Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

ive made a simple pong, what next?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
11 replies to this topic

#1 welly_59   Members   -  Reputation: 230

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:16 PM

ive been learning c# and monogame for a while now but have recently(yesterdat) moved to unity. Ive created a simple pong game, using some simple ai for the computer player, implemented a scoreboard and created a simple menu.

 

what next from here? would you say i should carry on with this game for a bit ie add sound effects, options(ai difficulty) etc or move onto something else?

 

my c# knowledge is pretty limited right now, but not as limited as my knowledge of unity!



Sponsor:

#2 welly_59   Members   -  Reputation: 230

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:17 PM

what im asking i suppose is what you would you reccomend i do to improve my c# while also improving my unity skills



#3 DareDeveloper   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 977

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:31 PM

I guess I would not try to get a better understanding of a language (build a routine using it) by developing a game.

I'd probably go for solving Google Code Jam problems ... or similar coding challenges with C# and then return to learning game development with Unity.

 

IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.


Edited by DareDeveloper, 24 March 2014 - 01:32 PM.

Given enough eyeballs, all mysteries are shallow.

ProcGames.com


#4 Nathan2222_old   Members   -  Reputation: -400

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:38 PM

IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.

Would a pacman game be a good fit him?

UNREAL ENGINE 4:
Total LOC: ~3M Lines
Total Languages: ~32
smile.png
--
GREAT QUOTES:
I can do ALL things through Christ - Jesus Christ
--
Logic will get you from A-Z, imagination gets you everywhere - Albert Einstein
--
The problems of the world cannot be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. - John F. Kennedy


#5 welly_59   Members   -  Reputation: 230

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 02:15 PM

All very valid points and I'll take them on board.

I am writing through a couple of c# books to supplement my learning, and switch to a unity project once my brain is full for the day :)

I've never heard of or taken part in Google code jams, so that's a very good idea that I'll take on board and research

Thanks

I guess I would not try to get a better understanding of a language (build a routine using it) by developing a game.
I'd probably go for solving Google Code Jam problems ... or similar coding challenges with C# and then return to learning game development with Unity.
 
IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.



#6 Durakken   Members   -  Reputation: 535

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 02:21 PM

It depends on what you're doing...

 

If you want to be a better designer, take that pong game and try to make it unique and still be good...

If you want to be a better programmer, try doing it or something similar without any tutorial...

 

If you've done either of those, then do I guess Pacman... then do the above with Pacman...

Or ignore all that, write down what you want to do in your own game, find a simple variation of those mechanics. Learn from the tutorial, then implement into your game... and just continue finding what you want to do, learning it, and implementing it.



#7 georger.araujo   Members   -  Reputation: 824

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 02:27 PM

ive been learning c# and monogame for a while now but have recently(yesterdat) moved to unity. Ive created a simple pong game, using some simple ai for the computer player, implemented a scoreboard and created a simple menu.

 

what next from here? would you say i should carry on with this game for a bit ie add sound effects, options(ai difficulty) etc or move onto something else?

 

my c# knowledge is pretty limited right now, but not as limited as my knowledge of unity!

 

Language proficiency aside, you could try to make Breakout next.

 

You should move on when you feel confident you've mastered the challenges involved in making the game, e.g. AI, math, graphics, animation, input, state management, and so on. You'll need those skills, and more, on your next, more complex game.



#8 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4692

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 03:26 PM

Please see my signature for ideas.


Beginner in Game Development? Read here.
 
Super Mario Bros clone tutorial written in XNA 4.0 [MonoGame, ANX, and MonoXNA] by Scott Haley
 
If you have found any of the posts helpful, please show your appreciation by clicking the up arrow on those posts Posted Image
 
Spoiler

#9 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2061

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:47 PM

I guess I would not try to get a better understanding of a language (build a routine using it) by developing a game.

I'd probably go for solving Google Code Jam problems ... or similar coding challenges with C# and then return to learning game development with Unity.

 

IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.

This is fairly wrong. If he wants to develop games, he should be working on his game development skills. Unless he's making large, 3D games, he won't need Algorithms (unless you count things like Sweep and Prune, but at the same time, those won't be needed unless you have a very complex 2D game). Data Structures are an integral part of C#, and I'd be surprised if he couldn't work his way around Arrays, Queues, and Stacks.

 

What he needs to do is make games. That's how you get better, it's a proven technique.

 

To the Original Poster: I made Breakout after Pong, for me it was a natural transition. Maybe you can try that too?


I'm a game programmer and computer science ninja ph34r.png!

Here's my 2D RPG-Ish Platformer Programmed in Python + Pygame, with a Custom Level Editor and Rendering System!

 

Here's my Custom IDE / Debugger Programmed in Pure Python and Designed from the Ground Up for Programming Education!

Want to ask about Python, Flask, wxPython, Pygame, C++, HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, C++, Vimscript, SFML 1.6 / 2.0, or anything else? Recruiting for a game development team and need a passionate programmer? Just want to talk about programming? Email me here:

hobohm.business@gmail.com

or Personal-Message me on here smile.png!


#10 BHXSpecter   Members   -  Reputation: 1673

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 24 March 2014 - 09:42 PM

This article is probably one in the list of most linked articles: 

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976

 

Has this nice list of games to make:

 

 

  • Pong = Simple: input, physics, collision detection, sound; scoring
  • Worm = Placement of random powerups, handling of screen boundaries, worm data structure
  • Breakout = Lessons of pong, powerups, maps (brick arrangements)
  • Missile Command = targeting; simple enemy ai, movement, and sound
  • Space Invaders = simple movement for player and enemy, very similar to breakout with the exception that the enemy constantly moves downward, simple sound
  • Asteroids = asteroids (enemies) and player can move in all directions, asteroids appear and move randomly, simple sound
  • Tetris = block design, clearing the lines, scoring, simple animation
  • Pac Man = simple animation, input, collision detection, maps (level design), ai
  • Ikari Warriors = top down view, enemy ai, powerups, scoring, collision detection, maps (level design), input, sound, boss ai
  • Super Mario Bros = lessons of Ikari Warriors (except with side-view instead of top-down view), acceleration, jumping, platforms

"Through vengence I was born.Through war I was trained.Through love I was found. Through death I was released. Through release I was given a purpose."


#11 welly_59   Members   -  Reputation: 230

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 25 March 2014 - 04:20 AM

Thanks everyone! I'm going to spend a bit more time with pong - difficulty levels, sound etc then will move onto breakout.

Im not ever going to be a pro at this but it is a hobby I enjoy . If I can spend some time doing it and have fun that is enough for me.

#12 welly_59   Members   -  Reputation: 230

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 25 March 2014 - 04:26 AM

In reply to the poster who said do it without tutorials that's what I do already. I will spend some time looking at guides but just to look for any concepts I did not think of or did not know. Then I will move onto making the game without any external guidance as soon as I think I have the basic idea of it.

For example I looked at a guide on using the unity GUI method as its not somtheing I've ever used before. As soon as I knew how to write the GUI I knew that I could then use my existing knowledge to make the scoreboard.

A lot of things in unity are not intuitive to someone who hasn't used it before. Attaching scripts to a gameobject so I can display the scoreboard being one of them. But now I know how to do it its something I can use again in any other project I start




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS