Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Learning Unity


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
16 replies to this topic

#1 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 119

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 04:39 AM

Hi there,

 

I come from a design background and I am keen on developing games for iOS. I get the impression that unity is a good tool for this. 

 

So now I would like to learn some programming in (or is it considered with?) Unity. Could some one experienced please recommend me a place to start ? (payed or free resource)

 

Thanks,



Sponsor:

#2 ProtectedMode   Members   -  Reputation: 1214

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 04:46 AM

Unity usually requires scripting. There is however a pretty commonly used extension called Playmaker that allowes for visual "programming". There are a lot of different text and video tutorials out there. Which kind or series you like depends on you. I recommend you search some basic tutorials on youtube and/or find a written tutorial that looks interesting and helpful. It depends on the person a lot...



#3 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 119

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 05:01 AM

What exactly does "scripting" mean in this context? 

 

I read that I must learn a programming language like C++ or C#, how does the language connect to the program Unity ? 

 

Sorry I am complete novice..



#4 ProtectedMode   Members   -  Reputation: 1214

Like
3Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 05:40 AM


Sorry I am complete novice..

That's not a problem. smile.png

 

The main languages used inside Unity are Javascript and C#. You can do exactly the same things in JS as in C#. C# is aside from Unity aimed for software applications while JS is mainly aimed for the browser. If you want to program for mobile you may want to choose for JS.

 


What exactly does "scripting" mean in this context?

Scripting is writing code that will be interpreted. In this case you write C#/JS code for Unity to define the bahaviour of objects. You will need to be able to program using one of these languages if you choose Unity. I think a basic understanding about programming is enough to start playing with Unity, so you don't need to be very good with Unity.

 

If you are sure you don't want to program you can also choose something like GameMaker.



#5 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 119

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 05:55 AM

Thanks.

 

I have a few game related ideas I'm pursuing atm. Still at conceptual level for all of them though.

 

So what would be the complexity of programming a game like "Threes" and "868-Hack" If you//anyone played these and can estimate ?

 

Edit: Also back to OP, Can you recommend A good tutorial starting point? I'm on a Mac so I can't use Visual Studio tuts.


Edited by tmer1, 03 April 2014 - 06:20 AM.


#6 moneal2001   Members   -  Reputation: 607

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 12:49 PM

Thanks.

 

I have a few game related ideas I'm pursuing atm. Still at conceptual level for all of them though.

 

So what would be the complexity of programming a game like "Threes" and "868-Hack" If you//anyone played these and can estimate ?

 

Edit: Also back to OP, Can you recommend A good tutorial starting point? I'm on a Mac so I can't use Visual Studio tuts.

 

a good tutorial on the basics of unity especially the new 2d stuff is

 

as protectedmode mentioned you need to know some programming in either c# or unityscript(unity derivitive of javascript).  the tutorial i linked is done in c#.  I would suggest you try to learn the basics of c# programming, MS has tutorials on their site as does rbwhitaker(

 

protected mode also mentioned playmaker.  its a good extention of unity that allows you to script logic for objects visually without any/much programming.  It can be bought from the Unity asset store. I have used it myself a little.  I liked it, but I am more interested in coding for myself.  here is the playmaker homepage that has tutorials and a forum there so you can see what it is like: 



#7 NotYourAverageUser   Members   -  Reputation: 500

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:44 PM

A while back Game Institute was having a great deal on their full course enrollment. Something like $49.  I went for it.  They have a section on unity with about 20 videos.  I find them full of great information.  You may want to check it out.



#8 Godmil   Members   -  Reputation: 744

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 04:08 PM

My stock answer for unity tutorials is the Walker Brothers, I've still not found a more comprehensive and nicely bitesized tutorial set anywhere else.



#9 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 119

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 April 2014 - 11:34 PM

So to program a game with Unity I need to learn C# and then also Unity features ? is that correct?

 

Where can I find good C# tutorials ? 

 

I got Xamarin Studio for writing C# is this a good choice?


Edited by tmer1, 04 April 2014 - 12:58 AM.


#10 moneal2001   Members   -  Reputation: 607

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 04 April 2014 - 01:02 AM

So to program a game with Unity I need to learn C# and then also Unity features ? is that correct?

 

Where can I find good C# tutorials ? And what program do i need to apply C# on a Mac ?

 

I learned a lot of  c# from tutorials at rbwhitaker's site.  My link didnt show up when i put it in my last post for some reason.  So  ill try again http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com/c-sharp-tutorials  .  I don't have any experience with using a mac and Unity, but I know Unity comes with monodevelop and that can be used to write scripts in c# or unityscript.  Again you can also use visual scripting extentions like playmaker on the unity asset store to give objects logic without coding.


Edited by moneal2001, 04 April 2014 - 01:03 AM.


#11 nesseggman   Members   -  Reputation: 360

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 04 April 2014 - 01:20 AM

So to program a game with Unity I need to learn C# and then also Unity features ? is that correct?

 

Where can I find good C# tutorials ? And what program do i need to apply C# on a Mac ?

You can also use Java in Unity (doesn't have to be C#) I don't know a good resource, becuase I learned C++ first and then just picked up C# by using the documentation for it (since they're quite similar in context) and playing around with it and troubleshooting. Oh, I do love Microsoft's official tutorials (the ones with Bob Tabor).

 

Here, I went and looked it up:

 

http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/C-Sharp-Fundamentals-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners

 

I have no idea how good it is, but I used his tutorials to get into Windows Phone development and they were great. He's easy to listen to and usually explains things in enough detail to take in without having to repeat the video or anything.

 

Codecademy.com is a great for complete beginners to coding. Use the Java course if you're wanting to get into C# right away, but honestly I'd just stick to Java since you can use that in Unity instead of C#, and C# is Microsoft-focused and meant to be used on Windows. It's not really appropriate for programming an iOS game anyway. Someone correct me if I am mistaken on this, though, because I don't touch Apple products.

However, I would strongly suggest just learning programming (in general) and game design and programming in quite a bit of detail before moving onto Unity. Make at least one graphical game without an engine, just using gaming libraries or something, before using an engine. I can't stress this enough! In the forums for popular engines like Unity and GMS, there are so many questions asked that show that people have no idea what the engine is even there for and how games work in general. So we pretty much have to explain a LOT more to them than really needed, and we're explaining concepts outside the scope of the engine. Which is fine, the forums are there for community help, but they will encounter more and more problems in the future until they understand these kinds of concepts. Things like object-oriented programming, game loops and updates, etc.

Plus, if you're wanting to develop for a platform like iOS, you need to learn how iOS programming works. Each platform has its own structure that you'll need to understand that is different than programming for your home computer (which is probably what you'll be learning with at first!)

Using a game engine like Unity is a lot like using professional music composition/notation software. You can learn how to use the software all you want, but if you don't know how to compose music, you won't get much out of it. Even if you learn how to notate music (which is kinda like simply learning basics of a programming language), actually making a musical composition will be difficult. You have to understand music theory and actual composition before you can use the software to help you actually compose a piece.

 

And depending on the type of game you want to make, you may consider other engines. Many engines are good for iOS games (as it's a very popular platform). Unity is great for physics-based action-focused games, and especially 3D games (though it now has 2D game structure built-in, too!). But other engines may be better for other things. I feel like turn-based/menu-based games or games that require no physics like SHMUPS are more easily constructed developed in something like GameMaker Studio (though it costs money, compared to Unity, which is free, and overall more fleshed-out), though GMS has a lot of other downsides. Of course, it's not impossible to make whatever you want in Unity, but it's not always the best engine for every project. Once you learn about coding and game programming, learn about many engines that are compatible with iOS and see which work best for whatever project you want to take on. Once you understand the basics, you'll be able to make a more educated decision on what engine you want to use. You may even decide you don't want to use an engine at all and can just use the toolkits provided by Apple to make your game in a more "from-scratch" format :)



#12 moneal2001   Members   -  Reputation: 607

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 04 April 2014 - 01:48 AM


Codecademy.com is a great for complete beginners to coding. Use the Java course if you're wanting to get into C# right away, but honestly I'd just stick to Java since you can use that in Unity instead of C#, and C# is Microsoft-focused and meant to be used on Windows. It's not really appropriate for programming an iOS game anyway. Someone correct me if I am mistaken on this, though, because I don't touch Apple products.

 

unity doesn't use java, but unityscript a derivitve of javascript.  c# is mainly used for windows apps, but does have uses outside windows through both unity and monogame.  both use c# and allow for development on ios, android, and even consoles.



#13 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 119

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 04 April 2014 - 02:39 AM

Thanks for replies.

 

I want to use C# and Unity because then I can export to Android and iOS simultaneously. 

 

The kind of games I plan on making first is a simple score based game like (Threes Or Drop7) or perhaps a more elaborate version of (868-Hack).

 

 

Im a bit confused though,

 

 

 

Use the Java course if you're wanting to get into C# right away, but honestly I'd just stick to Java since you can use that in Unity instead of C#,

 

Java is used inside C# ?

 



#14 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6111

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 04 April 2014 - 07:31 AM

 

Im a bit confused though,

 

 

 

Use the Java course if you're wanting to get into C# right away, but honestly I'd just stick to Java since you can use that in Unity instead of C#,

 

Java is used inside C# ?

 

Just ignore that one, he is obviously confused aswell.

 

To clarify:

 

Unity supports 3 languages,

C#

Boo - a .Net language related to python

UnityScript - a Unity specific derivate of JScript.Net (Which in turn is Microsofts .Net adaptation of JavaScript).

 

Java on the other hand is a completely different language which is quite similar to C# (But not supported  by Unity3D)

The name confusion is most likely the result of marketing drones at Sun(The company that created Java) and marketing drones at Netscape(The company that created JavaScript) eating/smoking/injecting illegal substances.


Edited by SimonForsman, 04 April 2014 - 07:32 AM.

I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#15 nesseggman   Members   -  Reputation: 360

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 06 April 2014 - 09:49 PM

OK, sorry, this whole time I thought Unity used JavaScript (which I guess it does in the form of UnityScript, but I thought it was just regular ol JS)... I'm even using Unity right now and can see in my head options for JavaScript, but I guess I was wrong (I do it all in C#).

 

And when editing some stuff out of my post, I accidentally removed a critical part -- Codecademy doesn't have C#, but you can learn Java there, which has a similar syntax to C# (moreso than Python and stuff) which will make getting into C# easier. That's what I meant by that.



#16 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21327

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 07 April 2014 - 03:30 AM


The kind of games I plan on making first is a simple score based game like (Threes Or Drop7) or perhaps a more elaborate version of (868-Hack).

As a designer Unity does open up a lot of possibilities, but you will still need assets and script to manage it.  Since they are 2D you might be able to draw the boxes you want, and write script for the animations, and maybe use some particle systems for effects. That still leaves you with audio.

 
You won't be making any of those games just by experimentation. They are complex enough that you need to figure out the game play details in depth. 
 
 
Once you have the carefully-completed design, the script for Threes or Drop7 is simple enough you might be able handle it with determination. The resulting scripts probably won't be pretty and optimal, but it only needs to be functional. The 868-Hack game looks a bit more complex so you would probably want to be more comfortable as a programmer before getting that far.
 
Any of Unity's three languages (C#, UnityScript, and Boo) will work. Just pick the one you are most comfortable with and go from there.

Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#17 Saint Retro   Members   -  Reputation: 262

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:57 AM

I would like to put forward the following free pdf as a good resource for learning C#

 






Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS