't much to find about it on the internet and as you've noticed, using it is not very simpel either.

 

Here are some other modern embedded scripting languages that you can try, I guess you can find the tutorials yourself:

  • AngelScript. Not very popular, but good enough documentation to get started and a nice C++ like interface. (This assumes you are using C++)
  • Lua. This one is very popular and used in many software and games. LuaJIT has very good performance and there are a lot of libraries out there that help you exposing your own interface to Lua or in the other direction. Lua is made in C but can also be used with C++.
  • Mono. This is the open-source implementation of C# and can also be embedded into your program. There is very good documentation. The downside however is that it's very big and a bit more heavy. However, it features good performance and embedding is not that hard I think. (But I haven't used it myself...)

There are also more heavy languages which you can embed like JS and Python. This question contains links to many other scripting libraries and I'm sure you can find more yourself.

 

If you don't want to use any of these you will have to spend some of your time on learning to build libraries like cint.

 

no, though tnx for answer, i decided to use c as a scripting language

(it has to be some strong advantages for me, for example i am very learned to c synta, 2) i could move script to compile side with no revritting)

 

There are other options than cint I not tried this yet so i maybe try the other, though some info i readed about this cint was ice to me - main problem is I got no precompiled version of its win32 library (othervise i would be toying with that)



#4 Karsten_   Members   -  Reputation: 1499

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 12:38 PM

I use CINT on UNIX for our build scripts where it "just works". I have never tried it on Windows. You will generally need binaries of a library in order to use them and you will often need to write your own binding layer since although CINT is C/C++ it is not running natively so you will need to bind it to native libraries (as is also required when using Python, .NET, JS and others) since there is no linking stage.

 

Fyi, CINT is a bit obsolete these days, it has been replaced by cling (http://root.cern.ch/drupal/content/cling). This is much more modern and uses clang / LLVM as a backend. Using C/C++ as an interpreter is still very much alive at CERN smile.png

 

You might also be interested in Pico C (http://code.google.com/p/picoc/). It is really light in comparison to CINT but you will still need to implement bindings to "non-core" libraries yourself.

 

 

There are also more heavy languages which you can embed like JS and Python.

The mentioned "Mono" is much heavier than JS and Python and unless you only ever use bindings that someone else has written, you will still need to be able to build native libraries and write the managed/scripted wrapper yourself anyway. I find developers always seem to forget this fact when using .NET, Java etc...


Edited by Karsten_, 01 February 2014 - 12:47 PM.

Mutiny - Open-source C++ Unity re-implementation.
Defile of Eden 2 - FreeBSD and OpenBSD binaries of our latest game.


#5 fir   Members   -  Reputation: -442

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 01:14 PM

TNX 4 the info, PICO looks very interesting (the other i will also try to check up)






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