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What ever you do say away from vacuum cleaners and inside of your pc

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#1 ankhd   Members   -  Reputation: 1119

Posted 29 May 2014 - 10:04 PM

Damn it I lost 2 gig of ram today and 4 hours to find why my pc not beep on start up and why it never started.
 
there was so much dust in my Pc I had no choice no one around here sells compressed air in cans.
 
And my cpu fan was full and overheating.

Edited by Hodgman, 01 June 2014 - 01:39 AM.
removed mod humour :(


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#2 Washu   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 4561

Posted 29 May 2014 - 10:10 PM

So... you've just learned something that you probably should have realized many many long dogs ago.
 
Moving air over the nozzle of your vacuum generates a space pipe, creates a capacitance effect, and the end result is that when it's discharged you get a nice static meow.
 
All that being said, if you were still running on long dogs... time to get a new hard cat anyways. Apparently your vacuum thought so too.

Edited by Hodgman, 30 May 2014 - 09:19 PM.

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#3 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2056

Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:00 PM

vacuuming long dogs will cause problems.  PC will sometimes reboots and mud.  Lots of problems if you try to download clock.  I suggest that you avoid the beep.



#4 xbattlestation   Members   -  Reputation: 312

Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:15 PM

WTF?  Why would Washu edit that post to not make sense like that? 

 

Original post:

 

Damn it I lost 2 gig of ram today and 4 hours to find why my pc not beep on start up and why it never started.
 
there was so much dust in my Pc I had no choice no one around here sells compressed air in cans.
 
And my cpu fan was full and overheating.

 

 

 
Washu's edited post:
 
Damn it I lost 2 long dogs of ram today and 4 hard cats to find why my pc not beep on start up and why it never space piped.
 
there was so much long dog in my Pc I had no choice no one around here sells compressed air in cans.
 
And my hard cat was full and meowing.

 

 


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#5 fastcall22   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4039

Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:19 PM

WTF? Why would Washu edit that post to not make sense like that?


Because it makes perfect sense. "Long dog", "hard cat", and other phrases are inside jokes here at gamedev.
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#6 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8190

Posted 30 May 2014 - 02:23 AM

Ah, I was wondering if I was the only one finding the post incomprehensible while Washu appeared to find it perfectly normal and meaningful laugh.png

 

Anyway yeah don't literally vacuum the inside of your PC. You can vacuum the case fans from the outside if you want, to clean them every now and then, but vacuuming your motherboard is just.. wrong.


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#7 ankhd   Members   -  Reputation: 1119

Posted 30 May 2014 - 02:50 AM

so How did someone change my post Hackers I smell.



#8 Waterlimon   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2384

Posted 30 May 2014 - 04:47 AM

But consider the following - what if you were to attach one of those anti-static electricity wristbands onto the vacuum? 

 

How do you attach things to a vacuum anyways?


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#9 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9672

Posted 30 May 2014 - 05:32 AM

You can avoid all these problems if you convert to a fish tank PC.


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#10 Icebone1000   Members   -  Reputation: 986

Posted 30 May 2014 - 10:50 AM

I clean my notebook fans and keyboard with a vacuum cleaner, from outside only. If youre insistent it even remove the fan noises that come with time (and fur, lots of fur)


Edited by Icebone1000, 05 June 2014 - 01:38 PM.


#11 BaneTrapper   Members   -  Reputation: 1122

Posted 05 June 2014 - 12:42 PM

If you vacuum cleaner is weak, use a brush, use a soft hair one.

Antistatic%20Brush.jpg


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#12 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4533

Posted 05 June 2014 - 01:40 PM

Huh, dude, seriously?

 

I'm vacuuming my motherboard, the cpu, and the graphics card every two months, and once every year in spring, I take the compressor out in the garden and blow everything proper with 8 atmospheres. Never had anything break.

 

Then again, people are telling me that you'll destroy DIMMs and other integrated circuits if you merely touch them with your bare hand, and you have to wear grounded wristbands and such (some fairy tale about static charges). Only special dance I've ever done is casually touching the PSU case with my elbow (not rarely accidentially rather than intentionally!), never had one component fail.



#13 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9672

Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:08 PM


Then again, people are telling me that you'll destroy DIMMs and other integrated circuits if you merely touch them with your bare hand, and you have to wear grounded wristbands and such (some fairy tale about static charges). Only special dance I've ever done is casually touching the PSU case with my elbow (not rarely accidentially rather than intentionally!), never had one component fail.

I've always wondered about this. I've spent half my life building and repairing computers, have never owned an anti-static wristband, and have never zapped any hardware...


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#14 LennyLen   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3446

Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:27 PM


Then again, people are telling me that you'll destroy DIMMs and other integrated circuits if you merely touch them with your bare hand

 

It isn't that you will destroy, but that you could destroy, electrostatic sensitive components.  Generally you don't build up enough static charge to do any damage, but it is a possibility, and it's always safer to take precautions.  I used to work at an electronics plant where we built very expensive switch mode power rectifiers for use in cell towers in remote locations and also for medical use.  Chance of failure had to be so low that you could be fired for not using anti-static equipment while working.

 

I was told by one of our electrical engineers once that ICs are less prone to damage once they're soldered into a board.  I don't know if that's true however.



#15 TheComet   Members   -  Reputation: 1389

Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:35 AM

As someone who works as an electronic engineer, and has electronic hardware production experience...

Generally you don't build up enough static charge to do any damage

This is far from the truth. Humans typically build up to 300V by just moving their hand through the air. Much more when standing up, walking, etc.

Pulling off a wool jumper can charge a human up to 30'000V.

 

Where I work, we used to not have any kind of ESD protection in production and had a component failure rate of around 2% for the sensitive components. When introducing grounded floors, ESD bags, wrist bands, and of course ESD mantles and ESD shoes, failure rates drastically sunk (by factors of over 1000).

 

Older ICs and generally all FETs are highly sensitive to ESD because of high impedance between pins. Exceeding 200V will usually destroy them.

 

Newer ICs all have protection diodes and current limiting resistors on every pad to withstand ESD:

 

gate-protection-diodes.png

This has become standard procedure, especially in the field of computer components. That is why samoth is able to vacuum his stuff without destroying anything.


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#16 Luckless   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1695

Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:39 PM

One of those things that you can get away with, but doesn't make it a good idea.

 

In most small cities or towns you can probably step off the sidewalk anywhere during the day and stroll to the other side without getting hit. However I'm still going to look both ways and make sure it is clear. (Especially on one way streets... People who only look in the direction the cars are suppose to be coming from have far more faith in humanity than I do.)

 

I have worked on lots of computers over the years, and have rarely used proper ESD protection. However I do precautions such as manually grounding out frequently, not wearing socks, not working in places I know are prone to charge build up, etc.

 

Personally I use a 'rocket blower' out of my photography kit. Little hand air pump. Not the greatest tool for blasting dust out, but as long as I stay on top of things it isn't bad.


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#17 Chris_F   Members   -  Reputation: 2000

Posted 06 June 2014 - 07:55 PM

Should have switched Mega Maid from suck to blow. I typically use an air compressor or even a leaf blower to clean computers out. Don't buy that canned crap. It's a waste of money and it is bad for the environment.



#18 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 17376

Posted 06 June 2014 - 08:09 PM

For compressed air, I bought a 6-pack from Amazon.com, and a single can lasts me through at least 3 PC cleans. At $28 (and free shipping) for 6 cans, that's ~$5 a can. Amazon tells me I bought the six-pack in January of 2012, and I clean out my PC about every two months and still have 2 1/2 cans.

 

This is my second six pack - the first six pack had a defective can sprayer that broke off - still a good deal.


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#19 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4533

Posted 20 June 2014 - 04:53 AM


Humans typically build up to 300V by just moving their hand through the air. [...] Pulling off a wool jumper can charge a human up to 30'000V.
Does the voltage even matter given that the electric charge is close to zero? Sure, waving your hands is comparable to raindrops in a thunderstorm moving, and we know what happens to things that are struk by lightning. But... that's like 20 or so orders of magnitude different in charge (and 5-6 orders in voltage).

 

300V is something that is easily lethal for a human, even more so 30.000V, given a big enough charge or power source that can sustain a current (like, a plug in the wall, a power line, or a thunderstorm). But otherwise, it's merely enough for a tickle. From experience, I can tell that I've never died from static discharge.

 

So my non-scientific guess would be that the charge you can reasonably have on your body by waving hands and such is only good to maintain a current a fraction a few femtoseconds (or something similarly small) under what's more or less a "short circuit" condition.



#20 the incredible smoker   Members   -  Reputation: 265

Posted 20 June 2014 - 08:23 AM

I Always vacuum clean my computers,

300 volt is a whole lot for moving tru air ( dint know that ).

I do Always touch the radiator first before handling components.

Also look to the weather if its static loaded ( like when its freezing ), in wet weather no problem.


Edited by the incredible smoker, 20 June 2014 - 08:24 AM.

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