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Early start and feedback


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#1 andrepnh   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:50 PM

I've decided to get experience at game design and development using Game A Week, which is, basically:

  • Make one game during a week
  • Publish it no matter what
  • Don't repeat yourself
  • Never revisit a game
  • Keep a journal

I've published my first game, made last week, at itch.io, and I'm keeping this blog about my Game A Week. So far so good, but I need comments, opinions, critics. Is there any place in this forum or on the internet specially suited for this? Just feedback, not really selling my games? I've looked into it, but so far I've found only indie stuff. The tricky thing is I'm not experienced at game development and things are made in just a week. Results are amateurish, so I'm not sure even "indie" is appropriate.



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#2 EricsonWillians   Members   -  Reputation: 288

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 09:55 PM

Well.. Very good, and I enjoyed the "twist" feature smile.png.

 

Nevertheless, I recommend you to implement the "pong" game "by yourself" using a library like SDL, Allegro or Pygame. In my personal opinion, I don't completely consider "making a game in Unity" making a game. A lot of people could disagree with me, but, the more the developer know what is actually happening, the better. I'm implementing an engine with Pygame/Python, and I've made it open-source and with a lot of useful 2D features like buit-in class to deal with animations from spritesheets and scrolling backgrounds and grids, etc etc etc (Therefore, if someone uses my engine, it could feel like "I don't know how it works, but works"). The same could apply to the library itself and the operational system (And everything that came before). But the thing is: The engine is the very bridge between the low-level library and the actual game with its content. It's good to know that, if you have a way to move an image on the screen, you can make a game out of it, no matter the language/environment. Unity and Unreal Engine have some fancy features that are more valuable when fully understood.

 

By the way, I recommend Python and Pygame. Just because I love it. If you really don't want it, than I recommend SDL over Allegro. If you want plain C, I recommend Allegro. Try developing your own "Pong Engine", and tweaking with it. Figure out how to draw rectangles on the screen with the library, how to deal with the inputs and everything, and organize the code in classes/methods or functions. Your progress shall be much, much greater than playing with Unity.


Edited by EricsonWillians, 17 March 2014 - 10:01 PM.

Creator and only composer at Poisone Wein and Übelkraft dark musical projects:

 


#3 andrepnh   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 09:00 AM

My idea is to start with easy things (Unity) first, slowly stepping up the challenge. I believe if I had tried something not Unity-like for Pong With a Twist I would end up with a worse game. To me Unity looks like is a nice introduction to how game development works, how things are structured. Basics like the object is one thing, but the mesh, the material, collider and the texture are something else. I've seen that in some games and modding stuff, but handling it directly is different. It gives you a notion of how to do things right.

 

Next, not sure when thou, I'm going to try jMonkey, a free, open-source and actively developed Java engine. I'm more familiar with Java, so I think it's a nice step. I also like Python a lot, it's quite productive, so I'll try Pygame too. Thanks for the tip! smile.png



#4 EricsonWillians   Members   -  Reputation: 288

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 01:53 PM

I've tried Java as well and failed miserably smile.png. I've tried the LWJGL and failed miserably because I could not properly config the external library on Eclipse. Today my main programming choice is IntelliJ Idea, so maybe I'll play with it later (Actually I've made a game recently in Java, but it was for Android). I've tried almost a year ago, and I believe that I could make it work now. Anyway..

 

I understand that Unity or Unreal Engine might be a good professional reference.

 

I recommend you another thing for you to practice:

 

Please, take a deep good look at Khan Academy: https://www.khanacademy.org/ 

 

In the "programming" section they have a tool that allows you to draw shapes and deal with inputs REALLY easily, but you're not allowed to use images. The language is Javascript, but it's really easy to play with it. Try to implement the pong game directly on their programming section. Explore the advanced programs that the users do as well. You'll be impressed. (And they have 9999 Math/Physics/Everything tutorials which are useful for game development).


Edited by EricsonWillians, 18 March 2014 - 01:54 PM.

Creator and only composer at Poisone Wein and Übelkraft dark musical projects:

 


#5 andrepnh   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:36 PM

Thanks, I'll definitely need those Math and Physics lessons. Quaternions look specially puzzling to me unsure.png



#6 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:39 PM

Well if you're looking for a game to do every week, check out my sig.


Beginner in Game Development? Read here.
 
Super Mario Bros clone tutorial written in XNA 4.0 [MonoGame, ANX, and MonoXNA] by Scott Haley
 
If you have found any of the posts helpful, please show your appreciation by clicking the up arrow on those posts Posted Image
 
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#7 andrepnh   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 09:37 AM

Well if you're looking for a game to do every week, check out my sig.

You mention that first I should pick a language and game library, and that engines should be avoided, but does it really pay to start at a lower level? Take physics and math, both complex subjects. I believe game engine abstracts some part of that away from you, so you don't have to build your own faulty version of real world physics into your game, (re)invent the square wheel. I understand that I must have a good knowledge of physics/math, but, for now, I don't think it pays to learn something you're just going to throw away along the road because a tool does a much better job than you. Unless I've got it all wrong...



#8 BCullis   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 10:02 AM


In my personal opinion, I don't completely consider "making a game in Unity" making a game. A lot of people could disagree with me

As they should.  Whatever you use to get the end result, if there's a game at the end, you made a game.  If it's fun, you made a good game.  If I'm playing something fun, I can't tell if the folks behind it cobbled everything together in assembly over a decade, or used a rapid-prototyping environment and 3 weeks to complete the whole thing.  Nor do I care, because the GAME is the focus.

That being said, as a software engineer, I completely understand the sense of accomplishment that comes from building/re-engineering something yourself, we as coders like making stuff and playing with our bits and bytes like legos, but claiming that it's not actually "making a game" if you're not in the weeds with your own home-brew I/O library and renderer is categorically incorrect, opinion or otherwise.


Hazard Pay :: FPS/RTS in SharpDX
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