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Needing help on how to "re-begin" on C++


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#1 cuccate   Members   -  Reputation: 180

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 09:32 AM

Hey guys... I'm 17 and I'm from Brazil... I studied programming a few years ago... But there aren't many good job opportunities for programmers here... I actually had some really nice content on C++ but It was in English and I didn't have a good understanding on it back there and after a problem with my Hard Drive I lost all that content...Due to those things, I dropped programming.

Well...But I want to come back because I really enjoyed programming and I want to start from the beginning, that's why  I'm creating this topic.

I would like to have some suggestions on good C++ Programming books and on a good compiler.

Thanks for reading, and I hope someone can help me ^^
 



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#2 dejaime   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4119

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 09:46 AM

If you're looking for free content, there's always wikibooks.org, online tutorials such as cplusplus.com tutorials.

If your intent is to buy a physical copy of a book, there's C++ Primer and C++ for Dummies (for a more introductory approach).

 

I use MinGW on all computer platforms.

 

E bem vindo ao fórum!


Edited by dejaime, 10 February 2014 - 12:41 PM.


#3 Buckeye   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6363

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 09:52 AM

I don't have any suggestions about recent programming books. Mine go back quite a few years, I'm afraid.

 

However, with regard to compilers, you can download Visual Studio Express from Microsoft. It's free though you will have to register with Microsoft. Also, I don't know if you would qualify, but you may also want to look into Microsoft's student license or student discounts. Often you can get full versions of things like Visual Studio for free, or for a very low price. If you do decide on Visual Studio, there may be companion books available from Microsoft Press. The Windows SDK likely has sample applications from which you can learn.

 

In addition, Visual Studio and a lot of Microsoft software is supported pretty well here on gamedev if you have problems.


Edited by Buckeye, 10 February 2014 - 09:53 AM.

Please don't PM me with questions. Post them in the forums for everyone's benefit, and I can embarrass myself publicly.


#4 Nathan2222_old   Members   -  Reputation: -400

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 10:17 AM

Jumping into c++ and the cplusplus.com pdf are great (really good), i'm using them. For more advanced and still beginner-ish tutorial, try the programming practice and principles using c++ pdf (it is too complicated for me though).

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#5 cuccate   Members   -  Reputation: 180

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 10:52 AM

Well...Thanks for your support guys!

I've read some good stuff about the C++ Primer...So maybe I'll buy it...
I really like the cplusplus.com  website, I think I used to use it back when I was programming...
and I was checking some old stuff I have here and I found a Visual Studio 2010 Setup DVD...

guess I'll start soon ^^, thanks again for your help, guys!



#6 krinosx   Members   -  Reputation: 563

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 12:08 PM

Hi Cuccate,

 

if you are starting with programming, try something easy... c++ is overwhelming for a new programmer... Its a lot of tech details and you will spend lots of time to understand the compiling, linking, using third party libraries and will loose your focus on programming techniques/logic....

 

If you already know programming logic/theory ( control instructions, compiling, complex algorithms, etc ) so, try to start with 'C' ( yes.. the simple C ). Its like c++ but a little easy to get in.... you may try to program something simple in C to get comfortable with Pointers, memory allocation and other language facets...so, when you became confident with C, you may jump in c++ world... it will be less painful... trust me... :)

 

I good tutorial to start: 

http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c/lesson1.html

 

And you can find some good books on C in portuguese, ( translations to portuguese )  but you will spend R$100+ to get one... ( I am also from brazil, and this books are expensive here... )

 

Well... If you are ready to start codding in C or even in C++ I suggest you download the Visual Studio 2010 ( express/free edition ) from Microsoft site ( http://www.visualstudio.com/ ) and start codding.... if you use MAC OSx, use the XCode.. its a awesome tool... a bit hard to understand in the start.. but once you understand the workflow its very productive!

 

Hope it helps...



#7 cuccate   Members   -  Reputation: 180

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 12:42 PM

Hey krinosx,

Well...That's actually the way I did when I started programming... I started with C and then I went to C++.
Since I'm trying to come back to programming now, I thought that starting from the beginning with a good book would be a nice way to refresh my memory and maybe learn something that I missed.

Thanks for that website, I'll use it for sure, making some codes in C is a good way to "restart" hehe biggrin.png


Edited by cuccate, 10 February 2014 - 12:43 PM.


#8 Aliii   Members   -  Reputation: 1448

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:49 PM

http://www.learncpp.com/

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/index.html

http://www.cplusplus.com/

 

Its not really a book or tutorial, but you will visit this place a lot: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/c%2B%2B

 

The best way would be probably to find a fun project and start working on it.


Edited by Aliii, 10 February 2014 - 01:56 PM.


#9 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5791

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:56 PM

C++ books as a whole have done a really piss poor job of updating to C++11.  Many of the ones I checked out simply bolted C++ 11 features on as additional chapters, which is a very wrong headed approach to it.

 

If you understand the basics of C++, C++ for the Impatient ( http://www.amazon.ca/C-Impatient-Brian-Overland/dp/0321888022 ) is among the best C++ books in terms of modern functionality.  It assumes you know what you are doing however, at least so far as general programming concepts go.



#10 Rifts605   Members   -  Reputation: 240

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 04:42 PM

I can personally recommend several sites: learncpp.com(very beginner-friendly, with extremely good explanations), cplusplus.com(has loads of information on many aspects of programming), and cprogramming.com, which despite it's name, has many tutorials on C++ as well. Some good books are Beginning C++ Through Game Programming 3rd Edition, if you are looking to start over from the very basics, as well as C++ Primer. 

 

The most important thing to do is just learn something and get started on a project, as you will learn far more from actually doing something than you will ever learn than simply by reading from a book. Good luck!


If Walt Disney can figure out how to make people pay to stand in line all day, I can surely master programming...

#11 Petrov_VA   Members   -  Reputation: 596

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 05:02 PM


The best way would be probably to find a fun project and start working on it.

I agree with above. NeHe's OpenGL Win32 projects may provide a good support for the books and tutorials.



#12 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5481

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 05:48 PM

If you are already familiar with programming, and not a complete newcomer to C++, there is nothing better than the most recent (4th) edition of Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language."  It's information dense yet eminently readable, covers the entire language complete with rationale, and present design and implementation philosophies fundamental to effective use of the language. 


Stephen M. Webb
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#13 MarekKnows.com   Members   -  Reputation: 740

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 07:45 AM

I also like to use http://www.codeproject.com/, there are some interesting articles there.


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#14 cdoubleplusgood   Members   -  Reputation: 848

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 08:57 AM


I found a Visual Studio 2010 Setup DVD...

Why not get Visual Studio 2013 Express, it's free (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=40787). It supports much more of the new C++11 features, although support is still incomplete (shame on you, Microsoft!).

Or get the Code::Blocks IDE (http://www.codeblocks.org/). The included GNU compiler is even more free and more standard compliant.

And, yes: C++11 matters



#15 cdoubleplusgood   Members   -  Reputation: 848

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 09:05 AM


C++ books as a whole have done a really piss poor job of updating to C++11. Many of the ones I checked out simply bolted C++ 11 features on as additional chapters, which is a very wrong headed approach to it.

This is true, but there is one good reason for keeping the C++11 stuff separated: Compiler support. If the examples in the book require some feature your compiler does not support, you're lost. If it's optional, you can skip that part for now.



#16 dejaime   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4119

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:27 AM


and I was checking some old stuff I have here

It is never a good idea to study a programming language on outdated resources and using outdated tools when you can avoid it. Specially now, that the language is evolving and we have so many good new features to experiment with and use.

 

Take a look at this link: http://cpprocks.com/c11-compiler-support-shootout-visual-studio-gcc-clang-intel/

 

So, you'll be good with g++, clang or microsoft compiler, given that you're using their last versions. Just try to avoid using 2010- resources, or you'll probably need to re-re-begin soon. Use the fact that you're refreshing the basics to include the new features, and start to wrap your head around them, as they'll be the standard some day.


Edited by dejaime, 11 February 2014 - 11:40 AM.


#17 cuccate   Members   -  Reputation: 180

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:32 PM

Thanks a lot for all of your support, links and tips, guys!
You're helping me a lot! 
I'm now upgrading my old resources happy.png 
 






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