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Making a Game: Which Card to Use?


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#1 Jason_Brandy   Members   -  Reputation: 104

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 06:37 PM

Hello Everyone.

 

I have settled on a game make and with that, also decided to upgrade my 2GB SC 660ti.  
I'm caught between an EVGA 780ti ACX Classified/Kingpin and the EVGA Titan Black SC (Signature).

Now, I know the Titan offers higher performance on FP64 situations, but when exactly will that be used (if at all)?
Mainly will UE4, 3ds Max, etc. use FP64 computing in any way?
As a game developer, will the Titan benefit me in any way over the 780ti?

So which card do you guys think would be the best to choose and why?

Fell free to ask for any additional information.

Thanks in Advance.

- Jason Brandy
 



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#2 minibutmany   Members   -  Reputation: 1485

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 07:19 PM

 Are you noticing any lack of performance in the programs that you mentioned? It may be hard to justify all the extra cash for the titan...

For this kind of thing, you may be better looking into a workstation card like a quadro, rather than a gtx card which is geared towards gaming.


Stay gold, Pony Boy.

#3 kauna   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2166

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 09:43 PM

Typically you won't need FP64, so it may not be so important point. I wouldn't either put any extra bucks to get those workstation graphics cards, probably you won't be able to use them any better than a typical high end GPU. 780 Sounds pretty good. 

 

Cheers!



#4 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2973

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 09:52 PM

Hi,

 

If you are a beginner or intermediate game developer, then I feel that the least expensive one would be very adequate.  In my opinion, game development doesn't start demanding highest performance until the developer reaches higher skill and development needs. I personally have two lower performing PCs which combined are still cheaper than 1 top performing one.  While one PC is crunching a task, I work with the other one. If you can save enough money with the lower priced one, you might want to consider taking the savings toward getting a cheap laptop PC for doing coding while your high performance one is crunching numbers.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#5 SeanMiddleditch   Members   -  Reputation: 4029

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 01:43 AM

I'm going to second 3Ddreamer. It is going to be some time before you're doing much to stress out a mediocre card. Even when you do stress it, it'll mostly be because you're doing something bad in your code (or your art assets), not because the card isn't up to par. You can do plenty of indie game development just fine on an Intel integrated GPU.

There's even an argument to be made that you should use the lowest-end card you expect your game to run on it (I don't necessarily agree with said argument, but it's still there).

#6 mhagain   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7462

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 03:17 AM

There's even an argument to be made that you should use the lowest-end card you expect your game to run on it (I don't necessarily agree with said argument, but it's still there).

 

You should at least test on it.

 

If you're developing an OpenGL program you should at a minimum also be prepared to test on AMD and possibly even Intel.  Unfortunately the state of OpenGL drivers means that developing on NVIDIA means that you run a very high risk of introducing code that will only work on NVIDIA - whether that's down to NVIDIA's extra permissiveness, or driver bugs in the other two.


It appears that the gentleman thought C++ was extremely difficult and he was overjoyed that the machine was absorbing it; he understood that good C++ is difficult but the best C++ is well-nigh unintelligible.


#7 Jason_Brandy   Members   -  Reputation: 104

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 04:45 AM

Hey guys thanks for the responses.

 

In a self-evaluation standpoint I'd say I'm a intermediate developer.

With that said, I never really thought the 780ti would be the better option.

 

I'm trying to figure out who would even go for a Titan Black then...

Even proffessional wise, I'm assuming most are using Quadros, or regular Titans (?).

 

As coding on a second computer, I usually do my code work on my 7 year old computer or I just use my main one.

 

To wrap this up I ended up picking up a 780ti and 290x, so I can see AMD and NVIDIA in action.

 

Thanks for the help guys!

-Jason






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