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Uniting real programming with a game engine.


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#1 Evan O'Hara   Members   -  Reputation: 117

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 06:38 PM

Ok, so, I've gone through a textbook learning C++ basics and I've also gone through a textbook teaching directx.
After that I downloaded UDK and went through probably 15 hours worth of tutorials and I get the basics of it as well. Same with 3DSmax.

There doesn't seem to be any tutorial that tries to unite the tools of the engine with any real programming. There is basically just level design everywhere.

What section of knowledge do I need to study to figure out how to unite the two?



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#2 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1471

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 07:25 PM

 Most of the time you import libraries from the game engine into your code.

Other times you create scripts for the game engine to use.

Please research the specific API for the game engine you wish to use.

 

 [HERE] is the documentation for UDK .

If you are still having issues, go to the community forums.


Edited by Shippou, 12 February 2014 - 07:30 PM.

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#3 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 28613

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:56 PM

In UDK, you'll do all of your "real programming" in the UnrealScript language (which is similar to C++ or Java).

 

They intentionally restrict your ability to use any language that you like (such as C++), because this is a feature that they sell as part of their actual Unreal engine (the very expensive, professional version of UDK).



#4 GuyWithBeard   Members   -  Reputation: 801

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 03:20 AM

A few points:

 

1. How do you define "real" programming? C++? Native code? Low-level code? Writing gameplay logic in UnrealScript is just as "real" as writing the logic of a multithreaded rendering back-end in C++. So, when using UDK, the real programming is done in UnrealScript, with Unity it's C# etc.

2. If you wanted to do low-level programming (eg. C++ and DirectX like you mentioned) why are you using a game engine at all? The point of most game engines is that you don't have to do that sort of thing. They allow you to concentrate on the game itself.

3. Like Hodgman mentioned, access to the engine source code is sometimes a licensing question. But more importantly, most engines are designed so that you would have to touch the engine code as little as possible, even if you were fully qualified to do so. Even if you were writing your own engine, you would probably layer it so that you don't have to touch areas such as threading and memory management when doing gameplay logic. This, of course, varies with every codebase.



#5 Evan O'Hara   Members   -  Reputation: 117

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 12:24 PM

Thanks for the responses guys, I have looked up into it more, I was going to avoid learning unrealscript because I read somewhere that they will just be using C++ when unreal 4 comes to us.  I have decided just to learn unrealscript and I am pretty happy with it so far.

A few points:

 

1. How do you define "real" programming? C++? Native code? Low-level code? Writing gameplay logic in UnrealScript is just as "real" as writing the logic of a multithreaded rendering back-end in C++. So, when using UDK, the real programming is done in UnrealScript, with Unity it's C# etc.

2. If you wanted to do low-level programming (eg. C++ and DirectX like you mentioned) why are you using a game engine at all? The point of most game engines is that you don't have to do that sort of thing. They allow you to concentrate on the game itself.

3. Like Hodgman mentioned, access to the engine source code is sometimes a licensing question. But more importantly, most engines are designed so that you would have to touch the engine code as little as possible, even if you were fully qualified to do so. Even if you were writing your own engine, you would probably layer it so that you don't have to touch areas such as threading and memory management when doing gameplay logic. This, of course, varies with every codebase.

1. I see real programming as basically definition of your own classes through use of a low-level language. (There is more to it than that, but it doesn't seem like I would need it for much more than that in UDK.)

2. I have learned from using UDK that I need to combine the two in order to really make the game my own.  If I want my own weapons or want to change the style of the game to something like an RPG, it seems like I need more control over my environment than some object/lighting placement and camera movement.

3. It doesn't seem like I can get away from coding when using the UDK.  I can make my own static meshes and textures.  I can place them and define some variables about them.  I can place lighting and stuff like that, but it just feels like without my own coding I am just level designing for an unreal tournament game.

As a disclaimer, I am still learning UDK, and am reading a book on unreal script now.  I do not know everything the editor encompasses, but I've gone to the end of every available video tutorial I can find and they never touch anything like weapon creation or creation of a UI.

Thanks all! :)






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