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Are sound modules still relevant?


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#1 xCatalyst   Members   -  Reputation: 232

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 12:59 PM

So, I've recently found an interest in a more 'classic' sound to video game music. I was wondering if things like sound modules were still relevant in the industry; I'd like to invest in something like an old Roland SC-88 to achieve a sort of lo-fi, yet modern sound to some of my music, but I don't want to do it if they aren't used much anymore.

 

Does anybody have experience in sound/ MIDI modules, and use thereof in this day and age? Any advice is appreciated:)



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#2 BeatscribeMusic   Members   -  Reputation: 178

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 01:15 PM

They are sill used. I you see some of the stuff going on at chipmusic.org there are a lot of vintage gear being used especially for live performances. Some guys do "all hardware" shows with no computers involved. Of course there are usually digital tools like vsts and aus that can come close to the authentic sound, but nothing is gonna be 100% the same as vintage gear.

#3 xCatalyst   Members   -  Reputation: 232

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 11:17 AM

Right, okay thanks a ton. That's what I needed to know.

 

Also, thanks for letting me know about that site, I'll have to check it out a bit more when I have time:)



#4 BeatscribeMusic   Members   -  Reputation: 178

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 07:46 AM

Yeah chiptune is a blast. It's a very alive scene too. If you love wires and modified nitnendos and classic sounds, you'll want to be a part of it!



#5 nsmadsen   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3647

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:39 AM

Quite a bit of the studios I've seen or worked in have been a mixture of hardware and software. My own studio is almost 100% software. I used to have a Roland module but after really investing in quite a bit more virtual instruments, I found the module going unused for long periods of time. So I sold it. I kind of regret that now...


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#6 Kryzon   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 2543

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 02:29 PM

They are relevant if you are looking for this particular kind of sound. There's always a place for some sorts of sounds.

I am also interested in classic sound-module timbres. These sounds evoke nostalgia very easily.

You can find some sound-module libraries at the Digital Sound Factory store. This way you don't need to purchase vintage hardware:
https://www.digitalsoundfactory.com/

#7 BeatscribeMusic   Members   -  Reputation: 178

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 04:14 PM

Quite a bit of the studios I've seen or worked in have been a mixture of hardware and software. My own studio is almost 100% software. I used to have a Roland module but after really investing in quite a bit more virtual instruments, I found the module going unused for long periods of time. So I sold it. I kind of regret that now...

 

I've gone the same route, the extra work of recording analog equipment and the inability to quickly change tempo or rearrange things you've recorded like that just makes it more efficient to use digital samples. The loss of quality or "magic" of hardware is so minimal, that most of the time it's not worth it for me.






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