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Not sure where to start. Fire Emblem type game.


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#1 rb7_brady   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 11:50 AM

Hey guys, i've been wanting to make a game for a while now, but the hardest part is the initial step. I really would like to make a relatively simple 2d fire emblem-like strategy rpg game. I am pretty knowledgeable in Java and C# among other languages but would prefer to use those if i can. I have no idea what my first step would be though. I would eventually like to release it somehow on steam greenlight or xbox live. But seeing that XNA is no longer being developed i dont think i should go down that road. What are some of the standards for start up indie developers? Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.



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#2 Buckeye   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4924

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 06:37 PM

You've asked what is probably THE most asked question on gamdev. One place to start is by searching here on gamdev for "where do I start." In the upper right-hand corner of the page you're looking at is a search box. Type in "where do i start" and click.

 

Though you mention that you're knowledgeable in a couple languages, a more important consideration is: Have you programmed a game?

 

If "where do I start?" is the most asked question, the most popular response is: "Make a game," usually with suggestions about keeping it simple - tic-tac-toe, pong, etc.


Please don't PM me with questions. Post them in the forums for everyone's benefit, and I can embarrass myself publicly.


#3 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21322

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 06:52 PM

Indeed, to save some searching of the forums:

 

In increasing order:

 

* Guess the number style games. (learn about programming basics)

* Tic-tac-toe and Reversi and Connect Four style games. (learn about AI and simple logic)

* Text based dungeon explorer (learn about data management and world processing)

 

Eventually you will move on to graphical games:

 

* Pong clone. (learn about the game loop for animated games, simple graphics, audio, AI, game flow and game states, simple physics with collision detection and response, and much more. Beginners are frequently surprised at just how complex this game can become.)

* Breakout clone. (follow up to pong, teaches about levels and level data, additional physics and collision code, also allows for powerups, visual effects, and so on.)

* Tetris clone. (falling blocks often aren't what they seem. Teach about moving objects on maps in addition to the items above.)

* Platformer, such as Donkey Kong clone or very simple Mario clone. (all of the above, only more.)

 

Don't worry about XNA being "dead".  XNA is a wrapper for DX9. It is just as dead as DX9, which means it is not going anywhere and will be viable for a decade or more. This can be a VERY GOOD thing. Choosing DX11 compels you to work around a high-throughput model designed for major high-performance games. Using a simple stable platform can be better than a more complex moving target.


Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#4 rb7_brady   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 08:02 PM

You've asked what is probably THE most asked question on gamdev. One place to start is by searching here on gamdev for "where do I start." In the upper right-hand corner of the page you're looking at is a search box. Type in "where do i start" and click.

 

Though you mention that you're knowledgeable in a couple languages, a more important consideration is: Have you programmed a game?

 

If "where do I start?" is the most asked question, the most popular response is: "Make a game," usually with suggestions about keeping it simple - tic-tac-toe, pong, etc.

Yeah sorry i should have been clearer. I know how to make games. I've made a couple in the past; however i've never used an engine or tools allow you to use the engine. I guess what i want to know is what are the best options to maximize portability. I've thought about unity but the sense from the community i get is that its not that great. I'm kind of leaning more toward creating a java application using Slick2d but idk how easy that is to port to the internet.



#5 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21322

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 09:14 PM

I guess what i want to know is what are the best options to maximize portability. I've thought about unity but the sense from the community i get is that its not that great. I'm kind of leaning more toward creating a java application using Slick2d but idk how easy that is to port to the internet.

 
Unity is nice, but it is big.
 
This class of engines is WONDERFUL if you have a bit of programming background, and you have a modeler who basically knows what they are doing, and an animator who basically knows what they are doing, and a designer who basically knows what they are doing.  Even just two people, one for design and code and the other for models and graphics, Unity can be incredibly powerful. 
 
 
But most people who post in For Beginners don't know how to program. They often don't understand the difference between an IDE and MS Word. That kind of beginner will not typically be well served by jumping headfirst into a major engine.
 
If it is just you, and you are just getting introduced to programming and you are working alone, Unity is probably too big. Unreal is probably too big. C4 is probably too big. Source is probably too big.
 
Can people do it? Certainly, people have done it. If you are a "baptism by fire" kind of person, you might enjoy jumping directly into any of the larger engines.
 
 
You mentioned several key words. Specifically, "port to the internet", "pretty knowledgeable in Java", "portable", and "mobile".  That points almost directly to libGDX. It is a small library of functionality, small enough that a single developer can make their own programmer art without much difficulty and create reasonably good games by themselves.
Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.




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