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Fez like 3D engine.


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#1 Bigfatmeany   Members   -  Reputation: 137

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 10:12 PM

I was playing minecraft with a friend earlier because I was bored and wanted a break from the programming I was doing. she was complaining about lag, and proposed the question "Why does minecraft lag on my computer". Well, shes pretty tech savey, so I gave my explanation (which I'm not going to state as to avoid de-railing the thread) and then I thought about FEZ. It was stated in "Indie Game: The Movie" (Im not sure of the company who created it or I would post it here) that the graphics in FEZ were created by taking 6 images from photoshop, putting them into a 32x32 square on a tile sheet, then wraping them around to make them form a block. 

 

Phil Fish, the creator of FEZ, made it sound simple, but it doesn't seem that simple to me. While Phil used Microsofts XDA, Mojang seems to have managed to do the same thing with java(I believe, the language could have changed, as I stopped keeping up to date with minecraft long ago).

 

I have theorized many ways to do this, but im unsure how to go about executing a test. I have never worked in a 3D enviroment before. I have never wanted to venture out of my 2D wonderland that im in.

 

So the quest is;

Where does one start with a SIMPLE <- it's obviously not simple, but I mean in comparisons to others, 3D engine.,

Or must something like DirectX be used to do this.

Im using the word engine, because It is what I believe an engine to be, there could be a better word for this.

 

 

My generally accepted (by myself I mean, i've never had anyone else to discuss this with) theory is to take an index of arrays, create an array for each side of the cube, and work that with an index of arrays grabbing textures, then rendering the full block to the screen. 

 

The language im using is C++.



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#2 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8001

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 11:00 PM

They are most likely are just using cubes, nothing fancy, which every 3d engine will handle.

 

A 3d engine will never be simple, it is a complex piece of software, but an engine could be more accessible. But to just render a simple cube (first steps into 3d rendering), I would recomment to start with some simple OpenGL or DirectX (these are the two major 3d rendering APIs to utliize the videocard rendering power) demos/turorials.

 

Here is a good, simple, OpenGL based, C++ based start: Nehe Legacy Tutorials

 

Yes, that are legacy tutorials (because there are newer versions of opengl available), but it is still a good learning source to get in first contact with 3d rendering. Once you have learned enough, you can switch to a newer API.



#3 Endurion   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3687

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 11:23 PM

I've written a little game similar to FEZ (http://www.georg-rottensteiner.de/en/games.html#babel).

 

It's just simple textured cubes (FEZ does have smaller cubes for details though).


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#4 Saint Retro   Members   -  Reputation: 262

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 02:29 AM

I've written a little game similar to FEZ (http://www.georg-rottensteiner.de/en/games.html#babel).

 

It's just simple textured cubes (FEZ does have smaller cubes for details though).

 

It looks great, I shall have a go when I get home from work.



#5 Bigfatmeany   Members   -  Reputation: 137

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 08:22 PM

They are most likely are just using cubes, nothing fancy, which every 3d engine will handle.

 

A 3d engine will never be simple, it is a complex piece of software, but an engine could be more accessible. But to just render a simple cube (first steps into 3d rendering), I would recomment to start with some simple OpenGL or DirectX (these are the two major 3d rendering APIs to utliize the videocard rendering power) demos/turorials.

 

Here is a good, simple, OpenGL based, C++ based start: Nehe Legacy Tutorials

 

Yes, that are legacy tutorials (because there are newer versions of opengl available), but it is still a good learning source to get in first contact with 3d rendering. Once you have learned enough, you can switch to a newer API.

ah, Ok, I understand more now knowing that it's nothing super fancy, just something basic. Thank you for your help.

 

On the other hand

 

Im going to start with OpenGL because I know SDL very well, so I've been told OpenGL is a good direction to head in.

but what does DirectX offer over OpenGL?



#6 Truerror   Members   -  Reputation: 469

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 09:47 PM

Most developers choose between DirectX/OpenGL based on the platform they're targeting. For example, if you're targeting Android/iOS, you have no choice but to use OpenGL. Likewise, you can only develop with DirectX for Windows Phone or Windows Store. If you're just targeting Windows desktop though, you can use whichever.

 

Of course. some might argue that DirectX has better developer toolchain, or that OpenGL is more ubiquitous, or that one has feature X that the other doesn't support (or support is poor), or just plain fanboyism. But ultimately, it's the end goal that decides everything.

 

Like the posters above me, I'd suggest using an established game engine. These engines (most of them anyway) provides an abstraction over the APIs, so the developer won't need to worry about what underlying API it's using.






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