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Valve's "source" engine


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#1 JustColorado   Members   -  Reputation: 149

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 04:56 PM

I never hear anyone talking about Valve when discussing which game engine to use.

 

And I couldn't even really figure out what the terms were from their website.

 

Apparently the engine is Free if you buy any game built on it.

So basically for $9.99 I just buy half life 2, and then I have a complete access to royalty free use

that engine to build a game?  

 

Or is this just a modding tool, that a game can't be built with?

 

 


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"If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research. " - Einstein
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#2 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22222

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:22 PM

For just you? Or for a team with industry veteran programmers, modelers, animators, designers, audio, and other professionals?


The engine is not something for cutting your teeth with. It is something a professional studio with an experienced teem of veterans in all disciplines could leverage.

The reason you don't hear it talked about on gd.net is because it is not something for beginners, nor is it even something for intermediate developers. It is difficult to use, and is a good representation of a grizzled engine that has seen the war of producing major games.

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#3 JustColorado   Members   -  Reputation: 149

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:27 PM

I am planning to put together a small team.  

 

$9.99 sounds like an almost too good to be true price if it is comparable to Cry and UDK


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research. " - Einstein
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

#4 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22222

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:34 PM

If you are worried about a few thousand dollars, I'm almost certain the Source engine is going to be far beyond your abilities.

From everything I have read and seen, it is a great engine. It isn't an EASY engine by any means. Look at the code, seriously dig in to it, and make certain about your choice before you go too far down that road.

UDK, Unity, Oblivion, C4, and many others had "easy to use" as part of their design philosophy. Source did not.

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#5 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30942

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:36 PM

So basically for $9.99 I just buy half life 2, and then I have a complete access to royalty free use that engine to build a game?

No.
You can actually get it for free (without even buying HL2)... but that doesn't give you a license to do what you want with it.
You can't sell your creations without negotiating (buying) a license from Valve.

If you want to make a free game/mod, or a freely available prototype of a game, then it may be suitable for you.
 

The engine is not something for cutting your teeth with. It is something a professional studio with an experienced teem of veterans in all disciplines could leverage.

I cut my teeth on GoldSource (though Unity/UDK didn't exist at the time), and would recommend the same path to others who want to learn C++ game programming. Sure it's complicated, but you'll gain a lot of exposure to and experience with real-world, shipping C++ game code, and real-world, non-user-friendly tools and pipelines laugh.png



#6 JustColorado   Members   -  Reputation: 149

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:53 PM

"You can't sell your creations without negotiating (buying) a license from Valve."

That pretty much clears up my question for me.  

 

"UDK, Unity, Oblivion, C4, and many others had "easy to use" as part of their design philosophy."

I am learning UDK for 4 months now, and still haven't explored at least half of the features.

if that platform is easy, I would hate to see what hard is.  

 

Seems like this could be great option for when I reach a level somewhere much further than I am today.

 

Thanks guys

cool.png


Edited by JustColorado, 20 February 2014 - 05:56 PM.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research. " - Einstein
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

#7 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22222

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:58 PM

The engine is not something for cutting your teeth with. It is something a professional studio with an experienced teem of veterans in all disciplines could leverage.

I cut my teeth on GoldSource (though Unity/UDK didn't exist at the time), and would recommend the same path to others who want to learn C++ game programming. Sure it's complicated, but you'll gain a lot of exposure to and experience with real-world, shipping C++ game code, and real-world, non-user-friendly tools and pipelines :lol:
Ouch.

Okay, I guess some people can do that.

Personally I don't recommend the baptism by fire approach, but hey, who am I to recommend against gasoline and matches? :)

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#8 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4555

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 10:03 PM

Proceed by answering the following questions:

 

1. Are you Hodgman? Yes/No.

 

Now evaluate your results against this list:

 

1.

If you selected Yes  ->  Use Source

If you selected No    ->  Don't use source.


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

My journals: dustArtemis ECS framework and Making a Terrain Generator


#9 gia   Members   -  Reputation: 139

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 01:02 AM

It isnt THAT complicated, it isn't perfect however, they love to "update" the engine and break every single mod out there, then promise a fix, and take their damn sweet time to fix it (you better just figure out how to hack around the problem). Then you do have to negotiate a license whenever you finish your "mod", usually that happens after you manage to get greenlit on their greenlight section. If that happens you'll have to shell some big cash upfront (havok license) and get to terms with valve on how to pay for their engine (probably another cut from sales, the first being from steam).

 

It is a nice engine to work with if you are a beginner to game programming that already handles c++. If you cant handle c++ however then, well, learn it...

 

You'll need a team or be a one man army though, it has an art pipeline you have to learn afterall.


Edited by gia, 22 February 2014 - 01:03 AM.


#10 Godmil   Members   -  Reputation: 744

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 05:12 PM

It may be worth pointing out that TheChineseRoom are currently porting Dear Esther from source to unity after being stung by an unexplained per-platform licencing fee by a third party whose software is a part of source. 



#11 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30942

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 12:35 AM


after being stung by an unexplained per-platform licencing fee by a third party whose software is a part of source.
This is to be expected with any big professional engine, like Source, Unreal, Cry, etc... Prices upwards of $100k per platform would not be unexpected.

#12 dejaime   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4051

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 04:51 PM

It is the good old free engine for free games case.

You can't use the source engine that comes with your steam account to create and sell games.

Anyway, some people consider source to be outdated, and there was all that fuzz about Source 2.0 a while back...

 

But yeah, if you don't have an investor, or a money mine, and want to create something commercial, you should probably look somewhere else.






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