Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

From mobile to PC graphics


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
2 replies to this topic

#1 Shane C   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1283

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 05 June 2014 - 01:30 PM

I'm accustomed to designing for mobile hardware, where I just feel like expectations are lower than on PC.

 

However, I'm going to be using the Unreal 4 Engine for a PC game it looks like, so I might as well try to make it look good.

 

The problem is, like I said, I'm accustomed to designing for mobile. I will have more power available now. But I need to learn to utilize that extra power well - I mean, you can't just put 1 million polygons in a rock.

 

So besides my general "Got any advice?" question, I'll also ask a more specific question. It's almost a proven fact that models alone won't make a game graphical. You need lighting, etc. But my question is, not counting normal-mapping and completely forgetting about it for a second...

 

Would I be okay making human characters 20k polygons for a modern PC game, and focusing on lighting and stuff to make it graphical, or do I need something more robust like 40k per human character?

 

I'm aware the actual mesh and its quality matters as well...

 

Any advice is appreciated.


Edited by Shane C, 05 June 2014 - 03:03 PM.


Sponsor:

#2 SapphireG   Members   -  Reputation: 125

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 05 June 2014 - 03:02 PM

I'd say you're pretty decent in the 20k polygon mark, but I guess it also depends on how many of them you want to render simultaneously. Afaik, and just for a reference, Hitman Absolution's main character (2012) and Tomb Raider's Lara (2013) are in the 20k-35k range.



#3 Rld_   Members   -  Reputation: 1520

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:36 AM

While I agree with SapphireG's answer, I would like to add that "it depends" as well and applying some logical thinking can take you a long way. It's nice to have a reference of what your maximum aim should be before you make the actual model (especially for complex models), aiming for the max isn't always the answer.

 

Simple examples: You can model a plane with 2k vertices, but 4 would very likely suffice. You can add 5 lights to your scene, but perhaps you can make it work with 2. Etc. :)

 

especially when it comes to models, adding more vertices at some point will simply not matter that much anymore. So also keep it reasonable for what you want to achieve. Every calculation you can do less, you can use for something else, or ensure a certain framerate.






Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS