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Understanding whats going on


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#1 4mad3u5   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:30 PM

So I have a little bit of programming and engineering experience. I am trying to figure out what's going on here. I would like to use an open source compiler to compile opengl code. I would just like the knowledge of libraries and pre-processor header files and how they work. I am looking at opengl code and I see that I can use some header file and not others. I am working with the supper bible series 1-6. I am looking at the header files and I can see that I can compile with gcc with some header files and not others. I am starting from the first book of the supper bible series and seeing what I can compile. I know I can compile most code up to 3.1, then I can't work with any of the libraries. I know that a lot of the code has depreciated and is not forward compatible, this is what is making it very difficult for me because I have to see where I can start from. If anyone can please explain to me what is going on here I would really appreciate it.



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#2 4mad3u5   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:39 PM

I can use these four header files and anything after that doesn't work with a gcc compiler 

 

#include <GL/glew.h>
#include <GL/gl.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <GL/glut.h>

Edited by 4mad3u5, 24 March 2014 - 01:18 AM.


#3 4mad3u5   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:46 PM

I am not able to work with the GLTools.h header file


Edited by 4mad3u5, 24 March 2014 - 01:17 AM.


#4 mark ds   Members   -  Reputation: 1485

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:56 PM

GLTools.h isn't a standard header file with any compiler - I guess it's something specific to the author of the super bible books. You can probably download the source for the books (at least you usually can) which should have the header included...

 

However, I suggest that you don't rely on someone else's proprietary include files for the simple reason that it may mislead you into believing that it is something to do with GL. Beyond that, I can't say as I've never read those particular books.



#5 4mad3u5   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:48 PM

Thank you very much sr. I know what is going on now and I can deal with it. 



#6 mark ds   Members   -  Reputation: 1485

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:28 PM

Can I ask why you don't want to use Visual Studio? The premier versions are exquisite , and the free versions are excellent! Better than anything else on the market (in my own humble opinion).

 

If you've been led to this dislike of VS by a tutor, I'd strongly recommend ignoring those opinions. VS free edition, with all it's faults, is pretty damn good.


Edited by mark ds, 24 March 2014 - 08:00 PM.


#7 4mad3u5   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 09:51 PM

Umm i just don't like to be tied down to one compiler and I want to know what is going on behind the scene. Learning how to do this has taught me a lot about how to add folders with header and library files. I have found out how dynamic link libraries and static linked libraries work, and how to add multiple files to project. All using a command line. It's really my instructor got me going down this route. He says that MSVS express has a date on it and they could tell everyone to just stop using it, please this is not politics, that they might just start charging everyone and it would be very difficult transition and its just better to know how everything is really working.   



#8 mhagain   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8281

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 02:03 AM

It's really my instructor got me going down this route. He says that MSVS express has a date on it and they could tell everyone to just stop using it, please this is not politics, that they might just start charging everyone and it would be very difficult transition and its just better to know how everything is really working.   

 

That's not even remotely true.  The Express editions are and always have been "free permanently" (that's "free as in beer").  There are plenty of online references to support this - e.g http://blogs.msdn.com/b/rprabhu/archive/2006/04/21/580446.aspx - you should ask your instructor for a reference to support his own claim.

 

Wanting to have experience with multiple tools is good, but VS is very much an industry standard, so you should include that in the set of tools you get experience with.


It appears that the gentleman thought C++ was extremely difficult and he was overjoyed that the machine was absorbing it; he understood that good C++ is difficult but the best C++ is well-nigh unintelligible.





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