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how much happenings and characters should be convincing in games?


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#1 moeen k   Members   -  Reputation: 516

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 10:55 AM

its a important question to me.

i think in many horror game we play them no to we want to be scared i think we play them because there are a lots of charades(if i used the right word) and complicated story but i think there is a problem.

 

but i think in many of these kind of game happenings and characters are not convincing.

 

for example we know resident evil series as best games but you think in re5 how a character like majini can be there? is that a zombie?

 

how a zombie can hang that axe? and game never says it can be a biochemical new creature or in fear1 paxton in one of chapter stand againts one of glasses that you can see him through it and it scares you so much but after a little thinking you say how is he there or why is he there and its more like a puzzle that you try to find the reason but you never find a reason.

 

or in cod: black ops mayson does many things but in his illusion he thinks that reznof makes them and you say is that possible?

 

and i think you can find a lot of these examples for yourself. there is a question. game designer just writes a basic story and those characters are there maybe concept artist drew it well and it makes game more attracting or every part a game happenings should have a story behind it and it have to convince a player.

 

maybe  it depends on players age but all of games i exampled are for higher level of age groups. thank you for helping



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#2 facehead1992   Members   -  Reputation: 491

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 01:06 PM

The significance of a realistic and consistent narrative is completely dependent on how much the game itself emphasizes its own story as a means of attracting/enticing the player. If I'm playing a tetris knock-off, you can guess that I'm likely not gonna care squat about whether any of the characters are behaving naturally. It'll just be awkward, and I'll deal with it because I'm more concerned about the blocks and THEIR movements.

The games you mentioned generally try to deliver a "valued" story experience (I say "valued" because the creators developed it with the viewpoint that some of the value you are purchasing when buying the product is a story, in addition to a gameplay experience). In something like those, I would say that it is critical, for the story to be successful, that the story be as coherent and consistent as possible. If you confuse or irritate the player while they are playing a game, then their immersion in the story breaks. The best games are able to maintain an ongoing immersive experience that makes people lose track of time (*cough cough* Skyrim *cough cough*).

That said, if you have a story that fails on occasion in this respect and jolts the player out of the experience so that they can ponder something strange such as you describe, it doesn't necessarily mean that it is a "bad" video game. After all, any of the other components of the game could help it be a positive experience for them: art, music, gameplay, level design, control interface, voice acting, or even just the general plot. Some hiccups every now and then in the story will detract, but not necessarily ruin, the story element of the game.

What WILL be a problem is if there are gaping holes in the story that make you wonder at the motivations of the characters or leave you completely confused as to what/how things are happening. It is here that you will confuse a player, leading to irritation at the story, and a soon-to-be dissatisfied player. To avoid this, make sure that, if you have a story in your game, the gameplay complements the story just as much as the story complements the gameplay. The player shouldn't be doing things that don't make sense within the context of the story. Likewise, the story shouldn't go along paths that don't make sense with what the gameplay entails.

 

After checking that the two are balanced, you will need to make sure that each individual segment of the game (with story-gameplay-pairs already balanced) are then balanced against each other so that successive tasks make sense in light of the previous tasks. It's necessary to line up the story this way so that the story proceeds in a fashion that follows an easy-to-follow narrative and it's necessary for the gameplay because the nature and difficulty of the tasks presented to the player need to align themselves with both the difficulty curve & the diversity of gameplay experiences the player expects (example: if you have several different activities in the game, don't make the first 3 tasks given to the player all be the same. You will need to showcase all the experiences in store for them so that they will wish to continue).


Edited by facehead1992, 05 June 2014 - 01:06 PM.


#3 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10159

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:29 PM

This is more a writing question than a game design question, so I'll move this there.

The answer to the question "how important is it that story be convincing" is, "it depends." Superhero and zombie games require a certain amount of suspension of disbelief; some games do not need to seem realistic at all, and other games benefit from a very realistic treatment. It depends on the genre and the audience.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#4 moeen k   Members   -  Reputation: 516

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:42 PM

facehead1992 your opinion was great. as i think now the matter is most part of the games now is action.

 

as you know even in action movies there is this problem. the story is just there to be a cause of acton to entertain people and there will be such little time to tell about character.

 

video games basically are not convincing. never in reall world a single person can kill big amount of people and most of the time game play is not there to be reall, is there just to be fun so ths rule will be for story too and its not justice to want story to be reall and convincing.

 

maybe in david cage games everything is in right place but there is not much gameplay but still there is good example for games with good story.

 

i think the last of us was a good example but as you said it was a great challange to have both gameplay and right story and maybe because of that neil druckman won all the narrative awards.

 

as i like to play games for story maybe i wanted to start design by story but now i find its the hard way. i think its better to work for a theme and make gameplay design and story and other elements for that theme.

thank you



#5 Shane C   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1283

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:42 PM

Horror is all about the fear of the unknown. It's a special case. In most games, you want to know stuff. In horror, some things you shouldn't know, to keep the fear alive.



#6 moeen k   Members   -  Reputation: 516

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:51 PM

Horror is all about the fear of the unknown.

 thats the exact answer.maybe thats because of in horror games we dont understand many parts






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